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  • Current Event
    3 days ago
    by TheSpirit
    +16 +1

    People who are religious and 'ontologically confused' are more likely to share pseudo-profound bullshit

    A new study has found that the more literally a person understands metaphorical statements and the more religious they are, the more likely they are to share pseudo-profound bullshit on social media. The new research, published in Applied Cognitive Psychology, replicated Gordon Pennycook’s 2015 study on bullshit receptivity — meaning the propensity to interpret nonsensical sentences as profound statements — using a sample from two Eastern European countries.

  • Current Event
    3 weeks ago
    by TNY
    +22 +1

    Mind’s quality control center found in long-ignored brain area

    The cerebellum can’t get no respect. Located inconveniently on the underside of the brain and initially thought to be limited to controlling movement, the cerebellum has long been treated like an afterthought by researchers studying higher brain functions. But researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis say overlooking the cerebellum is a mistake. Their findings, published Oct. 25 in Neuron, suggest that the cerebellum has a hand in every aspect of higher brain functions — not just movement, but attention, thinking, planning and decision-making.

  • Expression
    2 months ago
    by junglman
    +14 +1

    If You’re Bad, Here's How to Get People to Think You’re Good

    Consider the protagonist Walter White from the series Breaking Bad. Throughout the series, he manufactures methamphetamine, repeatedly puts his family in danger, and commits multiple murders. And yet viewers liked him. In fact, some even defended him. How is this possible?

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by spacepopper
    +16 +1

    Sex on the Brain: Frequent Sex Might Have Cognitive Benefits

    Frequent sex might enhance our performance on certain cognitive tasks. A growing body of research on both humans and animals published in the last decade points to this conclusion, including a new study in the Archives of Sexual Behavior. Here's a look at the accumulated evidence and what it suggests about how sex might benefit the brain.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by zobo
    +7 +1

    Why The Mind Is Not the Brain

    Let’s start with the title of your latest book. Why is the mind not the brain? The shortest argument goes something like this: there’s what philosophers call a mereological fallacy. Mereology is the discipline which studies the relation between wholes and parts. So imagine someone tells you that David Beckham didn’t score a goal, it was his foot. That would be an odd thing to say because Beckham couldn’t shoot for the goal without his foot, but it was the whole beast, so to speak, which shot the goal.

  • Expression
    4 years ago
    by drunkenninja
    +24 +1

    Allie Brosh describes depression with illustrations (Hyperbole and a Half)

    Some people have a legitimate reason to feel depressed, but not me. I just woke up one day feeling sad and helpless for absolutely no reason.

  • Expression
    3 years ago
    by rhingo
    +20 +1

    Why It’s Good To Be Wrong

    Nothing obstructs access to the truth like a belief in absolute truthfulness.

  • Expression
    3 years ago
    by drunkenninja
    +15 +1

    Hacking the Tripping Mind: A Fantastic Voyage Through Inner Space

    Pay attention. What if you could focus and control your consciousness when under the influence of psychedelics? Cognitive roller-coasters may be upon us. Almost fifty years ago, ex-Harvard professor Timothy Leary and his colleagues penned an essay titled "On Programming Psychedelic Experiences." Essentially, the article served as a field manual for navigating awareness during altered states of consciousness, a kind of map to help orient and manage subjectivity, a voyage chart to focus...

  • Analysis
    3 years ago
    by messi
    +18 +1

    Are humans getting cleverer?

    IQ is rising in many parts of the world. What's behind the change and does it really mean people are cleverer than their grandparents? It is not unusual for parents to comment that their children are brainier than they are. In doing so, they hide a boastful remark about their offspring behind a self-deprecating one about themselves. But a new study, published in the journal Intelligence, provides fresh evidence that in many cases this may actually be true.

  • Analysis
    3 years ago
    by geoleo
    +2 +1

    Chronic Fatigue Syndrome a real measurable illness, researchers claim

    Researchers say they have found 'unequivocal' evidence that chronic fatigue syndrome is not an imaginary illness, but a genuine condition that causes the immune system to go into overdrive, leaving patients feeling perpetually exhausted.

  • Current Event
    3 years ago
    by jedlicka
    +17 +1

    Reasons To Get High, Or Why Pole Vaulters Risk Everything For An Extra Half-Inch

    The Pole Vault is a singular and uniquely dangerous sport. The people who do it anyway aren't in it for money. They're in it to fly, and because they're a little crazy. Renaud Lavillenie stares down the runway and up at the bar. His eyes seem to bulge, his eyebrows bounce, his head jerks to the left. He could be cracking his neck; it's more likely the Frenchman is thinking, Putain de merde qui est élevé, or, in English, "Holy shit, that's high."

  • Current Event
    3 years ago
    by mtnrg
    +2 +1

    Einstein's election riddle: are you in the two per cent that can solve it?

