LOUNGE all new asksnapzu ideasforsnapzu newtribes interesting pics videos funny technology science technews gaming health history worldnews business web research entertainment food living internet socialmedia mobile space sports photography nature animals movies culture travel television finance music celebrities gadgets environment usa crime politics law money justice psychology security cars wtf art google books lifetips bigbrother women apple kids recipes whoa military privacy education facebook medicine computing wildlife design war drugs middleeast diet toplists economy fail violence humor africa microsoft parenting dogs canada neuroscience architecture religion advertising infographics sex journalism disaster software aviation relationships energy booze life japan ukraine newmovies nsa cannabis name Name of the tribe humanrights nasa cute weather gifs discoveries cops futurism football earth dataviz pets guns entrepreneurship fitness android extremeweather fashion insects india northamerica
Submit a link
Start a discussion
  • Current Event
    7 days ago
    by ppp
    +12 +1

    Canada is selling fewer armoured vehicles to the Saudis than it planned

    A Canadian defence contractor will be selling fewer armoured vehicles to Saudi Arabia than originally planned, according to new documents obtained by CBC News. That could be a mixed blessing in light of the ongoing diplomatic dispute between the two countries, say human rights groups and a defence analyst.

  • Current Event
    2 weeks ago
    by aj0690
    +16 +1

    Higher minimum wage will boost economy of cities

    A small rise in the minimum wage in Britain’s main city regions would encourage employers to deploy workers more productively and help boost local economies by more than £1bn, says a thinktank. According to the study, by the Smith Institute, employers need the spur of a higher minimum wage to shake them out of a spiral of low productivity and low growth that depresses company revenues and has trapped about 2 million workers on the current minimum wage of £7.38 an hour...

  • Analysis
    2 months ago
    by jedlicka
    +8 +1

    Pay rises faster for top 1% of earners in developed world – report

    Pay is rising much faster for the top 1% of earners compared with those on average salaries in the richest countries, according to a report calling on governments to do more to tackle “wageless growth” since the financial crisis. Despite more people being in work than at any time since the onset of the banking crisis a decade ago, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development said wage growth was still “missing in action” across the 35 countries represented by the Paris-based group of wealthy nations.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by distant
    +10 +1

    The economy has slowed to a standstill, largely because of Brexit

    FOR some time Britain’s vote in June 2016 to leave the European Union appeared to be having little economic impact. Sterling slumped but GDP growth in the second half of 2016 was faster than in the first. Unemployment fell, rather than jumping, as most economists had feared. Yet the notion that the economy would escape Brexit uncertainty was always fantastical. Britain’s economy has gone from a leader to a laggard internationally, as GDP growth has slowed sharply (see chart).

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by geoleo
    +7 +1

    China pledges US$23 billion in loans and aid to Arab states

    Free-trade deals are also on the cards, as President Xi Jinping tells forum Beijing wants to ‘become the keeper of peace and stability’ in the region. Beijing will also further explore the possibility of free-trade deals with each of the 22 states in the Arab League, as Xi reiterated commitments to globalisation at a time when China is locked in a trade battle with the US. China and the Arab League – a regional bloc of states in and around North Africa, the Horn of Africa and Arabia – agreed to upgrade their bilateral ties to form a “strategic partnership of comprehensive cooperation...

  • Analysis
    4 years ago
    by Weakmorals
    +13 +1

    The great middle-class identity crisis -We are not our jobs

    We are what we do. We choose professions that suit our identity, and then those professions enhance our identity.

  • Analysis
    4 years ago
    by hxxp
    +14 +1

    The Middle Class Is Steadily Eroding. Just Ask the Business World.

    As politicians and pundits in Washington continue to spar over whether economic inequality is in fact deepening, in corporate America there really is no debate at all. The post-recession reality is that the customer base for businesses that appeal to the middle class is shrinking as the top tier pulls even further away.

