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  • Current Event
    2 weeks ago
    by grandsalami
    +21 +5

    Trump’s USDA Is Letting Factories With Troubling Safety Records Slaughter Chickens Even Faster

    Sixty miles northeast of Atlanta, a chicken statue atop a 25-foot monument proclaims the small city of Gainesville, Georgia, the “Poultry Capital of the World.” In the rolling hills outside of town, white feathers trail the trucks turning into a slaughterhouse operated by a local company called Fieldale Farms.

  • Current Event
    3 weeks ago
    by zyery
    +23 +5

    Before Trump, Cambridge Analytica’s parent built weapons for war

    How the parent company of Trump’s campaign firm plied its skills on the battlefield and in elections, while working for the U.S., the U.K., and NATO.

  • Expression
    3 weeks ago
    by wildcat
    +15 +3

    Chernobyl 'Hero' : Dr. Gale--Medical Maverick

    Since his first official house call to the Soviet Union in the spring of 1986, Dr. Robert Peter Gale, the 42-year-old UCLA bone-marrow transplant specialist, has become nothing short of an international celebrity.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by ubthejudge
    +17 +4

    One small step: What will the moon look like in 50 years?

    When the first astronomers turned their eyes to the heavens tens of thousands of years ago, their view was unobscured by the glow of city lights. At night, a pristine black sheet stretched across an unreachable ceiling overhead. The centerpiece of this ancient nightscape was a flat gray disc that hung in the sky: the moon.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by manix
    +13 +4

    The Mysterious Death Of The Hacker Who Turned In Chelsea Manning

    Debbie Scroggin and her husband live at the end of a series of gravel roads in a lonesome part of Kansas. It is the kind of place where, Debbie says, "you have to drive 15 minutes to get anywhere." Getting to the Scroggin house involves turning onto a desolate ribbon of gravel that cuts through fields as far as the eye can see. It was easy to think that someone might come here to either get lost or be forgotten. Scroggin remembers Adrian Lamo arriving on a night train with nothing but a broken suitcase and a hangdog expression.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by dianep
    +21 +6

    How a flawed idea is teaching millions of kids to be poor readers

    For decades, schools have taught children the strategies of struggling readers, using a theory about reading that cognitive scientists have repeatedly debunked. And many teachers and parents don't know there's anything wrong with it.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by socialiguana
    +16 +4

    The Human Cost of Amazon’s Fast, Free Shipping

    When she added Gabrielle’s name to the chart in her kitchen, Judy Kennedy could picture the annual ritual. At birthdays she would ask her newest grandchild to stand up straight, heels against the door frame, so she could mark Gabrielle’s height beside that of her other granddaughter in the Maine house the family has lived in since the 1800s. But there are no lines for Gabrielle.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by doodlegirl
    +15 +4

    Ship of horrors: life and death on the lawless high seas

    On the night of 14 August 2010, the captain of a South Korean trawler, the Oyang 70, left Port Chalmers, New Zealand, for what would be his final journey. The ship was bound for fishing grounds about 400 miles east in the southern Pacific Ocean. When it arrived three days later, the captain, a 42-year-old man named Shin Hyeon-gi, ordered his crew to cast the net over the vessel’s rusty stern.

  • Expression
    1 month ago
    by baron778
    +14 +4

    How donuts fuelled the American Dream

    The most visible donut in Los Angeles floats above the corner of La Cienega and Manchester Boulevards in Inglewood. Thirty-two-and-a-half feet in diameter and painted an unearthly yellow, it is perched on the roof of a single-storey bakery called Randy’s Donuts, where it has captured the attention of motorists since 1954.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by doodlegirl
    +20 +4

    Hello From the Year 2050. We Avoided the Worst of Climate Change — But Everything Is Different

    Let’s imagine for a moment that we’ve reached the middle of the century. It’s 2050, and we have a moment to reflect—the climate fight remains the consuming battle of our age, but its most intense phase may be in our rearview mirror. And so we can look back to see how we might have managed to dramatically change our society and economy. We had no other choice.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by bkool
    +22 +7

    ‘We Have Fire Everywhere’: Escaping California’s Deadliest Blaze

    For eight hours last fall, Paradise, Calif., became a zone at the limits of the American imagination — and a preview of the American future. The fire was already growing at a rate of one football field per second when Tamra Fisher woke up on the edge of Paradise, Calif., feeling that her life was no longer insurmountably strenuous or unpleasant and that she might be up to the challenge of living it again.

