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  • wekjak
    +12

    I'd like you to elaborate on that, if you would. Is democracy a bad thing? If someone is to make this decision, who else but the people of Greece?

    Keep in mind, this is a tough decision, and were pros and cons to voting "yes" and "no." But, to denigrate the people of Greece for making a decision that many economists, including nobel prize winner Joseph Stiglitz, support, seems a bit childish. Would really like you to clarify what you meant by saying that the kids are running the candy store. Seems like a very anti-democratic/pro-authoritarian sentiment.

    • nyx
      +5

      I agree. The people of Greece voted for this government for it to defend their interests, isn't it appropriate that, when in doubt, the government asks the people what they want? If every government had done this when the crisis hit perhaps some countries wouldn't be in this situation in the first place.

      • BuckFuddie
        +2

        I don't think it was an issue of doubt. Tsipras seemed to be looking for another bargaining chip. If the majority says 'no' to proposed changes, then Tsipras is in a better position to say 'no' and hope there will be further discussion.

        • KingAztek
          +3

          The problem is that the rest of Europe has already stated that a 'no' on the referendum wouldn't lead to a stronger hand for Greece at the negotiating table. I believe that Greece will like fall out of the Eurozone

          • wekjak
            +1

            That's not really an unintended consequence for many who voted "no" in the referendum. They argue that that's exactly what Greece needs: exit from the Eurozone and print their own undervalued currency. It means some seriously tough times ahead, but it gives them a chance to grow their economy because their export and tourism industries will be far more competitive.

      • Muffintop (edited 5 years ago)
        +1

        Some decisions should be done by the government as they should have the knowledge and experience to do what's best for the people. And they should be held responsible for the outcomes. The issue with this referendum was that they basically asked the people if they want austerity and cuts, subconsciously suggesting that a NO vote would avoid that. Which is simply not true. It's choosing between two bad scenarios and unfortunately the people in this case are not the best ones to make this decision. However, on the bright side, now it has been decided by the people and they can't blame Tsipras or anyone else if this decision turns out to be for worse.

        • wekjak (edited 5 years ago)
          +2

          The choice was between an almost guaranteed generations-long depression and the chance of recovery within a decade. As I said above, many economists and policy-makers agree with the people of Greece on this one. They made the right decision for themselves.

          If it were up to the Syriza government, they would have made the same decision. The fact that they gave the people the right to choose only solidifies the validity of the decision.

        • nyx
          +1

          I do understand that in a way the current government has discarded its responsibility on the matter by asking the people to decide on such a crucial question, but the truth is that either answer would still mean a lot of trouble, like you said, they were two bad scenarios anyway. However I still believe it was very important to make the referendum, since basically they offered the Greek people a chance of saying 'We know the consequences but we still want to fight' and they kept true to the motives behind their election. So in a way the government said 'Look, we either accept these conditions or we keep discussing, but either way the consequences will be terrible. The only thing we can choose, however, is how we go down. What do you, the Greek nation, prefer?'.

          You can't forget that the austerity that the European countries in crisis are going through is absolutely terrible anyway. There are children who can only have a meal a day. Young people can't find jobs, no matter how many degrees they have. Middle aged people are losing their houses, businesses and jobs. Elderly people have to choose between medication and food. Is this something you would expect from an European nation?

          With this referendum, the Greek people have sent a clear message to their creditors: they will not subject themselves to this poverty on their terms anymore, they might go through an even rougher patch from now on but at least they will be there on their own choice. Now, is this the right path? I have no idea.