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  • Current Event
    13 days ago
    by rexall
    +15 +1

    Does consciousness come from the brain’s electromagnetic field?

    Some 2,700 years ago in the ancient city of Sam’al, in what is now modern Turkey, an elderly servant of the king sits in a corner of his house and contemplates the nature of his soul. His name is Katumuwa. He stares at a basalt stele made for him, featuring his own graven portrait together with an inscription in ancient Aramaic. It instructs his family, when he dies, to celebrate ‘a feast at this chamber: a bull for Hadad harpatalli and a ram for Nik-arawas of the hunters and a ram for Shamash, and a ram for Hadad of the vineyards, and a ram for Kubaba, and a ram for my soul that is in this stele.’

  • Current Event
    3 weeks ago
    by wetwilly87
    +15 +1

    Writing on Paper Is Much Better for Your Memory Than Writing on Your Phone

    I don’t even remember the last time I tried to memorize a phone number.

  • Current Event
    3 weeks ago
    by zyery
    +21 +1

    Stupidity Is Part of Human Nature

    “There is more to be said for stupidity than people imagine. Personally I have great admiration for stupidity” – the sentiment behind Oscar Wilde’s bonmot is strangely fashionable these days. For a good reason.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by dianep
    +25 +1

    What Happens in Your Brain When You 'Lose Yourself' in Fiction

    Using characters from "Game of Thrones", researchers investigated what happens in the brain when people immerse themselves in fiction. The study found the more people became immersed in a story, the more they "became" the fictional character while reading. This was reflected in activity changes in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, an area of the brain associated with thinking about one's self.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by rawlings
    +3 +1

    Boys Who Play Video Games Have Lower Depression Risk

    Gaming has soared thanks to people being forced to spend more time indoors. But, this overall increase in screen time has left some parents feeling anxious about their children’s well-being. While in the past, engaging in video games has often been portrayed as promoting violent behaviour or a “waste of time,” it could offer some unique benefits for young people as well.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by socialiguana
    +23 +1

    Traumatic stress in childhood can lead to brain changes in adulthood: study

    A groundbreaking new study has shown that traumatic or stressful events in childhood may lead to tiny changes in key brain structures that can now be identified decades later.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by TheSpirit
    +4 +1

    A New Path for Dealing with Fear

    Society has attached a negative connotation to the emotion of fear – and for valid reasons. The last time you felt fear may have been in preparation for a job interview, or reviewing for an entrance exam, or dealing with the concerns associated with the pandemic. Indeed, most people would characterize these as instances related to some form of fear.

  • Current Event
    4 months ago
    by lexi6
    +3 +1

    Mindfulness meditation may decrease impact of migraine

    Migraine is a neurological disease that can be severely debilitating and is the second leading cause of disability worldwide. Unfortunately, many patients with migraine discontinue medications due to ineffectiveness or side effects. Many patients still use opioids despite recommendations against them for headache treatment.

  • Current Event
    5 months ago
    by junglman
    +12 +1

    Study finds night owls more likely to be psychopaths

    People who stay up late at night are more likely to display anti-social personality traits such as narcissism, Machiavellianism, and psychopathic tendencies, according to a study published by a University of Western Sydney researcher. Dr Peter Jonason, from the UWS School of Social Sciences and Psychology, assessed over 250 people's tendency to be a morning- or evening-type person to discover whether this was linked to the 'Dark Triad' of personality traits.

  • Current Event
    7 months ago
    by Petrox
    +15 +1

    Unhappy? Sleep it off, says new UBC study

    Happiness might seem in short supply these days as the COVID-19 pandemic stretches on: “fewer faces in bigger spaces,” smaller bubbles, less socializing and last call at 10 p.m. However, that early cutoff time at the bar just might do everyone some good. A new study on sleep deprivation by University of B.C. researcher and health psychologist Nancy Sin shows that if you don’t get enough sleep, not only are the lows lower, the highs are also lower as well.