    Nicola lives in the tartan house, but who owns the fish?

  • Interactive
    3 years ago
    by Tzvetelin
    +3 +1

    How neurotic are you? one-minute personality test (2/5)

    Discover the second of second five components of your personality with this one-minute test.

  • Analysis
    3 years ago
    by ticktack
    +21 +1

    Does our terror of dying drive almost everything we do?

    In October 1984, a young Skidmore College professor, Sheldon Solomon, traveled to a Utah ski lodge to introduce what would become a major theory of social psychology. The setting was a conference of the Society of Experimental Social Psychology, a prestigious professional organization. Solomon’s theory explained that people embrace cultural worldviews and strive for self-esteem largely to cope with the fear of death. The reception he got was as frosty as the snow piled up outside.

  • Expression
    3 years ago
    by grandtheftsoul
    +15 +1

    Why Men Kill Themselves

    Finally, Drummond had everything he’d ever dreamed of. He’d come a long way since he was a little boy, upset at his failure to get into the grammar school. That had been a great disappointment to his mother, and to his father, who was an engineer at a pharmaceutical company. His dad had never showed much interest in him as a child. He didn’t play with him and when he was naughty, he’d put him over the back of a chair and wallop him.

  • Expression
    3 years ago
    by darvinhg
    +10 +1

    Your Brain Can’t Handle the Moon

    What is this new theory?” the long-retired New York University cognitive psychologist, Lloyd Kaufman, asked me. We were sitting behind the wooden desk of his cozy home office. He had a stack of all his papers on the moon illusion, freshly printed, waiting for me on the adjacent futon. But I couldn’t think of a better way to start our discussion than to have him respond to the latest thesis claiming to explain what has gone, for thousands of years, unexplained...

  • Expression
    3 years ago
    by TNY
    +13 +1

    I once tried to cheat sleep, and for a year I succeeded

    In the summer of 2009, I was finishing the first—and toughest—year of my doctorate. To help me get through it, while I brewed chemicals in test tubes during the day, I was also planning a crazy experiment to cheat sleep. As any good scientist would, I referred to past studies, recorded data, and discussed notes with some of my colleagues. Although the sample size was just one—and, obviously, biased—I was going to end up learning...

    discuss by TNY via qz.com
  • Current Event
    3 years ago
    by mtnrg
    +1 +1

    Upcoming Symposium Looks at Anime from Psychological Point of View

    Director Sunao Katabuchi involved

  • Analysis
    3 years ago
    by drunkenninja
    +21 +1

    The best music to listen to for optimal productivity, according to science

    Oftentimes we have innumerable distractions at work competing for our attention. Luckily, music can help put us back on a more productive track. Studies out of the University of Birmingham, England, show that music is effective in raising efficiency in repetitive work - so if you’re mindlessly checking email or filling out a spreadsheet, adding some tunes will make your task go by that much faster.

  • Expression
    3 years ago
    by zyery
    +2 +1

    Why Lonely People Stay Lonely

    Nobody likes feeling lonely, and some recent research suggests that the ache of isolation isn’t only a psychological problem; unwanted solitude impacts physical health, too. Loneliness increases a person’s risk of mortality by 26 percent, an effect comparable to the health risks posed by obesity, according to a study published this spring.

  • Analysis
    3 years ago
    by wildcat
    +7 +1

    This Graphic Explains 20 Cognitive Biases That Affect Your Decision-Making

    We all make bad decisions sometimes, but have you ever wondered what mental obstacles can lead you astray? This infographic goes over 20 of the most common cognitive biases that can mess with your head when it’s decision time. Some of the cognitive biases on this graphic from Samantha Lee and Shana Lebowitz at Business Insider may sound pretty familiar. You’ve probably heard of the “placebo effect” and “confirmation bias” altering...

  • Analysis
    3 years ago
    by tranxene
    +18 +1

    20 cognitive biases that screw up your decisions

    Your decisions may not be as rational as you think.

  • Expression
    3 years ago
    by drunkenninja
    +45 +1

    The internet is eating your memory, but something better is taking its place

    In the years since the world started going digital, one of the big changes has been that we don’t need to remember very much. Why risk forgetting a partner’s birthday or a dinner date with a close friend when you can commit the details to your computer, laptop, smartphone or tablet and get a reminder at the appropriate time?

  • Current Event
    3 years ago
    by everlost
    +24 +1

    Yale stabbing, suicide were the result of a threesome gone terribly wrong

    The apartment was only a few blocks from the hallowed halls of Yale University, but the horrors inside were unrecognizable from any Ivy League ideal. As police pushed aside the apartment’s already open door, they found a crime scene the likes of which had never been seen in the upper tier college town of New Haven, Conn.

