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  • Current Event
    18 hours ago
    by hiihii
    +15 +5

    Scientists Have Designed a Crystalline Type of Aluminium That's Insanely Light

    Aluminium is already highly prized. It's conductive, has a low melting point, is very strong when alloyed, is impervious to rust and, above all, it's extremely light. But what if you could get it lighter - so light, in fact, that it could float on water even when not made into the shape of a foil boat? According to a model created by researchers at Utah State University and Southern Federal University in Rostov-on Don, Russia, such a thing is actually possible. A team used computational design to conceive a form of crystalline aluminium with extremely low density.

  • Current Event
    11 days ago
    by Chubros
    +24 +8

    Archaeologists find 4,000-year-old obelisk near Cairo

    Egypt says archaeologists have discovered the upper part of royal obelisk dating back more than 4,000 years. The Antiquities Ministry said Wednesday the unearthed part of the obelisk is made of pink granite and is about 2.5 meters (yards) high. The entire obelisk is believed to have been at least twice as high.

  • Analysis
    2 weeks ago
    by dianep
    +25 +6

    Genes that separate humans from fruit flies found

    Genes which determine animal complexity – or what makes humans so much more complex than a fruit fly or a sea urchin – have been identified for the first time. The secret mechanism for how a cell in one animal can be significantly more complex than a similar cell in another animal appears to be due to proteins and their ability to control events in a cell’s nucleus.

  • Current Event
    2 weeks ago
    by 8mm
    +20 +6

    Ancient boy’s DNA pushes back date of earliest humans

    A boy who lived in what’s now South Africa nearly 2,000 years ago has lent a helping genome to science. Using the long-gone youngster’s genetic instruction book, scientists have estimated that humans emerged as a distinct population earlier than typically thought, between 350,000 and 260,000 years ago.

  • Current Event
    2 weeks ago
    by cone
    +23 +6

    Is this the lost city of Alexander the Great?

    Alexander the Great's 'lost city' was a magical place where people drank wine and naked philosophers imparted wisdom, ancient accounts claim. Now, nearly 2,000 years after the great warrior's death, archaeologists believe the city may have finally been discovered in Iraq. Experts first noticed ancient remains in the Iraqi settlement, known as Qalatga Darband, after looking at declassified American spy footage from the 1960s.

  • Current Event
    2 weeks ago
    by cone
    +22 +4

    Archaeologists Find Lost Ancient Greek Temple Of Goddess Artemis

    It took more than 100 years of searching but archaeologists have finally found a lost temple to the ancient Greek goddess Artemis. The Greek Ministry of Culture reported that a team has found the remains of the sanctuary near Amarynthos, a coastal town a couple of dozen miles northeast of Athens on the large Greek island of Euboea. Scientists and historians have spent more than a century looking for what is left of the temple, but an ancient text with inaccurate directions threw them off the trail.

  • Current Event
    3 weeks ago
    by hedman
    +27 +5

    Astronomers discover extremely hot, pitch-black exoplanet

    Using the Hubble Space Telescope, astronomers have discovered a most unusual exoplanet that absorbs 94% of the visible light given off by its host star, making it seem as if it is pitch-black in color, according to research published last week in the Astrophysical Journal Letters. This unusual world, officially known as WASP-12b, is a “hot Jupiter” – a giant gas planet which orbits very closely to its sun and which is heated to extreme temperatures – NASA explained in a statement. In this case, its day side reaches temperatures of up to 4,600 degrees Fahrenheit.

  • Analysis
    7 days ago
    by aj0690
    +1 +1

    Half the universe’s missing matter has just been finally found

    The missing links between galaxies have finally been found. This is the first detection of the roughly half of the normal matter in our universe – protons, neutrons and electrons – unaccounted for by previous observations of stars, galaxies and other bright objects in space.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by roxxy
    +31 +6

    Black hole 100,000 times bigger than sun discovered near center of Milky Way

    A new kind of black hole has been found at the centre of the Milky Way – a find that may help explain the evolution of the phenomena. In research conducted by Japanese astronomers using the ALMA Observatory in northern Chile, a black hole 100,000 times the size of our sun was found within a molecular gas cloud. Its relatively small size means that it is the first to be identified as an intermediate-mass black hole (IMBH).