  • Analysis
    4 years ago
    by TNY
    +19 +1

    More Americans see middle class status slipping

    A sense of belonging to the middle class occupies a cherished place in America. It conjures images of self-sufficient people with stable jobs and pleasant homes working toward prosperity. Yet nearly five years after the Great Recession ended, more people are coming to the painful realization that they're no longer part of it.

  • Analysis
    4 years ago
    by aj0690
    +21 +1

    The American Dream is out of reach

    The American Dream is impossible to achieve in this country. So say nearly 6 in 10 people who responded to CNNMoney's American Dream Poll, conducted by ORC International. They feel the dream - however they define it - is out of reach.

  • Analysis
    3 years ago
    by TNY
    +20 +1

    The middle class is poorer today than it was in 1989

    No wonder people are still so gloomy: the recovery hasn't one at all for middle class wealth.

  • Analysis
    2 years ago
    by TNY
    +16 +1

    Where the Middle Class Is Shrinking

    The percentage of families earning middle-class incomes fell in nearly nine out of 10 major metro areas across the country between 2000 and 2014, according to new research by the Pew Research Center. The study defined middle-class households as those making between two-thirds and twice the national median income. That was roughly $42,000 to $125,000 a year for a family of three in 2014, though adjustments were also made for the cost of living in different areas.

  • Analysis
    2 years ago
    by dynamite
    +16 +1

    Middle class incomes had their fastest growth on record last year

    Middle-class Americans and the poor enjoyed their best year of economic improvement in decades in 2015, the Census Bureau reported Tuesday, a spike that broke a years-long streak of disappointment for American workers but did not fully repair the damage inflicted by the Great Recession. Real median household income was $56,500 in 2015, the bureau reported, up from $53,700 in 2014. That 5.2 percent increase was the largest, in percentage terms, recorded by the bureau since it began tracking median income statistics in the 1960s.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by ppp
    +21 +1

    The decline of the middle class is causing even more economic damage than we realized

    I have just come across an International Monetary Fund working paper on income polarization in the United States that makes an important contribution to the secular stagnation debate. The authors — Ali Alichi, Kory Kantenga and Juan Solé — use standard econometric techniques to estimate the impact of declines in middle class incomes on total consumer spending. They find that polarization has reduced consumer spending by more than 3 percent or about $400 billion annually. If these findings stand up to scrutiny, they deserve to have a policy impact.

  • Expression
    1 year ago
    by Nelson
    +22 +1

    The Demonisation of the Working-Class Shames Our Nation

    Something very nasty is happening. A group of people, the most exploited within our society, are under attack. Their marginalisation has been going on for years. But it has accelerated disturbingly since 23 June. Few among the political class really understand them. These people live in modest homes in the grittier parts of the country. They work in factories, call centres and on building sites, often for low wages. They like football and watch Coronation Street. They sometimes hold old-fashioned views around things such as religion, family and nationhood. Some of them drive white vans.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by junglman
    +37 +1

    Democrats, Trump, and the Ongoing, Dangerous Refusal to Learn the Lesson of Brexit

    The parallels between the U.K.’s shocking approval of the Brexit referendum in June and the U.S.’ even more shocking election of Donald Trump as president last night are overwhelming. Elites (outside of populist right-wing circles) aggressively unified across ideological lines in opposition to both. Supporters of Brexit and Trump were continually maligned by the dominant media...

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by socialiguana
    +27 +1

    A Job Is More Than a Paycheck

    In the aftermath of the 2016 presidential election, I’m starting to rethink one of my basic beliefs about the economy. For a long time, I’ve believed that what mattered most for economic well-being was money. Median income, consumption, wages -- all the things I cared about most were measured in dollars. Because of this attitude, I’ve supported lots of policies aimed at boosting the amount of money in the average person’s pocket.

