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StarFlower's feed

  • 5 days ago
    Comment StarFlower

    An account of the horrific ramifications that government and business entities can put onto individual civilians by simply not thinking about what they're doing.

  • 5 days ago
    Comment StarFlower

    It sounds impractical and rather annoying, especially to anyone who is doing any astronomy. Not to mention, they say the material is supposed to be non-toxic and it's supposed to burn up in atmosphere (as opposed to hitting the earth), but how do we know it really will? I think we have enough near-misses from asteroids that we don't need to actually shoot pellets at our planet. Also, even if pellets don't hit the ground, what about international airplanes? What if some of these pellets hit the aircraft as they are burning up?

    The whole thing sounds like a bad idea.

  • 5 days ago
    Comment StarFlower

    While I don't like to keep unneeded items and I do regularly donate clothing I no longer need, I have to say I don't really agree with the sentiment of only keeping things "that spark joy" - it's not very practical. As much as I hate past years' tax paperwork, I won't be throwing it out!

    The title is a little misleading. This is because maybe some of the increase in donations could be due to the Netflix show, but it's quite possible that this January weather is a little better than last year's and people are following through on their New Year's resolutions to actually donate unwanted items (instead of being put off because of snow etc). They do point out this possibility in the article, but I feel they could therefore have picked a more accurate headline.

  • 5 days ago
    Comment StarFlower

    I've never been a fan of RSS. I don't know why, but I just never got the point of it.

  • 5 days ago
    Comment StarFlower

    A well-researched article about the pressures kids have today. I do agree that the instant spread of notifications even in non-social-media stuff isn't the healthiest environment for kids. It seems hard that school scores and stuff are handled as push notifications. Then again, I'm wondering if there is something that parents and kids can do to make that easier, to let the kid have control over when stuff comes into their phones?

    For example, if the school app gives users the option to decline push notification and go to, say, email notifications, would that be helpful?

    Also, another precaution kids can take is to remove auto-sync from email. Manually syncing email (by opening up the email app and dragging down to force-check fro new emails) is a way that kids can control WHEN they'll see new emails. This is actually how I do it myself, allowing me to have control of when emails come to my attention. OK, sometimes I sync it more often than an auto-sync would... but other times, it goes the other way and I'm glad that I'm not being interrupted by hearing a notification that I've got new mail.

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  • 13 days ago
    Comment StarFlower

    Yeah. At the time, when I looked at data usage by apps on my phone and saw it chewing through my data allocation, I naively put it down to extremely inefficient programming by app developers. (And that alone would be enough for me to delete the app) - but later when I read about apps like The Weather Channel tracking users, then I realized that this was what was going on instead.

    Now, I periodically review the breakdown of data usage by app on my phone. Anything that uses more data than it should, I delete. Basically anything that uses more than my browser (the app I use most often) I will delete. This is not a complete guard against privacy-violating apps, but I figure that it at least will help me identify any big red flags.

  • 2 weeks ago
    Comment StarFlower

    I'm not a big fan of Apple's restrictive practices. This sort of thing is exactly why I don't own (and would never buy) an Apple device.

  • 2 weeks ago
    Comment StarFlower

    An interesting and well-researched article. Definitely I agree that Instagram is something that takes a lot more time than it "should". I stopped using it awhile back and have never missed it. I was never really all that much into it, but even posting a simple photo was annoying with all the hashtags and stuff. Plus, it takes so much effort to get any traction on Instagram that it's not at all worth it - I have better uses for my time.

  • 2 weeks ago
    Comment StarFlower

    This does not surprise me. I had the Weather Channel app sometime last year, and it was using up huge amounts of data, much more than it should have, so I deleted it and chose another app. I had location turned off, but even so it was sending lots of data back and forth. A weather app should not need to do that.

  • 1 month ago
    Comment StarFlower

    Very well-prepared. I hope other countries are also having some sort of plan to prepare for floods and/or rising sea levels. It's either that, or businesses are going to move inland and away from coastal areas, taking jobs with them.

  • 1 month ago
    Comment StarFlower

    This is too little, too late for me. I suspect they're probably finally taking action because lots of users left. I left for exactly the reason that I was getting adult content in my feed.

