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  • Analysis
    7 hours ago
    by maelstorm
    +12 +6

    The buried secrets of the deadliest location on Earth

    Chicxulub Puerto, Mexico, is the centre of the impact crater that scientists believe was made when the asteroid that wiped out the dinosaurs smashed into the Earth’s surface.

  • Analysis
    7 hours ago
    by maelstorm
    +17 +4

    Organisms found on hike in the woods are like no other life on Earth

    Canadian researchers have discovered a new kind of organism that’s so different from other living things that it doesn’t fit into the plant kingdom, the animal kingdom, or any other kingdom used to classify known organisms.

  • Current Event
    9 hours ago
    by larylin
    +7 +3

    How Did Life Emerge?

    How did life begin? Two common answers come to mind. One is that, at some point, a deity decided to suspend the laws of physics and will a slew of slimy creatures into being. A second is that a one-in-a-trillion collision of just the right atoms billions of years ago happened to produce a molecular blob with the unprecedented capacity to reproduce itself.

  • Current Event
    4 hours ago
    by Pfennig88
    +3 +1

    Lab-Grown Mini Kidneys 'Go Rogue,' Sprout Brain and Muscle Cells

    Miniature lab-grown kidneys have been hiding something from the scientists who grew them. Instead of developing into different varieties of kidney cells, some of the cells took a different path and became brain and muscle cells. These simple mini kidneys — also known as kidney organoids — are grown from stem cells that are encouraged to develop into clusters of specific kidney cells. But it turns out that the "recipes" that encourage the development of specialized kidney cells were also cranking out cells from other organs, according to a new study.

  • Current Event
    7 hours ago
    by wildcard
    +2 +1

    Correction to climate change study highlights flaws in peer-review process

    "Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence." Scientists and journalists alike were reminded of that oft-quoted phrase by famed cosmologist Carl Sagan when authors of a study published in Nature admitted this week that they needed to issue a correction. The study was widely covered by outlets including The New York Times, The Washington Post, CNN, BBC and Scientific American. While the correction, which has yet to appear, may provide fodder for climate change skeptics, many in the scientific community are praising the authors...

  • Current Event
    15 hours ago
    by zyery
    +10 +2

    Neanderthals Were Just As Violent As Early Humans

    Is it time to put the stereotype of the violent and brutish Neanderthal to rest? New research paints a different picture of the ancient hominin — one that looks similar to Homo sapiens. Researchers previously thought that Neanderthal lives were far more nasty, brutish and short than ancient H. sapiens, based mainly on studies looking at levels of injury among both groups. Now, however, in a much more comprehensive look, a team of University of Tübingen (UIT) researchers found that both Neanderthals and H. sapiens living in the Ice Age sustained similar levels of head trauma.

  • Current Event
    22 hours ago
    by TNY
    +20 +3

    Scientists are using artificial intelligence to see inside stars using sound waves

    How in the world could you possibly look inside a star? You could break out the scalpels and other tools of the surgical trade, but good luck getting within a few million kilometers of the surface before your skin melts off. The stars of our universe hide their secrets very well, but astronomers can outmatch their cleverness and have found ways to peer into their hearts using, of all things, sound waves.

  • Analysis
    1 day ago
    by Apolatia
    +26 +5

    Plans Revealed for Enormous Particle Collider in China

    Scientists this week released a conceptual design report for a next-generation particle accelerator in China, which would serve as a “Higgs boson factory,” as its proponents have called it.

  • Current Event
    1 day ago
    by junglman
    +13 +4

    When Space Science Becomes a Political Liability

    Representative John Culberson, an 8-term Texas Republican and staunch supporter of NASA and planetary exploration, lost his re-election bid to Democrat Lizzie Fletcher last week. Many factors played into this outcome, but one bears consideration by space advocates: his support for the scientific search for life at Europa was seen as a weakness and attacked accordingly.

  • Current Event
    2 days ago
    by canuck
    +22 +3

    The US military is testing stratospheric balloons that ride the wind so they never have to come down

    The idea of a balloon that floats high up above Earth indefinitely is a tantalizing one. Solar power would allow such stratospheric balloons to operate like low-cost satellites at the edge of space, where they could provide communication in remote or disaster-hit area, follow hurricanes, or monitor pollution at sea. One day, they could even take tourists on near-space trips to see the curvature of the planet.

  • Current Event
    3 days ago
    by TNY
    +14 +5

    Maybe Next Time: Barnard’s Star B is Likely Uninhabitable

    Put on your friendliest face and say hello to the newest member of our planetary neighborhood: Barnard’s star b. An international team led by researchers from the Carnegie Institution for Science announced today that they’ve detected an exoplanet orbiting Barnard’s star, the closest single star to Earth at just six light-years away. The astronomers calculate the newfound world, dubbed Barnard’s star b, to be about 3.2 times the mass of Earth and to orbit its host star once every 233 days.

