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  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by darvinhg
    +33 +5

    Scientists detect biggest known black-hole collision

    An international team of scientists have detected ripples in space and time, known as gravitational waves, from the biggest known black-hole collision that formed a new black hole about 80 times larger than the Sun – and from another three black-hole mergers. The Australian National University (ANU) is playing a lead role in Australia’s involvement with the gravitational wave discovery through a partnership in the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO), which is based in the United States.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by darvinhg
    +24 +5

    A 5,000-year-old mass grave harbors the oldest plague bacteria ever found

    A long-dead Scandinavian woman has yielded bacterial DNA showing that she contracted the earliest known case of the plague in humans. DNA extracted from the woman’s teeth comes from a newly identified ancient strain of Yersinia pestis, the bacterium that causes plague, the oldest ever found. The woman’s bones, which date from 5,040 to 4,867 years ago, were found nearly 20 years ago in a mass grave at an ancient farming site in Sweden.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by geoleo
    +13 +4

    Largest collision of black holes ever detected by scientists

    A team of scientists have detected the gravitational waves that resulted from the largest collision of black holes ever observed and that formed a new black hole about eighty times larger than the sun. This and 3 other black hole fusions were detected by an international team of scientists formed by the Advanced laser interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) in the U.S. and the Australian National University (ANU) in Canberra, Efe news reported on Tuesday.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by kong88
    +18 +6

    Exclusive: Controversial skeleton may be a new species of early human

    More than twenty years after it was first discovered, an analysis of a remarkable skeleton discovered in South Africa has finally been published – and the specimen suggests we may need to add a new species to the family tree of early human ancestors. The analysis also found evidence that the species was evolving to become better at striding on two legs, helping us to understand when our lineage first became bipedal. The specimen, nicknamed “Little Foot”, is a type of Australopithecus, the group of hominins to which the famous fossil “Lucy” belonged.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by jedlicka
    +18 +3

    MIT Develops New Way to Help Blood Cells Regenerate Faster

    Patients with blood cancers such as leukemia and lymphoma are often treated by irradiating their bone marrow to destroy the diseased cells. After the treatment, patients are vulnerable to infection and fatigue until new blood cells grow back. MIT researchers have now devised a way to help blood cells regenerate faster. Their method involves stimulating a particular type of stem cell to secrete growth factors that help precursor cells differentiate into mature blood cells.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by wetwilly87
    +12 +3

    Scientists: World's Oldest Large-Predator Dinosaur Was Italian

    Saltriovenator is the first Italian dinosaur of the Jurassic age and the only dinosaur found in the Lombardy region. Wednesday Italian paleontologists presented evidence that the world’s oldest large-predator dinosaur inhabited the European country some 200 million years ago. "Saltriovenator predates the massive meat-eating dinosaurs by over 25 million years and sheds light on the evolution of the three-fingered hand of birds," Dal Sasso of Milan's Natural History Museum said in a statement.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by rexall
    +19 +3

    Scientists Find A Brain Circuit That Could Explain Seasonal Depression

    Research suggests the winter blues are triggered by specialized light-sensing cells in the retina that communicate directly with brain areas involved in mood.Just in time for the winter solstice, scientists may have figured out how short days can lead to dark moods. Two recent studies suggest the culprit is a brain circuit that connects special light-sensing cells in the retina with brain areas that affect whether you are happy or sad. When these cells detect shorter days...

  • Analysis
    1 month ago
    by ubthejudge
    +8 +3

    Physicists puzzled by strange numbers that could explain reality

    Is our reality, including its forces and particles, based on the strange properties of numbers with eight dimensions called "octonions"? A physicist thinks so, having found a way to expand 40-year-old research to reach surprising new directions. First, a brief history of numbers.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by geoleo
    +14 +2

    Scientists Find the 'Missing' Dark Matter from the Early Universe

    Dark matter, it seems, has been clinging to galaxies for a very long time. Most galaxies that existed 10 billion years ago had about as much dark matter as galaxies do today, contradicting earlier studies that suggested less dark matter lurked around galaxies in the early universe.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by wetwilly87
    +19 +3

