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  • Current Event
    8 months ago
    by darvinhg
    +22 +1

    Novel Nanotechnology Could Enhance Effectiveness of Chemo

    University of Arizona Health Sciences researchers recently completed a study that has the potential to improve cancer treatment for colorectal cancer and melanoma by using nanotechnology to deliver chemotherapy in a way that makes it more effective against aggressive tumors. The findings were published today in Nature Nanotechnology.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by mariogi
    +27 +1

    Researcher finds a better way to tap into the brain

    Using a new class of nanoparticles that are two thousand times thinner than a human hair, Sakhrat Khizroev, a professor of electrical and computer engineering at the University’s College of Engineering, hopes to unlock the secrets of the brain.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by spacepopper
    +28 +1

    Nanobots Will Be Flowing Through Your Body by 2030

    According to some futurists, in the next 10 or so years, your blood could be streaming with tiny nanorobots to help keep you from getting sick or even transmit your thoughts to a wireless cloud. They will travel inside of you, on a molecular level, protecting your biological system and ensuring that you'll have a good and long life. The future is closer than you may think.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by messi
    +4 +1

    Growing gold nanoparticles inside tumors can help kill cancer

    Gold isn’t just a pretty face – it’s shown promise in fighting cancer in many studies. Now researchers have found a way to grow gold nanoparticles directly inside cancer cells within 30 minutes, which can help with imaging and even be heated up to kill the tumors.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by grandsalami
    +4 +1

    Scientists apply 'twistronics' to light propagation and make a breakthrough discovery

    A research team led by scientists at the Advanced Science Research Center at The Graduate Center, CUNY (CUNY ASRC), in collaboration with National University of Singapore, University of Texas at Austin and Monash University, has employed "twistronics" concepts (the science of layering and twisting two-dimensional materials to control their electrical properties) to manipulate the flow of light in extreme ways. The findings, published in the journal Nature, hold the promise for leapfrog advances in a variety of light-driven technologies, including nano-imaging devices; high-speed, low-energy optical computers; and biosensors.

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by zritic
    +26 +1

    Scientists created a new sponge that could clean up oil spills

    The secret to cleaning up contaminated water may lie in the cheap, common polyurethane foam used in mattresses. In a study published in the journal Nature Sustainability this week, scientists tested the ability of the material, enhanced with a special coating, to soak up tiny droplets of oil suspended in water. They found that it consistently captured almost all of the oil in under three hours.

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by kong88
    +13 +1

    Researchers observe brain-like behavior in nanoscale device

    UCLA scientists James Gimzewski and Adam Stieg are part of an international research team that has taken a significant stride toward the goal of creating thinking machines.

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by Nelson
    +18 +1

    Nanomaterials in wastewater have toxic effects on crustaceans and fish

    You may not always think about it when you do your laundry or flush the toilet, but whatever you eat, wear or apply on your skin ends up in wastewater and eventually reaches the environment. The use of nanoparticles in consumer products like textiles, foods and personal care products is increasing. What is so special about nanoparticles is their tiny size: One nanometer is one-billionth of a meter.

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by larylin
    +2 +1

    Tiny fluorescent carbon dots could make cancer treatment safer and more effective

    A pioneering new technique that could make light-based cancer treatment more effective and safer for patients, while reducing its cost, has been developed by researchers from the University of Sheffield.

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by aj0690
    +20 +1

    Graphene discovery could make room-temperature superconductors possible

    Scientists have discovered a new kind of graphene material, which researchers estimate could be used to build superconductors that work at room temperature. The breakthrough -- detailed this week in the journal Nature -- occurred when scientists formed moiré patterns with graphene sheets.

  • Current Event
    3 years ago
    by ppp
    +22 +1

    A new graphene foam stays squishy at the coldest temperatures

    Close your eyes and imagine walking along a sandy beach and then gazing over the horizon as the Sun rises. How clear is the image that springs to mind? Most people can readily conjure images inside their head - known as their mind's eye. But this year scientists have described a condition, aphantasia, in which some people are unable to visualise mental images. Niel Kenmuir, from Lancaster, has always had a blind mind's eye. He knew he was different even in childhood. "My stepfather, when I couldn't sleep, told me to count sheep, and he explained what he meant, I tried to do it and I couldn't," he says.