  • Current Event
    2 days ago
    by Nelson
    +15 +2

    'Cut lamb and beef' to fight climate change

    The number of sheep and cattle in the UK should be reduced by between a fifth and a half to help combat climate change, a report says. The shift is needed, the government’s advisory Committee on Climate Change (CCC) maintains, because beef and lamb produce most farm greenhouse gases. The report foresees an increase in the number of pigs and chickens because these produce less methane. The farm union NFU said it did not agree with reducing livestock numbers.

  • Current Event
    1 day ago
    by doodlegirl
    +18 +1

    Scientists Grow Full-Sized, Beating Human Hearts From Stem Cells

    Of the 4,000 Americans waiting for heart transplants, only 2,500 will receive new hearts in the next year. Even for those lucky enough to get a transplant, the biggest risk is the their bodies will reject the new heart and launch a massive immune reaction against the foreign cells. To combat the problems of organ shortage and decrease the chance that a patient’s body will reject it, researchers have been working to create synthetic organs from patients’ own cells.

  • Current Event
    4 days ago
    by grandsalami
    +24 +6

    People are “consistently inconsistent” in how they reason about controversial scientific topics

    There are various issues on which there is a scientific consensus but great public controversy, such as anthropogenic climate change and the safety of vaccines. One previously popular explanation for this mismatch was that an information deficit among the public is to blame. Give people all the facts and then, according to this perspective, the public will catch up with the scientists. Yet time and again, that simply hasn’t happened.

  • Current Event
    3 days ago
    by ppp
    +10 +4

    Why we’re killing the kilogram for a new one

    Nearly every measurement of weight you’ve ever made, from peeking at your bathroom scale to measuring out flour for a recipe, can be traced back to just a single object: a metal kilogram made of platinum and iridium that resides under lock and key in an underground vault in Paris. It’s called the International Prototype Kilogram, or IPK, and since its creation in 1889 it has been the standard by which the world’s weights are defined. But not for much longer.

  • Current Event
    3 days ago
    by tukka
    +11 +3

    Impact crater beneath Greenland could help explain Ice Age

    Most of Earth’s surface has been plotted, mapped and measured. And along the way, scientists have turned up a plethora of craters big and small. But there was always one major crater missingMost of Earth’s surface has been plotted, mapped and measured. And along the way, scientists have turned up a plethora of craters big and small. But there was always one major crater missing.

  • Analysis
    2 days ago
    by LisMan
    +12 +2

    Your Children’s Yellowstone Will Be Radically Different

    Climate change is altering America’s first national park so quickly that plants and animals may not be able to adapt.

  • Analysis
    4 days ago
    by iamsanchez
    +31 +4

    How plants evolved to make ants their servants

    Plants are boring. They just sit there photosynthesizing while animals have all the fun. Right? Not so much. Take a look at the interactions between ants and plants—plants have evolved features specifically to make them enticing to ants, like juicy nectar for the insects to eat and hollow thorns for them to take shelter in. In exchange, plants use ants to spread their seeds and even act as bodyguards.

  • Analysis
    3 days ago
    by estherschindler
    +12 +2

    20 Americans Die Each Day Waiting for Organs. Can Pigs Save Them?

    Thanks to genetically engineered pigs, the donor-organ shortage could soon be a thing of the past.

  • Current Event
    5 days ago
    by spacepopper
    +16 +3

    Quantum 'compass' promises navigation without using GPS

    GPS is vital to modern navigation, but it's extremely fragile. Never mind coverage -- if a satellite fails or there's a jamming attack, it quickly becomes useless. Scientists may have a much more robust answer, though. Scientists have demonstrated a "commercially viable" quantum accelerometer that could provide navigation without GPS or other satellite technology. The device uses lasers to cool atoms to extremely low temperatures, and then measures the quantum wave properties of those atoms as they respond to acceleration.

  • Analysis
    6 days ago
    by gottlieb
    +11 +4

    Ancient genomics is recasting the story of the Americas’ first residents

    Trove of DNA from prehistoric inhabitants reveals that the continents’ early settlers moved far and fast.

  • Current Event
    4 days ago
    by ubthejudge
    +4 +2

    Scientists to swap dusty old kilogram for something more stable

    Just as the redefinition of the second in 1967 helped to ease communication across the world via technologies like GPS and the internet, experts say the change in the kilogram will be better for technology, retail and health - though it probably won’t change the price of fish much.

  • Current Event
    4 days ago
    by spacepopper
    +9 +2

    China has an "Artificial Sun" and it Just Hit 100 Million Degrees Celsius

    China continues to do its best to allay fears about its rise by generating headlines that feel like they’re coming out of the headquarters of The Grinch or, perhaps more timely, a Stan Lee-imagined baddie. The latest? Oh, just the testing of an artificial sun.

  • Analysis
    7 days ago
    by kxh
    +25 +4

    Researchers Report Elsevier to EU Anti-Competition Authority

    Academic publisher Elsevier has repeatedly made the news for its battle with Sci-Hub, the "Pirate Bay" of science. However, while Elsevier is using copyrights to protect its business, academic-insiders accuse the publisher of "anti-competitive" actions.

