LOUNGE all new asksnapzu ideasforsnapzu newtribes interesting pics videos funny technology science technews gaming health history worldnews business web research entertainment food living internet socialmedia mobile space sports photography nature animals movies culture travel television finance music celebrities gadgets environment usa crime politics law money justice psychology security cars wtf art google books lifetips bigbrother women apple kids recipes whoa military privacy education facebook medicine computing wildlife design war drugs middleeast diet toplists economy fail violence humor africa microsoft parenting dogs canada neuroscience architecture religion advertising infographics sex journalism disaster software aviation relationships energy booze life japan ukraine newmovies nsa cannabis name Name of the tribe humanrights nasa cute weather gifs discoveries cops futurism football earth dataviz pets guns entrepreneurship fitness android extremeweather fashion insects india northamerica
+89
Save

What's one useful skill that can be learned in an hour or less?

3 years ago by canuck with 85 comments

Join the Discussion

  • Auto Tier
  • All
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
Post Comment
Conversation 13 comments by 6 users
  • VoyagerXyX
    +17

    Basic HTML Here

    • sea
      +15

      I got up one morning and thought, I'm gonna learn HTML. Took me 30 mins, promptly forgot about it the next day

      • VoyagerXyX
        +3

        That's the thing :P If you don't use it you forget it. The other side of that though is if you go back to it it's like riding a bike. You only really need to learn once. After that it's all recollection.

        • voicesinmyhead
          +6

          It's not so much forgetting it entirely, it's more forgetting all of the obscure elements. I've been a hobbyist developer for almost 20 years, and I'm still looking up the syntax for certain HTML elements on most projects.

          • VoyagerXyX
            +2

            I do it often as well, that's why I was sure to put "basics" in the suggestion haha. It's kind of like Othello. Their old boxes used to say "a minute to learn, a lifetime to master"

    • pseudopsynic
      +3

      codecademy is the best. I wish their CSS course went a little more in depth, but it's still great for getting a basic foundation.

      • VoyagerXyX
        +2

        I absolutely agree, but there are a ton of other great services out there that take it way further than Codecademy for the intermediate stuff.

        • pseudopsynic
          +3

          Exactly. It's almost hard to choose which service to use.

        • Naver36
          +1

          Could you recommend some of these other great services?

          • VoyagerXyX
            +3

            THIS is an excellent article. I can't vouch for all of these services but the MIT courseware is fantastic. This should keep you busy for a while. Try them all! Start a discussion some day about your favorites! :)

    • Wenjarich
      +2

      So you have successfully managed to to both cause me spend an entire day glued to that site learning python and as a result having picked up a new hobbie. I'm not sure whether to thank you or curse you for adding to the list of things to try squeeze into my already limited time. Haha oh well....ok so back to functions. ..

      • VoyagerXyX
        +2

        If you had to pick one, I'd prefer thanked. I'd rather not be cursed for the rest of my life! ^_^ Glad I could be of help! Keep coding!

        • Wenjarich
          +2

          Haha, I was having great fun. I kept telling myself, "I'll just do one more lesson." Next thing I knew, it was 12 in the evening sheesh :P only frustration is that they obviously require a you to use exactly the same variable names as they give you for checking your answer. This resulted in one or two occasions where the reason I was getting told me answer wasn't write was because I used a capital letter where they asked me for a lower case letter or something like that. But I understand it makes their marking process easier so its not an issue.

  • Newthora
    +27

    You can follow a recipe to cook dinner, and that can improve you cooking skill.

    • spammusbi
      +9

      Agreed. Cooking can save you tons of money, plus it's always fun to cook new things!

    • sea
      +5

      You also get dinner.

    • PMMeLadyNudes
      +5

      How many times do I need to cook something really basic like oatmeal until I can grind enough cooking skill to make a crown roast?

      • GeniusIComeAnon
        +5

        About 10 million times since oatmeal becomes worth less experience as you level up.

    • nestamon
      +2

      Especially fresh pasta. If people knew how easy and cheap it is to make, the average waistline would go up a lot.

      • Teska
        +1

        I LOVE fresh pasta. But with two little kids (who not only want to "help" but also want the twirly pasta) it can be difficult to do at the best of times. But it's so yummy!

    • spammusbi
      +2

      Sorry, shameful promotion....but I started /t/asianfood.

      If you really want to try new recipes check us out.

    • cunt
      +1

      This is a top answer, once you can cook you can get the girls. Just started a small home baking company and its a lot of fun

  • nicoscope (edited 3 years ago)
    +26

    CPR.

    Saving lives could be considered useful.

    • wolfeater
      +3

      Nah, I don't see how that could be practical at all.