    Bevy of mysterious fast radio bursts spotted by Canadian telescope

    A radio telescope in Canada has proved its mettle in finding many new examples of fast radio bursts (FRBs) — giving astronomers one of their best shots yet at unraveling the mystery of these cosmic flashes. “Look! We see FRBs,” Deborah Good, an astronomer at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada, told a meeting of the American Astronomical Society in Seattle, Washington, on 7 January.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by geoleo
    +10 +2

    Scientists may have just seen birth of a black hole for the first time ever

    Scientists might have seen a black hole being born for the first time ever. A mysterious bright object that lit up the night sky could have been a black hole or neutron star at the moment of its creation, researchers say. The bright glow – spotted from Earth, 200 million light years away – appears to have been the debris of a bright star being swirled around the edge of a black hole. Scientists have been puzzled by the spectacularly bright anomaly spotted deep in space since it was spotted last June.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by lexi6
    +3 +2

    System has four stars and a planet-forming disk oriented vertically

    Models and observations indicate that both stars and planets form as a cloud of material collapses into a disk. If the process proceeds in an orderly manner, then the planets will all form from the same disk and thus orbit in the same plane. And—because material from the same disk will fall into the star, bringing its momentum with it—the star will rotate with its equator along the same plane. That should lead to a tidy system with the equator of the star lined up with the plane of any planets orbiting it.

  • Current Event
    3 weeks ago
    by wildcard
    +13 +1

    Nanotechnology enables engineers to weld previously un-weldable aluminum alloy

    An aluminum alloy developed in the 1940s has long held promise for use in automobile manufacturing, except for one key obstacle. Although it's nearly as strong as steel and just one-third the weight, it is almost impossible to weld together using the technique commonly used to assemble body panels or engine parts.

  • Analysis
    3 weeks ago
    by cone
    +2 +1

    Neanderthal hunting spears could kill at a distance

    The study, published in Scientific Reports, examined the performance of replicas of the 300,000 year old Schöningen spears - the oldest weapons reported in archaeological records - to identify whether javelin throwers could use them to hit a target at distance. Dr Annemieke Milks (UCL Institute of Archaeology), who led the study, said: “This study is important because it adds to a growing body of evidence that Neanderthals were technologically savvy and had the ability to hunt big game...

  • Current Event
    3 weeks ago
    by dianep
    +2 +1

    Dark Energy Gets Weirder: Mysterious Force May Vary Over Time

    Dark energy is apparently even more mysterious than astronomers had thought. Scientists first proposed the existence of this invisible force two decades ago, to explain the surprising discovery that the universe's expansion is accelerating. (Surprising and incredibly important; the find netted three researchers the Nobel Prize in physics in 2011.)

  • Current Event
    3 weeks ago
    by ticktack
    +3 +1

    Earth's Magnetic Field Nearly Disappeared 565 Million Years Ago

    Five hundred and sixty-five million years ago, Earth's magnetic field almost disappeared. But a geological phenomenon might have saved it, a new study suggests. Earth's then-liquid core likely began to solidify around that time, which strengthened the field, the group reported yesterday (Jan. 28) in the journal Nature Geoscience. This is important because the magnetic field protects our planet and its inhabitants from harmful radiation and solar winds — streams of plasma particles thrown our way by the sun.

  • Current Event
    11 months ago
    by geoleo
    +22 +10

    A Deserted, Pristine Stretch of the Amazon was Home to a Million Humans

    At twice the size of India, the Amazon is massive. But although it constitutes the world’s largest remaining tropical rainforest and hosts 10 percent of the world’s biodiversity and over 30 million humans, 95 percent of it remains unexplored. The terre firme is uncharted, and, according to a new paper, it hides many archaeological secrets.

  • Current Event
    9 months ago
    by robmonk
    +30 +8

    Astronomers Discover Monster Black Hole the Size of 20 Billion Suns

    Astronomers using cutting-edge skywatching devices have identified an extremely fast-growing black hole, cataloging it as a ‘monster’ that eats the mass equivalent of our sun every two days.