  • Expression
    3 years ago
    by kdawson
    Expression
    +1 +1

    The Pure Mind Doctrine

  • Analysis
    3 years ago
    by cone
    +50 +1

    Mass Murderers Fit Profile, as Do Many Others Who Don’t Kill

    They have become one of the most notorious and alarming stripes of evil. People who, when you think back, seemed off. Didn’t dress right. Kept to themselves. Were nursing a bitterness that smoldered inside of them. And then they picked up guns and went out and killed as many as they could. In the aftermath, the same questions arise: Why didn’t everyone know? Why weren’t they stopped?

  • Analysis
    3 years ago
    by messi
    +51 +1

    Can You Get Smarter?

    You can increase the size of your muscles by pumping iron and improve your stamina with aerobic training. Can you get smarter by exercising — or altering — your brain? This is hardly an idle question considering that cognitive decline is a nearly universal feature of aging. Starting at age 55, our hippocampus, a brain region critical to memory, shrinks 1 to 2 percent every year, to say nothing of the fact that one in nine people age 65 and older has Alzheimer’s disease.

  • Analysis
    2 years ago
    by dianep
    +36 +1

    The Psychology of Terrorism

    Here in the UK, one of the reasons why the appalling killings of two US journalists by Islamic terrorists have caused shock and soul-searching is because the apparent killer of both journalists (‘Jihadi John’, as he has been called) seems to be a young British man. In the videos he speaks with a clear London accent. The brutality of these killings seems completely out of place in the modern world; it seems to belong to a primitive pre-civilised era where...

  • Analysis
    2 years ago
    by drunkenninja
    +18 +1

    How Humans Ended Up With Freakishly Huge Brains

    Scientists have begun to identify the symphony of biological triggers that powered the extraordinary expansion of the human brain. There it was, sitting on the mantelpiece, staring at her with hollow eyes and a naked grin. She could not stop staring back. It looked distinctly like the fossilized skull of an extinct baboon. That was the sort of thing Josephine Salmons was likely to know. At the time—1924—she was one of the only female students of anatomy attending the University of...

  • Analysis
    2 years ago
    by geoleo
    +30 +1

    Do Bilingual People Have a Cognitive Advantage?

    For years, psychologists have been debating the “bilingual advantage” – the idea that speaking more than one language fluently brings with it cognitive benefits. Believers and skeptics in the theory have been trading blows for a while, but matters recently came to a head in the form of a series of papers in the journal Cortex. The bilingual advantage hypothesis states that bilinguals excel at ‘cognitive control’ also known as ‘executive function’ – meaning that...

  • Analysis
    2 years ago
    by canuck
    +26 +1

    Forgetting is key to learning

    Do you often feel overwhelmed with the amount of information coming at you? Forgotten your shopping list as soon as you've heard the sports results? Don't worry, it's all completely normal – and necessary – according to new research which shows that such forgetting is a key part of learning. The study, by researchers from the University of Glasgow's Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology, is published today in Current Biology and has found that...

  • Expression
    2 years ago
    by TNY
    +41 +1

    PTSD in the Slaughterhouse

    Slaughterhouse workers face physical dangers and psychological problems based on their work, according to studies. There are approximately 1,100 federally inspected slaughterhouses in the United States, about 70 of which are in Texas. Most are in hinterlands such as Mineola, Muenster and Windthorst. The majority of these facilities slaughter and process animals, collectively employing thousands of workers who turn a constant...

  • Expression
    2 years ago
    by doodlegirl
    +5 +1

    When Do You Become an Adult?

    It would probably be fair to call Henry “aimless.” After he graduated from Harvard, he moved back in with his parents, a boomerang kid straight out of a trend piece about the travails of young adults. Despite graduating into a recession, Henry managed to land a teaching job, but two weeks in, he decided it wasn’t for him and quit. It took him a while to find his calling—he worked in his father’s pencil factory, as a door-to-door magazine salesman...

  • Expression
    2 years ago
    by geoleo
    +47 +1

    The First 'Nigerian Prince' Scam

    In 1966, Stanford University psychologists Jonathan Freeman and Scott Fraser observed an interesting phenomenon in their experiments: someone who has already agreed to a small request—like opening the door for you—would become more, not less, likely to agree to a larger request later on. In one study, they asked 150 housewives in Palo Alto, California, if they would sacrifice two hours of their time: a research team of five or six people would come...

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by takai
    +35 +1

    Can a brain scan uncover your morals?

    It’s hard to imagine Steven Northington killing two people. The 43-year-old says he likes to make people laugh, “like a comedian”. He’s a loyal son to his troubled mother and father. He sends his younger sister birthday cards from prison and draws elaborate smiley faces on them. His defense team laughs with affection when they hear his name because he is, they say, “a character”. Between 2003 and 2004, Northington was slinging for a drug ring that flooded his...