  • Expression
    1 year ago
    by jcscher
    +31 +1

    How to Kill the Middle Class

    Strangling public-sector unions in Wisconsin has shrunk teachers’ pay and benefits. Who’s next?

  • Analysis
    1 year ago
    by zobo
    +25 +1

    Barely Half of 30-Year-Olds Earn More Than Their Parents

    Barely half of 30-year-olds earn more than their parents did at a similar age, a research team found, an enormous decline from the early 1970s. Even rapid economic growth won’t do much to reverse the trend.

  • Expression
    1 year ago
    by aj0690
    +43 +1

    Is Universal Basic Income a Good Idea? Stick Around, Because We're About to Find out

    Upcoming UBI programs in Canada, Finland, Uganda, and other countries are very likely to tip the scales in the universal basic income debate one way or the other in 2017. Whether or not UBI is it, we need to find a solution to the problems that are inevitable as automation and AI replace human workers in the coming years.

  • Expression
    1 year ago
    by jasont
    +44 +1

    The Year in Housing: The Middle Class Can’t Afford to Live in Cities Anymore

    Cities are increasingly populated by lower-income people in subsidized housing and high income people prepared to pay $3,500 a month for a one-bedroom.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by socialiguana
    +24 +1

    Any way you calculate it, income inequality is getting worse

    A flurry of new reports have provided yet more data demonstrating that inequality is getting worse. All right, this does not qualify as a shock. But it really isn’t your imagination. The economic crisis, nearly a decade on now, has been global in scope — working people most everywhere continue to suffer while the one percent are doing just fine. One measure of this is wages.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by messi
    +33 +1

    U.S. income inequality, on rise for decades, is now highest since 1928

    President Obama took on a topic yesterday that most Americans don’t like to talk about much: inequality. There are a lot of ways to measure economic inequality (and we’ll be discussing more on Fact Tank), but one basic approach is to look at how much income flows to groups at different steps on the economic ladder. Emmanuel Saez, an economics professor at UC-Berkeley, has been doing just that for years. And according to his research, U.S. income inequality has been increasing steadily since the 1970s, and now has reached levels not seen since 1928.

  • Expression
    1 year ago
    by ppp
    +23 +1

    Is the American Dream Really Dead?

    Just a few decades ago, more than 90 percent of 30-year-olds earned more than their parents had earned at the same age. Now it’s only about 50 percent. What happened — and what can be done about it?

  • Expression
    1 year ago
    by aj0690
    +29 +1

    In Unity is Strength

    Trade unions have been demonized, demoralised and weakened by successive governments. In a time of immense economic inequality, Trade Union Congress leader, Frances O’Grady, is correct when saying “never has a strong, responsible trade union movement been so needed.” We live in an age of plentiful resources, yet these resources aren’t being shared, instead the super-rich are able to hoard wealth. In the past, unions metered this by bartering for higher wages and using their power to achieve change that benefited the working and middle class, such as equal pay, maternity pay, and health and safety laws.

  • Analysis
    1 year ago
    by geoleo
    +36 +1

    Tax Cuts Don't Lead to Economic Growth, a New 65-Year Study Finds

    Here's a brief economic history of the last quarter-century in taxes and growth. In 1990, President George H. W. Bush raised taxes, and GDP growth increased over the next five years. In 1993, President Bill Clinton raised the top marginal tax rate, and GDP growth increased over the next five years. In 2001 and 2003, President Bush cut taxes, and we faced a disappointing expansion followed by a Great Recession. Does this story prove that raising taxes helps GDP? No. Does it prove that cutting taxes hurts GDP? No.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by everlost
    +5 +1

    To Fight Inequality, Tax Land

    In the lasting debate over Thomas Piketty’s book on outsized returns on capital, a significant fact has been obscured: If you exclude land and housing, capital has not risen as a share of the U.S. economy. If you're surprised, you're not the only one. Intuition suggests this capital-output ratio should be higher today than it was in the early 1900s. Yet, in the U.S., capital excluding land and housing has been roughly constant as a share of the economy since the mid-1950s, and is lower today than at the turn of the 20th century.