  • Current Event
    8 months ago
    by Nelson
    +20 +5

    New type of photosynthesis discovered

    The discovery changes our understanding of the basic mechanism of photosynthesis and should rewrite the textbooks. It will also tailor the way we hunt for alien life and provide insights into how we could engineer more efficient crops that take advantage of longer wavelengths of light.

  • Current Event
    7 months ago
    by TNY
    +12 +4

    One 'Oddball' Among 12 Newfound Moons Discovered Orbiting Jupiter

    Scientists have discovered 12 previously unknown moons orbiting Jupiter, and one of them is a real oddball. While hunting for the proposed Planet Nine, a massive planet that some believe could lie beyond Pluto, a team of scientists, led by Scott Sheppard from the Carnegie Institution for Science, found the 12 moons orbiting Jupiter. With this discovery, Jupiter now has a staggering 79 known orbiting moons — more than any other planet in the solar system.

  • Current Event
    7 months ago
    by lexi6
    +15 +4

    Neanderthal man knew how to make fire, study of stone tools up to 50,000 years old indicates

    Neanderthal man knew how to make a fire by striking stone to create sparks, researchers said Thursday after analyzing several tools found at sites in France dating from 50,000 years ago. It was already known that Neanderthals used fire but it was mostly thought to have occurred by natural causes such as lightning or volcanic eruptions, although perhaps they did know techniques for creating a flame.

  • Current Event
    7 months ago
    by belangermira
    +28 +6

    David Bowie's first demo track discovered in old bread basket

    Long before Aladdin Sane or Ziggy Stardust, a skinny 16-year-old with ambitions to be a saxophonist agreed to do lead vocals on a demo track, in a small studio in south London. Now the only known recording of the resulting session, with David Bowie singing I Never Dreamed with his first band, The Konrads, has resurfaced in an old bread basket, and is expected to fetch £10,000 at auction.

  • Current Event
    6 months ago
    by geoleo
    +17 +4

    First fossilized snake embryo ever discovered rewrites history of ancient snakes

    The first-ever discovery of an ancient snake embryo, preserved in 105-million-year-old amber, provides important new information on the evolution of modern snakes, according to a new study led by University of Alberta paleontologists. “This snake is linked to ancient snakes from Argentina, Africa, India and Australia,” explained paleontologist Michael Caldwell, lead author and professor in the Department of Biological Sciences. “It is an important—and until now, missing—component of understanding snake evolution from southern continents, that is Gondwana, in the mid-Mesozoic.”

  • Current Event
    6 months ago
    by distant
    +16 +3

    'Priceless' 2,800-year-old 'royal gold jewellery' stash boasting some 3,000 items is found inside a burial mound in remote Kazakhstan mountains

    An astonishing stash of 2,800-year-old gold jewellery has been unearthed by archaeologists in Kazakhstan. Some 3,000 golden and precious items were found in a burial mound in the remote Tarbagatai mountains. The treasure trove - described as 'priceless' - is believed to belong to royal or elite members of the Saka people who held sway in central Asia eight centuries before the birth of Christ.

  • Current Event
    6 months ago
    by TNY
    +18 +5

    New Lung Cell Type Discovered

    In separate studies published online in Nature on Aug. 1, two independent research teams report the discovery of a new, rare type of cell in the human airway. These cells appear to be the primary source of activity of the CFTR gene, mutations to which cause cystic fibrosis, a multiorgan disease that affects more than 70,000 people worldwide.

  • Current Event
    6 months ago
    by Pfennig88
    +14 +3

    Astronomers report the most distant radio galaxy ever discovered

    After nearly 20 years, the record of the most distant radio galaxy ever discovered has been broken. A team led by Ph.D. student Aayush Saxena (Leiden Observatory, the Netherlands) has found a radio galaxy from a time when the universe was only 7 percent of its current age, at a distance of 12 billion light-years.

  • Current Event
    6 months ago
    by funhonestdude
    +17 +4

    Scientists create mineral that can remove CO2 pollution from the atmosphere

    Though still in preliminary stages, scientists welcome 'big step forward' in efforts to reduce greenhouse gas levels and curtail climate change.

