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Published 3 years ago with 24 Comments
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  • caelreth
    +6

    A nice article on one of my favorite books (and its author)

  • KaliYugaz
    +5

    Dune is like the most 60's thing that ever was. Ecological consciousness as a central plot point? A commentary on colonialism? Mind altering drugs that warp the fabric of space-time? It's a great ride.

  • NinjaKlaus
    +5

    I think this is the book that started it all for me, after this book I started reading more and more, all six originals in a matter of months, followed by other books like Foundation and then others. Today I mostly read thrillers, murder mysteries and young adult stuff because they are small and fast reads, but Sci-Fi and Dune in particular hold a special place, and still sit on my shelves today.

  • Gozzin
    +4

    I really like sf,but i just could not enjoy Dune.

    • ricardo
      +4

      Any particular reason?

      • WordsWordsWords
        +2

        For me, at least, it felt like a high barrier to entry. Usually I'm really into a dark world-feel. For some reason or another, the opening chapters just haven't grabbed me.

        That said, I've just started dating a girl who's really into Dune, so I'll probably read through it soon as something to discuss with her.

        • Epigram
          +2

          I had the same problem when I first started reading it. I think it took me three months to make it through the first few chapters. If you hold through, it picks up and is totally worth the read. Unfortunately I'm having the same problem with Foundation. I might just need to set aside some time and commit to it.

  • jayrunham
    +4

    Really glad this brought up Jodorowsky's Dune. Such a great documentary. I'm still waiting for a really good (TV or film) adaptation of Dune. Though it is a little weird that it doesn't mention the TV Mini-Series, I remember that being decent.

  • ghost403
    +4

    I don't think I ever finished Dune. I'll have to give it another go after finishing the Foundation trilogy again.

    • jessdabess
      +5

      Foundation is sooo good. I haven't gotten around to the third yet though :( . Go back and read Dune, it's definitely worth it!

      • Goldfinger (edited 3 years ago)
        +2

        I come bearing good news. There are so many more Foundation books. I think Asimov penned 7 himself and others have taken over since. Just read one by Greg Bear (?).

        • ghost403 (edited 3 years ago)
          +2

          I read Prelude to Foundation a while ago. It wasn't nearly as good as the original trilogy, but was still a very solid book. Are the non-Asimov ones worth reading?

          Also, I'm supposed to be reading Dune next, so stop giving me ideas.

  • bogdan (edited 3 years ago)
    +4

    Dune was mind-opening for me. It fulfilled it's role as a book excellently in that regard. I have to say, much like others, it seemed to me at first like it was too much of the standard novel... pshh "chosen child" yeah right... but then when the child turns into something else, and things start getting complicated, everything becomes a beautiful symphony of creativity.

  • smokedhuman
    +3

    Thanks for posting. This was a great read. I read the first book way back in 7th grade and enjoyed it as a standalone. I did not read any of the others until much later in life. I appreciate the ecological and colonialist themes but I was more drawn towards the messianic overtones of the series. It has been a while since I have read them and I think I have an activity for the next rain filled one.

    • AdelleChattre
      +3

      I've got to admit that it took me a few tries before I could get through it. There's no descriptive language. Things like ‘ornithopter’ are mentioned, never described. Friends have made their way through all the books, but not me. Despite how great they are. What worlds can take place entirely within the mind of someone sitting in the dunes in Oregon. The familiar messiah business never had the same appeal for me as the ecology and economy of that empire. One day, if I ever happen to get a hammock on a beach somewhere and the luxury of time, I mean to read more Dune.

      • smokedhuman
        +3

        I grew up in the bible belt and was thus enamored with the religious aspects. Some of the correlations I found with the local zealots and the book was fascinating to me.

  • BasedStannis
    +3

    I keep meaning to read this but with all the funky character names, dynasties, political groups, locations, histories, etc. I always end up putting it down out of frustration. Will give it another try when I get some downtime.

    I had the same problem when I first picked up Game of Thrones but persisted with it and ASOIAF became probably my favourite series.

    • jessdabess
      +3

      Definitely go back to it. If you got over those issues with ASOIAF then you can do it with Dune. Also, remember, Duncan Idaho is Patrick Stewart. That could help.

      • DunktheTall
        +2

        Actually Gurney Halleck is Patrick Steward.

        • jessdabess
          +1

          Omg, my entire perception of the books has changed. Fuck. Now I have an ass load of re-reading to do.

    • CoPilotBob
      +2

      If you can get into it, I've found Dune to be one of those novels that I keep coming back to re-read again and again.

  • ricardo
    +3

    I actually read this recently, and I loved it. Great story, great characters, amazing word building.

  • GoyzIIMensch
    +2

    Just read Dune for the first time a few weeks ago and really enjoyed it.

  • GingerBreadMan
    +2

    Thanks to all of these comments, I will be picking this up this week to read.

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