  • Current Event
    3 years ago
    by wetwilly87
    +4 +1

    Sorry, graphene—borophene is the new wonder material that’s got everyone excited

    Not so long ago, graphene was the great new wonder material. A super-strong, atom-thick sheet of carbon “chicken wire,” it can form tubes, balls, and other curious shapes. And because it conducts electricity, materials scientists raised the prospect of a new era of graphene-based computer processing and a lucrative graphene chip industry to boot.

  • Analysis
    3 years ago
    by Chubros
    +4 +1

    Graphene sieve makes seawater drinkable

    A UK-based team of researchers has created a graphene-based sieve capable of removing salt from seawater. The sought-after development could aid the millions of people without ready access to clean drinking water. The promising graphene oxide sieve could be highly efficient at filtering salts, and will now be tested against existing desalination membranes. It has previously been difficult to manufacture graphene-based barriers on an industrial scale.

  • Current Event
    3 years ago
    by TNY
    +25 +1

    What happened to the hyped nanomaterials?

    Carbon-based nano materials such as graphene and carbon nanotubes were predicted to have a brilliant future when they were discovered. But quality problems curb the development of new products. The problem is that it is difficult to analyse the crystal structure and there are no established standard methods for classifying the materials. But now, researchers at Karlstad University are close to a solution.

  • Current Event
    3 years ago
    by TNY
    +16 +1

    Scientists Injected Nanoparticles Into Mice's Eyes to Give Them Infrared Vision

    It’s easy to forget it, but much of the world is invisible to us. I don’t mean that in the sense of things being really tiny, or in any metaphorical way. No, most of the world is literally invisible. That’s because what we call visible light is actually a tiny sliver of the much greater electromagnetic spectrum. The rainbow we see sits in the middle of a vast continuum of wavelengths, including everything from high energy gamma and ultraviolet radiation to much lower infrared and radio waves.

  • Current Event
    3 years ago
    by ubthejudge
    +2 +1

    Scientists Have Developed New Material That is as Flexible as Elastic But Tough as Steel

    We may soon have fabrics and clothing that is as stretchy as a rubber band while simultaneously being as durable as steel.

  • Current Event
    3 years ago
    by kong88
    +2 +1

    Nanoparticles Let Mice See Near Infrared Light

    Without night vision goggles, mammals have no hope of seeing infrared light, which has wavelengths longer than light on the visible spectrum. But in a study published today (February 28) in Cell, researchers injected nanoparticles into mouse retinas, giving the rodents the ability to see near-infrared (near-IR) light at about half the resolution of visible light.

  • Current Event
    3 years ago
    by bkool
    +25 +1

    Artificial Skin Could Help Burn Victims "Feel" Again

    University of Connecticut (UConn) scientists say a new type of sensor could lead to artificial skin that someday may help burn victims “feel” again. They described their research (“An Ultra-Shapeable, Smart Sensing Platform Based on a Multimodal Ferrofluid-Infused Surface”) in Advanced Materials. “The development of wearable, all‐in‐one sensors that can simultaneously monitor several hazard conditions in a real‐time fashion imposes the emergent requirement for a smart and stretchable hazard avoidance sensing platform that is stretchable and skin‐like.

  • Analysis
    3 years ago
    by tukka
    +14 +1

    Healing kidneys with nanotechnology

    Each year, there are some 13.3 million new cases of acute kidney injury (AKI), a serious affliction. Formerly known as acute renal failure, the ailment produces a rapid buildup of nitrogenous wastes and decreases urine output, usually within hours or days of disease onset. Severe complications often ensue. Currently, there is no known cure for AKI.

  • Analysis
    3 years ago
    by drunkenninja
    +17 +1

    Brain-eating amoebae halted by silver nanoparticles

    Halloween is just around the corner, and some people will celebrate by watching scary movies about brain-eating zombies. But even more frightening are real-life parasites that feed on the human brain, and they can be harder to kill than their horror-movie counterparts. Now, researchers have developed silver nanoparticles coated with anti-seizure drugs that can kill brain-eating amoebae while sparing human cells. The researchers report their results in ACS Chemical Neuroscience.