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by socialiguana
    +15 +5

    Viking sword discovery: Hunter finds 1,100-year-old weapon on Norwegian mountain

    The incredibly well-preserved Viking sword was found by a reindeer hunter on a remote mountain in Southern Norway. The Glacier Archaeology Program at Oppland County Council was recently notified about the sword, which was found in late August in the high mountains of the Lesja area. “It is a common type of Viking sword - what makes it special is the context and the preservation: It was found at 1640 m [5381 feet] above sea level,” explained Lars Pilø, an archaeologist at Oppland County Council, in an email to Fox News. “To my knowledge, a Viking sword has never been found at such a high altitude before.”

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by TentativePrince
    +18 +5

    That female Viking warrior might not be female...or a warrior...after all

    The story sprang up all over the internet after the research was published in the American Journal of Physical Anthropology. So were Vikings more progressive than first thought? Let's break it down.

  • Current Event
    3 weeks ago
    by mariogi
    +11 +4

    German WWI submarine discovered off Belgian coast

    Authorities in Flanders called it the "best preserved" find from the era. The bodies of all 23 crew members were found aboard the vessel, in a watery grave on the floor of the North Sea. Belgian authorities announced on Tuesday that they had discovered the remarkably well-preserved wreck of a World War I German submarine, commonly called a U-boat, off the coast of West Flanders.

  • Analysis
    3 weeks ago
    by jedlicka
    +9 +3

    Poliovirus kills off cancer cells, stops tumor regrowth

    Researchers from Duke University in Durham, NC, may have discovered a new way of killing off cancer cells. The team was jointly led by Dr. Matthias Gromeier, a professor in the Department of Neurosurgery, and Prof. Smita Nair, who is an immunologist in the Department of Surgery.

  • Current Event
    3 weeks ago
    by dynamite
    +19 +3

    Ultra-Light Aluminum: USU Chemist Reports Material Design Breakthrough

    If you drop an aluminum spoon in a sink full of water, the spoon will sink to the bottom. That’s because aluminum, in its conventional form, is denser than water says Utah State University chemist Alexander Boldyrev. But if you restructure the common household metal at the molecular level, as Boldyrev and colleagues did using computational modeling, you could produce an ultra-light crystalline form of aluminum that’s lighter than water.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by wetwilly87
    +21 +8

    Lost crew of 18th Century Dutch treasure ship found off coast of Kent 

    The lost crew of an 18th century Dutch merchant ship has been found by marine archaeologists who were racing against time to preserve the wreck before it is destroyed forever by an invasive sea worm. The Rooswijk sank in bad weather off the coast of Ramsgate in Kent in January 1740, on her second voyage, and was first discovered by a diver in 2005. But after preliminary excavations it was covered up.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by manix
    +30 +9

    Billionaire Paul Allen Finds Lost World War II Cruiser USS Indianapolis in Philippine Sea

    Seventy-two years after two torpedoes fired from a Japanese submarine sunk cruiser USS Indianapolis (CA-35), the ship’s wreckage was found resting on the seafloor on Saturday – more than 18,000 feet below the Pacific Ocean’s surface. Paul Allen, Microsoft co-founder and billionaire philanthropist, led a search team, assisted by historians from the Naval History and Heritage Command (NHHC) in Washington, D.C., to accomplish what past searches had failed to do – find Indianapolis...