  • Expression
    1 year ago
    by cone
    +16 +1

    Cutting the Gordian Knot of Technological Unemployment with Unconditional Basic Income

    Invisible Sheep, the Missing Right, and the Return of Common Wealth. In the opening of the film 2001: A Space Odyssey, viewers are shown a historic moment in time where primitive man used the first tool. It was a bone, and used like a club, it allowed a physically weaker group to overpower a physically stronger group.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by darvinhg
    +15 +1

    Top 20 Percent Of Americans 'Hoard The American Dream'

    There's a hidden force shaping our politics, says author Richard Reeves, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, and it's hidden in plain sight. In his forthcoming book, Dream Hoarders, Reeves argues that the top 20 percent of Americans — those with six-figure incomes and above — dominate the best schools, live in the best-located homes and pass on the best futures to their kids.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by socialiguana
    +15 +1

    End of coal: Failure to see it coming will hurt miners most

    Donald Trump’s decision to pull the US out of the Paris Climate Agreement was sometimes presented as the president putting coal workers first. But the history of coal mining transitions, both in Europe and the US, tells us that failing to anticipate before change comes often finishes badly for workers.

  • Analysis
    1 year ago
    by aj0690
    +29 +1

    Our Broken Economy, in One Simple Chart

    Many Americans can’t remember anything other than an economy with skyrocketing inequality, in which living standards for most Americans are stagnating and the rich are pulling away. It feels inevitable. But it’s not.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by spacepopper
    +28 +1

    The wealth gap in the US is worse than in Kenya

    Kenya has been called an unsafe place for tourists because of frequent violent crimes. Former president Barack Obama said in a speech that it's time for the country to "change habits" because "too often here in Kenya … corruption is tolerated." But there is at least one thing the country gets better than the United States: Income equality.

  • Current Event
    10 months ago
    by zobo
    +4 +1

    The World's Poorest People Are Getting Richer Faster than Anyone Else | Alexander C.R. Hammond

    Last Tuesday marked the 25th anniversary of the United Nations’ International Day for the Eradication of Poverty. The date intentionally coincides with the 30th anniversary of the Call to Action, which saw the French anti-poverty campaigner Father Joseph Wresinski ask the international community, in front of 100,000 Parisians, to “strive to eradicate extreme poverty”.

  • Analysis
    10 months ago
    by TheSpirit
    +12 +1

    The U.S. Isn’t Prepared for the Next Recession

    Maybe it will start with a failed initial public offering, followed by the revelation of widespread fraud in Silicon Valley. Perhaps energy prices will spike, sapping the finances of anyone who drives a car to work. Maybe a foreign crisis will cause a credit crunch, or President Trump will spark a global trade war. A recession might seem like a distant concern, with the latest data showing that the current, extraordinarily economic long expansion just keeps humming along.

  • Analysis
    8 months ago
    by geoleo
    +17 +1

    Retail is suffering because the middle classes have lost $1,355 trillion in income since 1970

    Nowadays, there are a lot of articles being written about the collapse of retail in the USA. Some people blame Amazon and online shopping, but that is only a trivial part of the problem. $1,355,610,000,000 of consumer spending is missing from the demand side of USA spending, and that should be kept in mind whenever you read an article about retail going through hell. The big boom in retail in the mid-20th century was thanks a strong middle class. Conversely, the collapse of income of the middle quintiles of income must lead to a contraction of retail. Consider these charts:

  • Current Event
    6 months ago
    by aj0690
    +26 +1

    Corporate America Is Suppressing Wages for Many Workers

    Even after eight years of economic recovery and steady private-sector job growth, wages for most Americans have hardly budged. It is tempting to think that wage stagnation is intractable, a result of long-term trends, like automation and globalization, that government is powerless to do anything about.