  • Expression
    2 months ago
    by kong88
    +27 +8

    The Great Land Robbery

    “you ever chop before?” Willena Scott-White was testing me. I sat with her in the cab of a Chevy Silverado pickup truck, swatting at the squadrons of giant, fluttering mosquitoes that had invaded the interior the last time she opened a window. I was spending the day with her family as they worked their fields just outside Ruleville, in Mississippi’s Leflore County. With her weathered brown hands, Scott-White gave me a pork sandwich wrapped in a grease-stained paper towel. I slapped my leg. Mosquitoes can bite through denim, it turns out.

  • Expression
    2 months ago
    by jcscher
    +24 +4

    Three Years of Misery Inside Google, the Happiest Company in Tech

    Sexual harassment. Hate speech. Employee walkouts. The Silicon Valley giant is trapped in a war against itself. And there’s no end in sight.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by zobo
    +19 +5

    Why Is Everyone Always Stealing Black Music?

    I’ve got a friend who’s an incurable Pandora guy, and one Saturday while we were making dinner, he found a station called Yacht Rock. “A tongue-in-cheek name for the breezy sounds of late ’70s/early ’80s soft rock” is Pandora’s definition, accompanied by an exhortation to “put on your Dockers, pull up a deck chair and relax.” With a single exception, the passengers aboard the yacht were all dudes.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by socialiguana
    +27 +3

    A.I. Is Learning From Humans. Many Humans.

    Namita Pradhan sat at a desk in downtown Bhubaneswar, India, about 40 miles from the Bay of Bengal, staring at a video recorded in a hospital on the other side of the world. The video showed the inside of someone’s colon. Ms. Pradhan was looking for polyps, small growths in the large intestine that could lead to cancer. When she found one — they look a bit like a slimy, angry pimple — she marked it with her computer mouse and keyboard, drawing a digital circle around the tiny bulge.

  • Current Event
    2 weeks ago
    by darvinhg
    +4 +1

    The secret tapes of Khashoggi's murder

    I walked along a tree-lined street in a quiet area of Istanbul and approached a cream-coloured villa, decked with CCTV cameras. A year ago, an exiled Saudi journalist took the same journey. Jamal Khashoggi was caught on CCTV. It would be the last image of him.

  • Expression
    9 months ago
    by rhingo
    +31 +8

    How I let drinking take over my life

    The long read: Five years after his last taste of alcohol, William Leith tries to understand its powerful magic

  • Current Event
    9 months ago
    by geoleo
    +26 +8

    Are we city dwellers or hunter-gatherers?

    For centuries, we have been telling ourselves a simple story about the origins of social inequality. For most of their history, humans lived in tiny egalitarian bands of hunter-gatherers. Then came farming, which brought with it private property, and then the rise of cities which meant the emergence of civilisation properly speaking. Civilisation meant many bad things (wars, taxes, bureaucracy, patriarchy, slavery) but also made possible written literature, science, philosophy and most other great human achievements.

  • Current Event
    9 months ago
    by zritic
    +34 +10

    The World Is Choking on Digital Pollution

    Tens of thousands of Londoners died of cholera from the 1830s to the 1860s. The causes were simple: mass quantities of human waste and industrial contaminants were pouring into the Thames, the central waterway of a city at the center of a rapidly industrializing world. The river gave off an odor so rank that Queen Victoria once had to cancel a leisurely boat ride. By the summer of 1858, Parliament couldn’t hold hearings due to the overwhelming stench coming through the windows.

  • Analysis
    8 months ago
    by aj0690
    +33 +7

    Protein mania: the rich world’s new diet obsession

    The long read: If you’re worrying about the amount of protein in your diet, then you’re almost certainly eating more than enough