    • Polygon
      +3

      Agreed, very useful. Saving lives is always a pretty good thing to do, in my opinion.

    • moottranslation
      +1

      Fun story, I went tubing with a group of friends recently, and we rescued a guy who was drowning (from being so drunk and falling off his tube). Three of us had medical training, and none of us were ridiculously turnt, so he was lucky that we were the next group after his.

  • ndhamecom
    +12

    Meditation. Clearing the mind to allow for objective reflection.

    • NerfYoda
      +5

      How'd you get meditation down in an hour? I've been trying for years and still feel like I don't have it right.

      • ekyris
        +4

        While most meditation requires years and years of practice to master, keep in mind there's not like a single way you have to meditate. If it calms you down, helps you clear your mind of worry and anxiety, I'd say you're doing it right! And if it doesn't, maybe try looking at some online resources to see recommended techniques and the like...

      • frostysauce
        +3

        I feel meditation is one of those things you're never supposed to get right.

    • Bazill
      +3

      Meditation only requires practice in the sense that you must clear your mind. While you meditate there are always going to be stimulus trying to combat one another for your attention but you have to take another deep breath and clear your mind once again. It's so very easy to learn meditation, but so very difficult to master it.

    • HeyYourself
      +2

      I dont think you learn it in one hour though. You gotta take the ride, practice every day, and only after that you "learned it".

  • trails
    +10

    Pivot tables. I have changed lives in less than sixty minutes when introducing basic Excel users to them.

  • Ryvaeus
    +10

    Learning how to swap out parts in your computer (desktop or laptop), which will eventually lead to building your own PC and save you money on incremental upgrades instead of replacing entire machines. If you've ever played with LEGO, doing this is kind of similar, only a bit more expensive (just a bit, goddamn those LEGO prices).

    • HgFin
      +3

      I found a great video on building a gaming PC a while ago, very useful for learning where the parts go and how to install them.

      • Ryvaeus
        +2

        LinusTechTips is a great channel. Linus is funny, friendly, and approachable enough to be a pretty effective teacher regarding all things tech. I also highly recommend his companion channel, Techquickie. His video, "What is a Core i3, Core i5, or Core i7 as Fast As Possible," is something I still refer friends/family to to this day.

        • HgFin
          +2

          Yeah I agree. I've been checking out his channel recently because soon I will be building my own gaming PC, something I've been wanting to do for a while now. He is an extremely friendly and funny guy, and makes everything easy and understandable.

          • Ryvaeus
            +1

            Best of luck to you with your upcoming rig! Don't be afraid to ask for help if you're ever unsure about any aspect of your build. /t/buildapc exists!

  • bryan
    +7

    The thing is... most seriously useful skills will take more than an hour to learn. A useful skill to learn is patience; know that things can take very long times to come to fruition, and learn to be okay with that. It's something I have a hard time doing, and it's definitely an important skill

    • wolfeater
      +3

      Agreed. An hour might get you started on a skill with a low barrier of entry, but there's nothing you can really fully "learn" in an hour that has wide practical applications.

      It is all about putting the work in.

  • NerfYoda
    +7

    Changing the oil in your car. Car maintenance is easier than it looks, and I feel like a wizard after I fix something.

  • FunkyCatJr
    +7

    Learn the basics of how to sharpen knives, scissors, and other cutting tools.

    • newuser
      +2

      Rub hard, rub fast, rub in one direction - and position, position, position!

      • nestamon
        +5

        So guys who masturbate already have like a cross-skill opportunity here?

  • LimitedMind
    +4

    Crocheting.... And you can make yourself a nifty afghan or hat

    • Sonderling
      +4

      Do you have any tips/resources you could share? I've been trying to take up crocheting but it feels like no matter how much I practice I haven't gotten any better. I very much want to learn, though.

      • Teakay
        +6

        My advice is basically to examine every explanation of the process you can find. Read written descriptions, look at diagrams, watch videos, etc. Eventually one of them will make all the pieces you've been collecting fall into place. Crocheting really isn't hard at all, and even if you don't do it quite right it will often still look good as long as you have the basic idea. Getting that basic idea is the hardest part, though. It isn't hard, but it looks hard until you understand what crocheting actually is.

        Once you have the basic idea down, just crochet and crochet and crochet until you feel like you can attempt harder stuff. At the beginning I wouldn't even worry about patterns, you can just make simple stuff up as you go.

        I say all of this because it took me ages to learn. I first tried learning with a book my grandma got me when I was seven. It made absolutely no sense to me and I couldn't do anything except make a chain, so I gave up. A few years later I tried again and still couldn't do it. Repeat once or twice more. Finally last winter I decided I was finally going to learn to crochet... and I did, in about an hour after looking up any explanation of the thing I could find in order to finally wrap my head around the process.