  • Current Event
    7 months ago
    by zobo
    +15 +1

    Our Ability To Perceive Musical Beat Becomes More Refined Through Childhood

    If you were to play your favourite song right now, I imagine you’d have little difficulty clapping along with the beat. Our appreciation of beat allows us to clap, dance, march and sway in time with a piece of music — or just with each other. As the authors of a new paper published in the Journal of Experimental Psychology: General point out, these behaviours occur spontaneously across human cultures. But while moving to a beat seems effortless, it involves all kinds of perceptual processes.

  • Current Event
    7 months ago
    by funhonestdude
    +28 +1

    The key to happiness: Friends or family? The answer might surprise you

    Think spending time with your kids and spouse is the key to your happiness? You may actually be happier getting together with your friends, said SMU psychology professor Nathan Hudson. Hudson's research finds that people report higher levels of well-being while hanging with their friends than they do with their romantic partner or children. In fact, being around romantic partners predicted the least amount of happiness among these three groups, reveals a study published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology.

  • Analysis
    7 months ago
    by wildcard
    +12 +1

    The Dark Core of Personality

    Over 100 years ago Charles Spearman made two monumental discoveries about human intelligence. First, a general factor of intelligence (g) exists: people who score high on one test of intelligence also tend to score high on other tests of intelligence. Second, Spearman found that the g-factor conforms to the principle of the "indifference of the indicator": It doesn't matter what test of intelligence you administer; as long as the intelligence test is sufficiently cognitively complex and has enough items, you can reliably and validly measure a person's general cognitive ability.

  • Expression
    8 months ago
    by larylin
    +4 +1

    Why is Rational Decision Making Difficult?

    A blog about mental health and well-being.

  • Current Event
    8 months ago
    by belangermira
    +13 +1

    Why we eat meat without guilt, but hate seeing animal slaughter

    When I ate meat, if someone were to have asked me if I loved animals, I would have said an enthusiastic ‘yes!’ After all, I adored playing with dogs and cats I would come across, enjoyed feeding squirrels and birds with my grandmother and liked watching wildlife documentaries with my father.

  • Analysis
    9 months ago
    by kxh
    +17 +1

    Brain Scans Show Why Our Mind's Eye Sees The World So Differently to Everyday Vision

    Researchers have discovered a neural overlap between human and machine that helps to explain why what we see in our mind's eye is different to the information being processed by our actual eyes when we're peering at something in reality.

  • Current Event
    9 months ago
    by TheSpirit
    +3 +1

    What makes people stop caring?

    “If I look at the mass I will never act. If I look at the one, I will." These are the words of a woman whose acts of charity and kindness earned her sainthood – Mother Theresa. They exemplify one of the most baffling aspects of the human response to the plight of others. While most of us will see a single death as a tragedy, we can struggle to have the same response to large-scale loss of life. Too often, the deaths of many simply become a statistic.

  • Analysis
    10 months ago
    by grandtheftsoul
    +21 +1

    COVID-19 lockdowns helped people get more, but not necessarily better, sleep

    Lockdowns haven’t just curbed coronavirus transmission — they’ve also helped people get more sleep. Two studies, both published June 10 in Current Biology, report that people began sleeping more and more regularly every night after countries imposed stay-at-home orders to slow the spread of the coronavirus. But that sleep may not have been of the best quality, one of those studies finds.

  • Current Event
    10 months ago
    by wetwilly87
    +3 +1

    Why ‘stillness’ is crucial for your brain during this pandemic

    A lot of messages are being thrown at us during this pandemic. One of them is this idea that we should all be optimizing our time in quarantine, that we should seize the opportunity to be productive. Social media posts taunt us: “Write that business plan you’ve been meaning to.” “Did you know Shakespeare wrote King Lear during quarantine?” “If you don’t come out of quarantine with a new skill, you didn’t ever lack time… you lacked discipline.”

  • Current Event
    10 months ago
    by jedlicka
    +14 +1

    The Dark Core of Personality

    Over 100 years ago Charles Spearman made two monumental discoveries about human intelligence. First, a general factor of intelligence (g) exists: people who score high on one test of intelligence also tend to score high on other tests of intelligence. Second, Spearman found that the g-factor conforms to the principle of the "indifference of the indicator": It doesn't matter what test of intelligence you administer; as long as the intelligence test is sufficiently cognitively complex and has enough items, you can reliably and validly measure a person's general cognitive ability.