  • Current Event
    5 days ago
    by TNY
    +16 +2

    Paleontologists brought to tears, laughter by Creation Museum

    For a group of paleontologists, a tour of the Creation Museum seemed like a great tongue-in-cheek way to cap off a serious conference. But while there were a few laughs and some clowning for the camera, most left more offended than amused by the frightening way in which evolution -- and their life's work -- was attacked.

  • Analysis
    4 days ago
    by Chubros
    +6 +2

    Study: People who regularly consume caffeine may experience less sensitivity to pain

    A new study provides evidence that regular caffeine consumption is associated with alterations in the processing of pain signals. The preliminary findings were published in the journal Psychopharmacology. “New research suggests that diet can be a useful intervention for decreasing pain sensitivity and helping people manage pain. Caffeine is a commonly consumed by millions of people as part of their regular diets,” said Burel R. Goodin, an associate professor at the University of Alabama at Birmingham and corresponding author of the study.

  • Current Event
    4 days ago
    by funhonestdude
    +8 +2

    Dark matter hurricane

    There’s a “dark matter hurricane” blowing through our corner of the Milky Way galaxy. Right this second, it’s passing over Earth. And this fast-moving stream could reveal major details about dark matter, a new study finds.

  • Current Event
    6 days ago
    by gottlieb
    +10 +3

    New Research Suggests Genetically Engineered Bacteria Could Transform Mars Into A Habitable Planet

    Students at Exeter University have successfully demonstrated that genetically engineered bacteria could help to create breathable air on Mars when combined with perchlorate salts. Students from Exeter University have suggested that genetically engineered bacteria has the possibility to completely transform Mars and create a habitable planet that has breathable air after new research conducted in a lab showed that salts that can be retrieved from Martian soil could help to fuel this process.

  • Analysis
    2 days ago
    by cobrajuicy
    +1 +1

    Can Toad Venom Unlock The Mystery Of Neurogenesis? New Insights on 5-MeO-DMT | Psychedelic Times

    2018 has been an incredible time for advances in psychedelic research, including psilocybin mushrooms, ketamine and more, not to mention a landmark year for MDMA and cannabis. Meanwhile, some research on a much lesser known psychedelic, 5-MeO-DMT, has slipped past national attention. Known as 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine, this potent little molecule is most famous for occurring in …

  • Analysis
    8 days ago
    by tukka
    +14 +4

    Healing kidneys with nanotechnology

    Each year, there are some 13.3 million new cases of acute kidney injury (AKI), a serious affliction. Formerly known as acute renal failure, the ailment produces a rapid buildup of nitrogenous wastes and decreases urine output, usually within hours or days of disease onset. Severe complications often ensue. Currently, there is no known cure for AKI.

  • Current Event
    2 days ago
    by timex
    +8 +1

    Impact crater 19 miles wide found beneath Greenland glacier

    An illustration of the ice-filled crater discovered in Greenland. Photograph: Nasa/Cryospheric Sciences Lab/Natural History Museum of Denmark A huge impact crater has been discovered under a half-mile-thick Greenland ice sheet. The enormous bowl-shaped dent appears to be the result of a mile-wide iron meteorite slamming into the island at a speed of 12 miles per second as recently as 12,000 years ago.

  • Current Event
    6 days ago
    by socialiguana
    +19 +2

    NASA's Curiosity Rover on Mars Is Rolling (and Drilling) Again

    After suffering a couple technical glitches that have put NASA's Curiosity rover off its duties on Mars this year, the robotic explorer seems to be back in full health, having driven to a new site and drilled a sampling hole, according to NASA statements. That hole is its 18th successful drilling assignment, according to NASA. It targeted a type of rock geologists with the mission have been eyeing for more than a month, but failed to successfully drill at a previous site. The drill was out of commission between late 2016 and this May as engineers addressed a problem with the instrument.

  • Current Event
    3 days ago
    by geoleo
    +8 +1

    'Super-Earth' discovered orbiting Sun's nearest star

    A “super-Earth” has been discovered orbiting the closest single star to our Sun, scientists said Wednesday in a breakthrough that could shine a light on Earth’s nearest planetary neighbours. Astronomers studied Barnard’s Star, a red dwarf just six light years away — practically in our back garden, galactically speaking — and noticed the presence of a “frozen, dimly lit world” at least 3.2 times heavier than Earth.

  • Current Event
    8 days ago
    by grandtheftsoul
    +15 +3

    Scientists push back against Harvard 'alien spacecraft' theory

    A scientific paper led by two researchers at Harvard University made a splash this week by claiming that a cigar-shaped rock zooming through our solar system may have been sent by aliens. The researchers noted in a pre-print of the article that it was an "exotic scenario," but that "Oumuamua may be a fully operational probe sent intentionally to Earth vicinity by an alien civilization."

  • Current Event
    8 days ago
    by Pfennig88
    +15 +3

    The most reliable scientific model to date for detecting when a person is lying, based on thermography

    Researchers from the University of Granada (UGR) have designed the most accurate laboratory model to date for determining if a person is lying or telling the truth. This method, which uses thermography techniques, is based on the so‑called ‘Pinocchio Effect’: when a person is lying, the temperature of the nose decreases while that of the forehead increases, among other facial thermal changes.