        Good luck!

        • Sonderling
          +2

          Thanks! I think I'm in the same position as you were. All I'm able to really do well is make chains, but whenever I try to branch out and try something more it gets messed up and I just get frustrated. It's good to hear that you were able to learn it, even after so long. Thanks for the words of encouragement. :)

      • thornwind
        +3

        Youtube is great for this! I like Crochet Guru

      • Qukatt
        +2

        I'm on my phone so I cant link but there is a fabby website that is full of excellent clear gifs of the move for each stitch. Gifs so you don't have to keep rewinding youtube videos :)

        Also I'm available on skype to help with any crochet issues if you want, just pm me I will hook you up with my skype details.

        • eightbitsamurai
          +2

          If you can, please send me the link whenever you're able! My sister's learning how to this weekend and I'm sure she could use the resources.

          • Qukatt (edited 3 years ago)
            +2

            found the link for you - http://crochet-gifs.tumblr.com/

            it's an excellent site, i have been crocheting for years and use it occasionally. I recommend it to everyone xD

            Edit: there's a technique I recommend that is not on that site and that's the "Russian join" for joining the start of one ball of wool to the end of the one you were working with. it's a completely invisible join and has no ends to sew into your work which can be awkward depending on your pattern (if you have areas of lacey style crochet chains or Solomon's knots then it's really frustrating to hide ends.) I can't recommend learning the Russian join highly enough :)

            Also being able to read crochet charts which will give you access to the wealth of Russian, Japanese and Spanish patterns out there that are all charted (also for piecing together bits of patterns into what you want to make!)

  • Qukatt
    +4

    Learning some basic knots can literally save your life. Its also fun to do :)

  • ClarkKent
    +4

    Making time to LISTEN to someone for a hour, stop making it about you and your problems and listen to someone close to you. Today in our age we want to be heard instead of doing the listening. Sometimes the best thing to do that helps you is just to listen.

    • [Deleted Profile]

      [This comment was removed]

    • leetmoaf (edited 3 years ago)
      +1

      Agreed. Actively listening to a person can be used to garner a great deal of respect with the speaker.

      In order to ACTIVELY listen, make sure you engage them with questions to show them that you are actually paying attention to what they have to say.

  • Roundcat
    +4

    Learn how to cook or prepare an egg. It will become your go to ingredient. Boring instant noodles? Add a fried or boiled egg. Got rice? Fry that shit up. making a sandwhich? eh, add an egg.

    • Csellite
      +2

      This just made me so hungry.oh so hungry.

  • Chubros
    +3

    How to use google properly, with all the extra filters and functions.

    • Muffintop
      +1

      This. Once you know how to search, you can find answers to just about any question. Also, remember that libraries are great resources, there you can get free access to databases which give you more detailed information on just about anything.

  • PMMeLadyNudes
    +3

    You could learn how to cook a new dish that will expand the range of foods you eat and impress someone you cook it for.

    Or you could learn how to perform a bit of car or house maintenance that will make it easier and cheaper to care for the things you own.

  • robmonk
    +3

    How to open a beer with random objects...

  • Redd06
    +3

    Orange White / Orange / Green White / Blue / Blue White / Green / Brown White / Brown. The basic wiring sequence of network cabling. Buy a box of Cat6, learn to cut and crimp your own wires.

  • geoleo
    +2

    Trying a tie.

    • leetmoaf
      +1

      Man, I always take time to learn how to tie a tie. But then I forget a day later. Every knot except the half Windsor, that is.

      • Muffintop
        +2

        I struggled remembering how to tie a tie as well. I would learn how to do it but forget it immediately after. One thing that helped me is that rabbit and the fox rhyme. I can't find the exact version nor remember where I heard it, but I found this:

        This is how you tie a tie: The rabbit hops over the log, the rabbit crawls under the log, the rabbit runs around the log, one more time—because the rabbit is trying to outsmart the fox, and the rabbit dives into his rabbit hole.

        Or there's a song on Youtube.

        Anyway, ever since that I can tie a tie any time. Happy Ending!

      • anonycon
        +1

        Best way to learn to tie a knot is to find someone who will walk you through it. I found a guy who walked me through tying a double-windsor, and I have pretty much never done anything else. It pops, and people do notice a difference.

        Learning a good bow tie (now that's hard) is nice too.

  • myg
    +1

    Learn to change your windshield wiper blades or a headlight. Very easy to do, but many times you'll be overcharged for minor tasks at a shop. Some people will drive with a light out or with poor visibility because they haven't taken their car to a shop. It's easily preventable!