  • Current Event
    6 months ago
    by belangermira
    +8 +3

    Hottest of 'ultra-hot' planets is so hot its air contains vaporised metal

    New observations of the hottest known planet have revealed temperatures similar to those typically seen at the surface of a star, as well as an atmosphere of vaporised iron and titanium. The findings add to the diverse and, in some cases, extreme conditions seen on planets far beyond our own solar system. Kevin Heng, a professor at the University of Bern, and co-author of the latest work, said: “The temperatures are so insane that even though it is a planet it has the atmosphere of a star.”

  • Current Event
    6 months ago
    by Chubros
    +19 +3

    Scientists sequence wheat genome in breakthrough once thought 'impossible'

    Sequencing the wheat genome – once considered by scientists to be an insurmountable task – has been achieved through a worldwide collaboration of researchers spanning 13 years. On Friday the International Wheat Genome Sequencing Consortium (IWGSC) published a detailed description of the genome of bread wheat in the journal Science.

  • Current Event
    6 months ago
    by geoleo
    +16 +4

    U.K. heatwave reveals ancient buried ruins

    Weeks of dry, hot weather have exposed the outlines of several archeological sites across the U.K., dating back thousands of years. Drier soil conditions have allowed archeologists to capture aerial photographs of previously hidden features from ancient times, to reveal farms, burial monuments, ditches, walls and vegetation patterns, or cropmarks. The patterns of these structures can be seen from the air as the vegetation dies back in dry conditions.

  • Current Event
    6 months ago
    by TNY
    +18 +5

    A galaxy 11.3 billion light-years away appears filled with dark matter

    A distant galaxy appears filled with dark matter. The outermost stars in the Cosmic Seagull, a galaxy 11.3 billion light-years away, race too fast to be propelled by the gravity of the galaxy’s gas and stars alone. Instead, they move as if urged on by an invisible force, indicating the hidden presence of dark matter, astrophysicist Verónica Motta of the University of Valparaíso in Chile and her colleagues report August 8 at arXiv.org.

  • Current Event
    6 months ago
    by aj0690
    +16 +6

    Evidence in the bones reveals rickets in Roman times

    Rickets is mostly seen as a 19th-century disease, but research has revealed that the Romans also had a big problem with getting enough vitamin D. Researchers from Historic England and McMaster University in Canada examined 2,787 skeletons from 18 cemeteries across the Roman empire and discovered that rickets was a widespread phenomenon 2,000 years ago.

  • Current Event
    6 months ago
    by TNY
    +39 +5

    Ice Confirmed at the Moon's Poles

    In the darkest and coldest parts of its polar regions, a team of scientists has directly observed definitive evidence of water ice on the Moon's surface. These ice deposits are patchily distributed and could possibly be ancient. At the southern pole, most of the ice is concentrated at lunar craters, while the northern pole's ice is more widely, but sparsely spread.

  • Current Event
    6 months ago
    by junglman
    +11 +3

    700,000-Year-Old Stone Tools Point to Mysterious Human Relative

    Stone tools found in the Philippines predate the arrival of modern humans to the islands by roughly 600,000 years—but researchers aren’t sure who made them. The eye-popping artifacts, unveiled on Wednesday in Nature, were abandoned on a river floodplain on the island of Luzon beside the butchered carcass of a rhinoceros. The ancient toolmakers were clearly angling for a meal. Two of the rhino's limb bones are smashed in, as if someone was trying to harvest and eat the marrow inside. Cut marks left behind by stone blades crisscross the rhino's ribs and ankle, a clear sign that someone used tools to strip the carcass of meat.

  • Current Event
    6 months ago
    by hxxp
    +30 +8

    DNA shows cave girl was half Neanderthal

    Once upon a time, two early humans of different ancestry met at a cave in Russia. Some 50,000 years later, scientists have confirmed that they had a daughter together. DNA extracted from bone fragments found in the cave show the girl was the offspring of a Neanderthal mother and a Denisovan father.