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by gottlieb
    +41 +10

    3,700-year-old Babylonian tablet rewrites the history of maths - and shows the Greeks did not develop trigonometry

    A 3,700-year-old clay tablet has proven that the Babylonians developed trigonometry 1,500 years before the Greeks and were using a sophisticated method of mathematics which could change how we calculate today. The tablet, known as Plimpton 332, was discovered in the early 1900s in Southern Iraq by the American archaeologist and diplomat Edgar Banks, who was the inspiration for Indiana Jones.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by bkool
    +22 +7

    Melting glacier reveals bodies of dead hikers on Mont Blanc

    Italian mountain rescue crews said they have recovered the remains of two or three hikers on a glacier on Mont Blanc's southern face likely dating from the 1980s or 1990s. Alpine rescue commander Delfino Viglione said Friday the bodies were discovered this week by a hiker who was searching the area for artifacts from decades-old plane crashes, including one in the 1960s that killed more than 100 people.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by TNY
    +32 +5

    Fossil footprints challenge established theories of human evolution

    Newly discovered human-like footprints from Crete may put the established narrative of early human evolution to the test. The footprints are approximately 5.7 million years old and were made at a time when previous research puts our ancestors in Africa – with ape-like feet.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by geoleo
    +20 +5

    Major Roman ruins discovered underwater in Tunisia

    Roman ruins stretching over 20 hectares have been discovered off the coast of northeastern Tunisia, confirming "with certainty" a theory that the city of Neapolis was partly submerged by a tsunami in the 4th century AD. "It's a major discovery," Mounir Fantar, the head of a Tunisian-Italian archaeological mission which made the find off the coast of Nabeul, told AFP news agency on Thursday.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by tukka
    +21 +4

    First genetic proof that women were Viking warriors

    New DNA evidence uncovered by researchers at Uppsala University and Stockholm University shows that there were in fact female Viking warriors. The remains of an iconic Swedish Viking Age grave now reveal that war was not an activity exclusive to males – women could be found in the higher ranks at the battlefield.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by grandsalami
    +17 +4

    Scientists find fungus with an appetite for plastic in rubbish dump

    We are producing ever greater amounts of plastic – much of which ends up as garbage. What’s more, because plastic does not break down in the same way as other organic materials, it can persist in the environment over hundreds of years. Scientists from the World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF) and the Kunming Institute of Botany in China have recently identified a fungus which could help deal with our waste problem by using enzymes to rapidly break down plastic materials.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by geoleo
    +15 +3

    Three Possible Super-Earths Discovered Around Nearby Sun-Like Star

    Since it was launched in 2009, NASA’s Kepler mission has continued to make important exoplanet discoveries. Even after the failure of two reaction wheels, the space observatory has found new life in the form of its K2 mission. All told, this space observatory has detected 5,017 candidates and confirmed the existence of 2,494 exoplanets using the Transit Method during its past eight years in service.

  • Current Event
    3 weeks ago
    by drunkenninja
    +21 +3

    Plastic-degrading fungus found in Pakistan trash dump

    Scientists found the fungus Aspergillus tubingensis breaking down plastic in a rubbish dump in Islamabad, Pakistan.

  • Current Event
    11 days ago
    by geoleo
    +1 +1

    We just found nineteen new species of gecko in one tiny area

    The number of known species of geckos has just jumped upwards, with 15 new species being formally described this week. “And if you count the four I’m looking at right now it’s 19,” says Lee Grismer of La Sierra University in California. “When you called I was in the process of describing them.” This is a big increase, as there are only around 1500 known species of these lizards, famed for the sticking power of their feet.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by jedlicka
    +21 +8

    Newly Discovered Garbage Patch in the South Pacific Is 1.5 Times the Size of Texas, Study Says

    A largely unstudied area of the South Pacific Ocean is home to a newly discovered garbage patch that researchers estimate to be 1.5 times the size of Texas, according to a recent study. This new patch found in the ocean's gyre is estimated to be as large as 965,000 square miles, reports ResearchGate. Gyres are areas of the ocean that are surrounded by circulating currents. They help circulate ocean waters around the world, but they also suck in pollution.