    And no, that is not my problem, that is Tumblr's problem. It is EXACTLY the same problem as if I hated cars and loved cats, but my feed was full of cars but no cats in sight. Tumblr was not giving me things that match my interests, so I left. Doesn't matter if the unwanted content is adult content, cats, cars or something else.

  • 1 month ago
    Comment StarFlower

    Wow! A fascinating and well-researched article.

  • 1 month ago
    Comment StarFlower

    Reading this article, this reminds me of the same issue as global warming. "Humans must, but fail to, take action against global warming."

  • 1 month ago
    Review StarFlower

    The 17 Most Dangerous Airports In The World And Why You Must Experience Them

    A complete guide to the world's scariest airport landings and takeoffs where only specially trained pilots are allowed to fly.

  • 1 month ago
    Comment StarFlower

    I was amazed that there was, in fact, a new low for Facebook to sink to.

  • 1 month ago
    Comment StarFlower

    A great article with wonderful photos about a topic that isn't really covered much. This definitely kept my interest.

  • 1 month ago
    Comment StarFlower

    I'm surprised the writer ever saw Zuckerberg as an underdog in the movie. The movie portrays Zuckerberg (rightly or wrongly; I don't know) as an arrogant jerk, and paints the Winkelvoss twins in a much better light. When I watched it, I was really glad I wasn't on Facebook, and I was glad I never worked for Facebook. If anything in there was true, I didn't want anything to do with Facebook.

    I'm not saying the movie was portraying people accurately or not, I have no way of knowing, but I was surprised that the writer saw Zuckerberg in even a mildly positive light in that movie when watching it the first time.

  • 2 months ago
    Comment StarFlower

    I do use it as a drop-in replacement for Windows (and I don't use Mac). No dual-boot. So, I use Linux exclusively for everything I do.

    That said, I 100% agree with the issue of fragmentation, that was raised by the author in the article. I spoke to a software developer one time, and he expressed frustration with the idea of developing software for Linux because of the need for different versions for different flavors of Linux.

    That being said, there is a huge amount of different software made for Linux - in some ways even more than for other platforms. For example, want to program in just about any programming language? There's almost certainly a version of it for Linux. The same can not be said true of Mac or Windows. Another point supporting that is even with the different package managers around, pick just one - Synaptic for example - and browse it. There's probably a lot more available there, and for free, than there is reliable freeware for Mac or Windows.

    Lastly, one thing the author did not consider mentioning was the relatively common usage of Ubuntu and Ubuntu-based distros. I don't have figures for this, but I have noticed when installing software, that if a software is made for Windows, Mac and Linux, instead of making 5 different Linux versions, some developers opt to make one Linux version, and in that case it's usually Ubuntu-compatible. So, I'm wondering if, over time, Ubuntu and Ubuntu-based distros will eventually become a sort of "standard" Linux for developers to develop for.

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  • 2 months ago
    Comment StarFlower

    Very insightful! I agree. I'd never thought of it for that, but yes, it's ideal for that sector of the population too.

  • 2 months ago
    Comment StarFlower

    WOW. This article is incredible. What a wonderful concept.

  • 2 months ago
    Related Link StarFlower

    The video game that helped me understand my grandma's dementia

    StarFlower added 1 related link(s)

    There are a total of 1 items in the related links
  • 2 months ago
    Analysis StarFlower

    Privilege Escalation Flaw In WP GDPR Compliance Plugin Exploited In The Wild

    After its removal from the WordPress plugin repository yesterday, the popular plugin WP GDPR Compliance released version 1.4.3, an update which patched multiple critical vulnerabilities. At the time of this writing, the plugin has been reinstated in the WordPress repository and has over 100,000 active installs. The reported vulnerabilities allow unauthenticated attackers to achieve privilege escalation, allowing them to further infect vulnerable sites. Any sites making use of this plugin should...

  • 2 months ago
    Comment StarFlower

    I completely agree.

  • 2 months ago
    Comment StarFlower

    A very interesting topic. I would have liked to see the journalism cover a little more detail, such as whether heating or plumbing is modified in any special ways compared to standard sized homes.

  • 2 months ago
    Comment StarFlower

    This is encouraging, storing potential energy in the form of lifting up a brick. Later when needed, it can be released as kinetic energy.