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StarFlower's feed

  • 2 days ago
    Comment StarFlower

    Interesting headline, but the article was relatively poorly written. For example, no mention was made of job sectors which are particularly at-risk for technology replacement in 10 years, nor, conversely, job sectors that you would expect to be low-risk for technology replacement e.g. plumbers, senior health care aides, etc. Instead there was more fluff than substance in the article.

  • 2 days ago
    Comment StarFlower

    I can see what Apple is trying to do, but I doubt that the robo-callers or scammers are conducting their scams from their iPhones.

    What I think would be more helpful would be a button on the RECEIVER'S end of things called "report this number" where people can report scammers and spam callers to Apple. Apple could then use that info to flag incoming calls from those types of numbers as "Suspected spam. Take call anyway?" This way it would not matter whether the caller was using iPhone or a robo-call machine, it would help Apple users who are getting incoming calls from those numbers.

  • 2 days ago
    Comment StarFlower

    Yes, I already have my phone number already on the don't-call list! It doesn't help! The US don't-call list is not very effective. It sounds like the one in Belgium is much, much better. Scammers don't go by the law, and I feel like there is too little done here to stop them. I definitely wish there was more that could be done to report them. I've considered typing up a list of numbers that are scams or robo-calls and putting it up online to make a database. But then I heard that some of the scammers make it look like their phone number is something that it isn't really, and I would hate for an innocent number to go up on my database. So in the end, if I get repeated calls from a number that doesn't leave a message, I eventually block that number from my phone.

  • 2 days ago
    Current Event StarFlower

    Hackers Steal $59 Million In Cryptocurrency From Japanese Exchange

    Hackers stole an estimated $59 million from a Japanese cryptocurrency exchange called Zaif, according to a statement released by the owners of the exchange.

  • 2 days ago
    Comment StarFlower

    While reading this article, I was wondering why the author does not quit social media if they find it that terrible. The author provided an answer to this during the article, saying that social media was just too addictive.

    This is a bit like someone who desperately wants to lose weight saying they're not going to do it because unhealthy foods are too addictive.

  • 2 days ago
    Comment StarFlower

    Because it's not satisfied with what it already knows about you?

  • 4 days ago
    Comment StarFlower

    I'd have to say that probably MORE than half of the calls I get appear to be scams. I basically don't answer the phone unless it's someone I know. Otherwise, they can leave a message.

  • 4 days ago
    How-to StarFlower

    Free Simple Knitting Patterns

    Here are free simple knitting patterns. These projects are quick and easy so you can produce a finished item fast. Enjoy!

  • 4 days ago
    Comment StarFlower

    I would have to say that this is one of the rare problems where fixing it results in making things easier for employers and everyone, than NOT fixing it. In other words, the fix results in everyone NOT having to have extra hassle. So if a problem can be fixed in such a way that it causes LESS work than continuing on with the status quo, why not fix it?!

  • 4 days ago
    Comment StarFlower

    I'm hoping this action by the EU will prompt other countries such as the US to follow suit.

    I'm all for either sticking to non-DST year-round, or sticking to DST time year round, but basically sticking to one time. Hopefully when the EU does it, other countries will see it's not too complicated and will do it. The thing that really bugs me is that most of the year, it doesn't matter anyway - in summer, the morning and evening commutes are both happening in daylight; in winter they're both happening in the dark. In other words, the days are long enough in summer and short enough in winter not to make any real difference to whether we have daylight savings or not, anyway.

  • 3 weeks ago
    Comment StarFlower

    This article was so-so. They point out that going to bed late allows people to be productive late at night; at hours when they're less likely to get interruptions. This is very true. However, they also fail to acknowledge that early risers can also accomplish things early in the morning before standard work hours, without interruptions.

    I did like the point they made that in early societies, having people with a range of circadian rhythms in a community was helpful, since there was always someone awake at any given point, to watch for predators etc. Overall though, I felt the article was more "fluff" than substance. It was interesting but could have made the exact same points while being condensed a lot more.

  • 3 weeks ago
    Comment StarFlower

    That is scary. It seems so wrong when someone has paid all their insurance premiums, that they are not protected from this sort of thing. He had a heart attack and therefore was taken by ambulance to the nearest hospital - he didn't have a choice about which one. In these situations where the patient has no choice and has a life-threatening emergency, it shouldn't matter if it's in-network and out-of-network.

    Plus, most health plans have an out-of-network maximum that even for out-of-network situations there is a capped limit that the patient has to pay (usually far, far less than 109K!!) So I am shocked that this sort of thing happened to this man, who is grappling with this situation on top of recovering from a heart attack where he nearly died.

    I am glad reporters followed this situation. It makes you wonder how many less-reported or less-publicized cases there are.

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  • 1 month ago
    Comment StarFlower

    Exactly!! Put it up and allow ppl to point out flaw/loopholes (initially for free/bragging rights), then offer significant bug bounties, then make changes based on that. Still much cheaper than whatever they go through when the machines are hacked.

  • 1 month ago
    Comment StarFlower

    I agree, it's a big problem - if someone steals your phone, they have access to your authentication for your various accounts. I minimize what things are linked to my phone number, but even so, many accounts require you to have a phone number that they WILL use to send authentication texts etc. I'd love to see a solution like the one they proposed in the article.

  • 1 month ago
    Comment StarFlower

    Very scary stuff!

  • 1 month ago
    Comment StarFlower

    That is so scary, when a patient is fighting for her life, that she also has to deal with insurance companies who won't agree with the decisions of a trained oncologist. She's been paying insurance premiums exactly for the reason of getting life-saving treatment, after all.

  • 1 month ago
    Comment StarFlower

    This is scary. Hard to believe a city is literally sinking, but it is.

  • 1 month ago
    Achievement StarFlower

    Good Image

    Reached a reputation rating of 80%. Congratulations StarFlower on this achievement!

    +20510 XP
  • 1 month ago
    Comment StarFlower

    I know it's amazing, but it still sounds a little creepy to me. (Will they take over the world one day??)

  • 1 month ago
    Comment StarFlower

    I wish the article had made it clear whether Linux was installed alongside Windows, or as the only OS. That's a pretty important point.

  • 1 month ago
    Comment StarFlower

    Another reason I'm glad I made the switch to Linux.

  • 1 month ago
    Current Event StarFlower

    Operation Bayonet: Inside the Sting That Hijacked an Entire Dark Web Drug Market

    Dutch police detail for the first time how they secretly hijacked Hansa, Europe's most popular dark web market.

  • 1 month ago
    Comment StarFlower

    Although I didn't forsee this, I'm not a fan at all of 23andMe, and this has just reinforced my (low) opinion of them. I'd never get any testing like that done, and if for some reason I wanted to, it would not be through 23andMe, and it would only be with genetic counseling done first.

  • 1 month ago
    Comment StarFlower

    Oh thanks! The links are great!! Anyone who hasn't seen the episode will otherwise have no clue what I'm talking about... so am grateful for the links. Yes - definitely a spine-chilling concept.

  • 1 month ago
    Comment StarFlower

    As far as I understood it, the European privacy laws relate to where the user is located, not the company or the data centers.