  • Analysis
    2 months ago
    by canuck
    +28 +8

    Methane-eating bacteria have been discovered deep beneath the Antarctic ice sheet—and that’s pretty good news

    Bacteria that eat methane, a greenhouse gas, have been discovered in an Antarctic lake that has been isolated from the atmosphere for thousands of years. Their presence could significantly reduce the potential risk of warming posed by reservoirs of gas locked up in the ice, scientists say.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by Pfennig88
    +17 +5

    400 million year old fish fossil reveals jaw structure linked to humans

    A new study from ANU on a 400 million year old fish fossil has found a jaw structure that is part of the evolutionary lineage linked to humans. The fossil comes from ancient limestones around Lake Burrinjuck, 50 kilometres northwest of Canberra. The area is rich in fossil shells and corals, but also home to the rare skulls of extinct armoured fish called placoderms.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by hxxp
    +18 +5

    Physicists Detect Radio Waves With Light

    he detection of weak radio signals is a ubiquitous problem in the modern world. Everything from NMR imaging and radio astronomy to navigation and communication depends on picking up faint radio signals that would have been undetectable just a few decades ago. That’s why many groups are racing to find better ways to spot these signals and to process them using state-of-the-art techniques.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by baron778
    +19 +4

    Lost WW2 warship USS Indianapolis found after 72 years

    The World War Two heavy cruiser USS Indianapolis has been found in the Pacific Ocean, 72 years after its sinking by a Japanese submarine. The warship was discovered 18,000 feet (5.5km) beneath the surface. The Indianapolis was destroyed returning from its secret mission to deliver parts for the atomic bomb which was later used on Hiroshima.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by 8mm
    +16 +4

    New Purple Pig-Nose Frog Found in Remote Mountains

    Scientists have discovered a new and unusual species of frog in the Western Ghats mountain range in India. The frog has shiny, purple skin, a light blue ring around its eyes, and a pointy pig-nose. The scientists have called the new species Bhupathy's purple frog (Nasikabatrachus bhupathi), in honor of their colleague, Dr. Subramaniam Bhupathy, a respected herpetologist who lost his life in the Western Ghats in 2014.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by canuck
    +15 +5

    'Sea dragon' fossil is 'largest on record'

    The fossil of a marine reptile ''re-discovered'' in a museum is the largest of its kind on record, say scientists. The ''sea dragon'' belongs to a group that swam the world's oceans 200 million years ago, while dinosaurs walked the land. The specimen is the largest Ichthyosaurus to be described, at more than three metres long.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by sauce
    +13 +3

    Hubble has discovered signs that Nasa's newly discovered planets could support life

    Three potentially habitable Earth-sized planets in another solar system are likely to contain substantial amounts of water, say astronomers. The discovery by the Hubble Space Telescope increases the chances of life evolving on planets orbiting Trappist-1, a dwarf star 40 light years from the sun. Each of the worlds orbits in the star's "habitable zone", the narrow corridor where temperatures are mild enough to permit bodies of surface water such as lakes and oceans.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by rexall
    +11 +5

    Mystery radio signals have been detected from a red dwarf star just 11 light years away

    Scientists have discovered mystery signals coming from a star 11 light-years away. The “very peculiar” pulses appear to be unique to the red dwarf, scientists say, with observations of similar nearby stars showing no similar behavior. Researchers at the Arecibo Observatory, in Puerto Rico, were observing a group of red dwarf stars in a bid to identify planets and other objects orbiting them. In April and May, the team recorded information coming from Gliese 436, Ross 128, Wolf 359, HD 95735, BD +202465, V* RY Sex and K2-18.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by grandtheftsoul
    +32 +5

    Cows produce powerful HIV antibodies

    An unlikely hero has emerged in the quest to fight HIV: the cow. In a first for any animal, including humans, four cows injected with a type of HIV protein rapidly produced powerful antibodies against the virus, researchers report. Learning how to induce similar antibodies in humans may be key to a successful HIV vaccine.