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Published 5 years ago by Chubros with 15 Comments
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Conversation 11 comments by 7 users
  • dakpan (edited 5 years ago)
    +10

    city officials fought to keep graphic video of the killing under wraps.

    What would be ligitimate reasons to keep this kind of video footage away from the public?

    • Inconceivable
      +7

      I'll play devil's advocate for a second here. Most of the public don't have the training that the police have and we're also stepping into a video with no context or prior knowledge of what's going on. The best legitimate reason I can think of is to keep people from making uninformed judgements of the police based on the video.

      But I'm not defending what they did.

      • finkployd
        +7

        I would agree with this, but I've noticed they have none of the same issues releasing a video if they feel it exonerates them. The same caveats technically apply, but they only bring them up if it is in their best interest to do so.

        • Inconceivable
          +4

          You're right, and I think this is one reason why people have a problem with the police. We need accountability all the time, not just when it's convenient for them.

      • Mtat
        +3

        Given that in US cameras are allowed into the courtrooms and have newsmedia print headshots and detailed information about police arrests before the trials, this is a very weird argument.

      • BlankWindow (edited 5 years ago)
        +3

        There are fewer mistakes made by concealed carry users because they wait until their life is in danger. You see these fatalities by the hands of police officers because they usually fire when they think their life may be in danger soon. Most Officers have never been in a possible fatal situation and knowing how someone is going to act in one is absolutely impossible to say. Perhaps Infantry have better chances with so much of their lives dedicated to training, but police officers simply don't have that day in and day out training style. It would also be silly to try and implement one. I know all types of homicide have been on the decline for many years even if our new media outlets and coverage may (want to) make it look otherwise.

        • nachobusiness
          +1

          So your saying we can't train cops to deal with potentially deadly situations? So what happens when the act incorrectly in these situations, nothing!?

          • BlankWindow
            +1

            I clearly stated, "Most officers have never been in a possible fatal situation and knowing how someone is going to act in one is absolutely impossible to say. Perhaps Infantry have better chances with so much of their lives dedicated to training, but police officers simply don't have the day in and day out training style." I will expound on this idea to hopefully make it a little more clear for you.

            A person who has a specific job to deal with potentially deadly situations spends far more time training for it than an officer would ever have any need for. So much so that the training far exceeds any actual time spent in the field acting on what they practice every single day. An officer is unlikely to see many, if any, of these incidents. Making the need for excessive training a thing of specialized police units. Even someone who does receive considerable amounts of training can completely crack under what is going on. I've watched it happen.

            It is an unfortunate thing to witness someone being gunned down for either the right or wrong reason. I find it hard to believe anyone clicked play on that video not expecting exactly what they got. May I suggest not watching them if it upsets you.

            As for your question? I am not a judge. I am not a jury. If I think you are attempting to take my life, I very well may be your executioner. Anyone would choose a judge and jury over what is perceived as certain death.

            That is a fact of life.

      • dakpan
        +3

        That's very true. It happens very often that people judge prematurely upon seeing an image or video and then uphold unsuported/malinformed opinions because they neglected to put it into context or ask questions. But context can be provided in the video, so you could only miss it by actively avoiding it.

      • shiranaihito (edited 5 years ago)
        +1

        to keep people from making uninformed judgements of the police based on the video

        You've got it backwards. The video helps people make informed judgements of the police. That's bad for the police, because obviously they don't want their true nature revealed. The police aren't there to protect us. They exist to protect them from us.

        The police are the ruling classes enforcers. As a job perk, they get to loot innocent people: http://www.washingtonpost.com/sf/investigative/2014/09/06/stop-and-seize/

        They also get power over us little worker ants, they get to ruin lives on a whim, they get to shoot people's dogs and barge into their houses with assault rifles pointed at terrified, dazed & confused little peons who were sleeping before the attack.

        That shit is delightful for a psychopath.. and that's why a lot of cops are psychopaths. Probably most of them.

    • shiranaihito
      +1

      It's blindingly obvious they hid the video exactly because they didn't want the public to see it, because it would undermine the "Protect & Serve" -bullshit the public is fed.

      There is no "legitimate" reason.

  • [Deleted Profile] (edited 5 years ago)

    [This comment was removed]

  • Bamischijf
    +3

    I feel that they shouldn't even have drawn their guns to begin with. They escalated the situation by pulling their guns when it wasn't even necessary in the first place.

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