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+3
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What distribution do you use for gaming?

I am currently running Linux Mint 17.2. I tried Ubuntu but I've never liked Unity as much as Cinnamon.

What distribution are you using and why do you recommend it?

4 years ago by Schwut with 17 comments

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  • microfracture
    +4

    I personally use Arch Linux. I recommend it because of its KISS philosophy.
    You start off with just the console and it gives you the freedom to customize your install to your liking from there by installing only the packages that you want.

    • gabe2068 (edited 4 years ago)
      +1

      The only thing I don't like is that it takes so long to install. I wouldn't mind it if I had more time or a different computer to look at the commands from but I don't. Is their an installer that will take you past all the annoying parts?

      Edit: I've installed arch manually before, was bored for several hours.

      • microfracture (edited 4 years ago)
        +2

        Arch doesn't have an official installer these days (It used to long ago though). There are some user-made installer scripts around, but I have never used them so I can't really recommend any.

        However, there is a fork of Arch called Antegros which does have a GUI installer. Aside from the installer and an additional repository it is pretty much a standard Arch system.

        • Schwut (edited 4 years ago)
          +1

          I don't know how I've never heard of Antergos. Do you/have you ever used it or would you recommend just using Arch if you're capable?

          • microfracture
            +1

            I personally use and recommend Arch for anyone who wants a rolling release system (and Debian for everything else).

            However, a lot of people want an Arch-based system, but don't really want to deal with setting everything up manually and for those people I do recommend Antegros. It is essentially a hassle free fork which gets everything setup for you with minimal effort on your part (and will even install your preferred DE or WM of choice and their respective applications if you wish).

            I've played around with it in the past and as I stated above the only real differences between the two is that Antegros has a nice GUI installer and adds on an extra repository which I believe you can remove without any issues. All the packages and various core repositories are straight from Arch.

            • Schwut (edited 4 years ago)
              +1

              This is really cool! I've been reading some stuff in their forums for a little while now and now the only problem is that I'm seriously considering swapping distros again, and the only two that I've really seriously ever used before are Ubuntu and Mint. Do you think that there will be a steep learning curve switching from something ease of use oriented to Arch?

              Edit: I've mad up my mind. I'm going to start the installation now. :D

    • Schwut
      +1

      I've used Arch Linux before and I really liked it. The only problem is that I can be pretty stupid and tend to mess something up. Whenever I mess something up I instantly get the urge to start from scratch. It's much easier to start from scratch using a pre-built. :)

  • Natte
    +3

    I'm running Ubuntu 14.04 LTS right now since, aside from Arch, it's the only distro that just seems to work with my old, crappy hardware. But I'm planning on going back to XFCE instead of Unity. Mainly because opening the Unity launcher doesn't bring me to my applications right away, I either have to search for what I want or click through to applications > expand all applications before I can open whatever I'm looking for.

    • Schwut
      +1

      I understand what you mean with Unity. A lot of people enjoy it but I've really just never liked it.

  • rothelys
    +3

    Right now I'm on Arch with XFCE. I would only recommend it if you are willing to learn (sometimes be frustrated with an Optimus Laptop like mine). I tried many distributions over time (incl. Mint, Ubuntu, Fedora, openSuSE, and so on), but I stayed at Arch cause i feel like I'm having full control from the beginning and can find a solution for problems way faster as with a "pre-build" system.

    • Schwut
      +2

      I'd also like to point out that if you are willing to learn there are VERY detailed guides and tutorials available for Arch for nearly anything that you can think of. They have a very strong, supportive community.

  • Cloptologist
    +2

    Linux Mint 17.1 with LXDE and Openbox. I originally was using Cinnamon as my DE, but I changed it to LXDE in order to get the maximum FPS possible for CS:GO.

    • Schwut
      +2

      I'm using 17.2 with Cinnamon right now. How much of an increase did you see by switching to LXDE?

      • Cloptologist
        +1

        With Cinnamon I was getting 120-160. With LXDE I'm getting 180-250. Not sure exactly was it was with Cinnamon that was causing the fps loss though.

  • stuntman782
    +2

    I am using Debian Jessie, with the Wally setup script provided by the guys at BunsenLabs, right now. Before that I used to use #!.