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  • Current Event
    3 days ago
    by zobo
    +33 +1

    Canada Passes A Bill That Bans The Captivity Of Dolphins And Whales

    Cetaceans like dolphins and whales will no longer be kept in Canadian aquariums after the government passed a bill that prohibits their captivity. The bill, S-203, was first proposed in 2015, and it was finally passed after three years of intense legislative battles. With the bill in effect, Canada has taken another step towards becoming more environmentally responsible. The most uplifting thing about the bill is that there was support across the political parties.

  • Analysis
    5 days ago
    by jerrycan
    +3 +1

    Sharks Could Become Deadlier and 'Right-Handed' Thanks to Climate Change

    A new study suggests that climate change could cause sharks to become "right-handed" and deadlier, which could send marine ecosystems into imbalance. A group of Port Jackson sharks, when incubated in water warmed to projected ocean temperatures at the turn of the century if greenhouse gas emissions continue at their current pace, most became "right-handed," which could cause changes in behavior that impacts marine ecosystems, according to research published in the journal Symmetry.

  • Current Event
    6 days ago
    by messi
    +25 +1

    Groundbreaking Coral Reef Recovery Method Accidentally Discovered By A Scientist

    As he was working with corals at the Mote Marine Laboratory in Florida, Dr. David Vaughan accidentally discovered a groundbreaking coral reef recovery method that makes corals grow by 40 times faster than usual.

  • Current Event
    8 days ago
    by Pfennig88
    +16 +1

    Steller's sea cow: the first historical extinction of a marine mammal at human hands

    Their closest living relatives are the dugong and manatees, known collectively as the sirenians. But while all four surviving species of sirenian live in warm tropical waters, Steller's sea cow had become highly specialised to the sub-Arctic waters of the northern Pacific Ocean. This specialisation included growing to incredible sizes: adults could reach up to 10 metres in length while weighing up to 11 tonnes, bigger than many modern whales. To put this into perspective, an adult male killer whale can come in at eight metres long and weigh up to six tonnes.

  • Video/Audio
    3 weeks ago
    by Chubros
    +12 +1

    Divers encounter bizarre, 26-foot-long sea worm

    Two divers came across a spectacular site while swimming off the coast of New Zealand. They discovered a giant creature, likely a pyrosome, gently floating in the waters. While these floating colonies have been known to get caught in fishing nets, a specimen this large is an uncommon site.

  • Current Event
    3 weeks ago
    by bradd
    +12 +1

    World's humpback whale population booming thanks to the Kimberley

    Humpback whales, once hunted around the world to the point that they became so rare that the industry built on their blubber went belly-up, is booming. The world's largest population passes through Australia's Kimberley, a region that provides ideal and undeveloped calving grounds, researchers say. Since the whaling stations were closed, humpbacks that visit Western Australia have become the good news story that defies the trend of environmental doom and gloom.

  • Current Event
    3 weeks ago
    by baron778
    +19 +1

    'Sad surprise': Amazon fish contaminated by plastic particles

    Scientists have found the first evidence of plastic contamination in freshwater fish in the Amazon, highlighting the extent to which bags, bottles and other waste dumped in rivers is affecting the world’s wildlife. Tests on the stomach contents of fish in Brazil’s Xingu River, one of the major tributaries of the Amazon, revealed plastic particles in more than 80% of the species examined, including the omnivorous parrot pacu, herbivorous redhook silver dollar, and meat-eating red-bellied piranha.

  • Current Event
    2 weeks ago
    by TNY
    +10 +1

    Humpback whale songs simplified during ‘cultural revolutions’

    Humpback whales sing increasingly complex songs, but University of Queensland researchers have discovered they may suddenly switch to something simpler, in a ‘cultural revolution’. The study examined the structure and complexity of songs sung by the eastern Australian humpback whale population over 13 consecutive years. Dr Jenny Allen from UQ’s Cetacean Ecology and Acoustics Laboratory said members of humpback whale populations were known to sing the same song at any one time.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by Apolatia
    +13 +1

    Mysterious great white shark lair discovered in Pacific Ocean

    A scientific mission into the secret ocean lair of California’s great white sharks has provided tantalizing clues into a vexing mystery — why the fearsome predators spend winter and spring in what has long appeared to be an empty void in the deep sea. A boatload of researchers from five scientific institutions visited the middle-of-nowhere spot between Baja California and Hawaii this past spring on a quest to learn more about what draws the big sharks to what has become known as the White Shark Cafe, almost as if they were pulled by some astrological stimulus.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by ubthejudge
    +9 +1

    Divers are attempting to regrow Great Barrier Reef with electricity

    A trial is underway to restore damaged coral on the Great Barrier Reef using electricity. The reef has been severely assaulted in recent years by cyclones and back-to-back heatwaves. Nathan Cook at conservation group Reef Ecologic and his colleagues are attempting to regrow surviving coral fragments on steel frames. The frames are placed on damaged parts of the reef and stimulated with electricity to accelerate the coral’s growth (see video).

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by hxxp
    +21 +1

    Scientists discovered 85 miles of deep-sea coral reef hidden off the US East Coast — here's what it looks like

    The seafloor is one of the last unexplored regions of our watery planet. On a recent expedition dubbed Deep Search 2018, a group of ocean researchers discovered 85 miles of deep-sea coral reef off the coast of the southeastern US. "Good news is too rare these days, and this is a victory that we can all share. We have found a pristine coral reef in our own backyard," Erik Cordes, the chief scientist on the expedition and a deep-sea ecologist at Temple University, wrote in a mission summary.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by Vandertoolen
    +11 +1

    Crabs and lobsters deserve protection from being cooked alive

    Crabs and lobsters have a tough time at the hands of humans. In most countries, they are excluded from the scope of animal welfare legislation, so nothing you do to them is illegal. The result is that they are treated in ways that would clearly be cruel if inflicted on a vertebrate. This might in part be because they are so alien to us. It is hard to begin to imagine the inner life of a 10-legged, faceless creature with a nervous system distributed throughout its body. Worse still, crustaceans lack the headline-grabbing intelligence of the octopus.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by rawlings
    +19 +1

    Orca 'apocalypse': half of killer whales doomed to die from pollution

    At least half of the world’s killer whale populations are doomed to extinction due to toxic and persistent pollution of the oceans, according to a major new study. Although the poisonous chemicals, PCBs, have been banned for decades, they are still leaking into the seas. They become concentrated up the food chain; as a result, killer whales, the top predators, are the most contaminated animals on the planet.

  • Analysis
    2 months ago
    by rhingo
    +15 +1

    Manta rays’ food-capturing mechanism may hold key to better filtration systems

    CORVALLIS, Ore. – Manta rays strain their tiny food from mouthfuls of seawater in a novel way that could hold the key to better filtration in a variety of commercial applications, new research by Oregon State University shows. Published today in Science Advances, the findings explain that manta rays filter zooplankton, mesoplankton and microcrustaceans with an apparatus different from anything previously seen in any biological or industrial system.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by ppp
    +19 +1

    'Biodegradeable' Plastic Balloons Are Killing Wildlife, Campaigners Warn

    Plastic advertising balloons that blow away to sea are killing seabirds, seals and other wildlife, campaigners have warned. Despite being sold as "biodegradable", the freebies handed out at local fetes and by big restaurant brands are often blown away miles to the coast. "Dolphins, whales, turtles, seabirds and other animals have been killed by balloons," a Marine Conservation Society spokesman told Sky News. "Animals swallow the balloons which can block their gut, causing them to starve.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by Pfennig88
    +1 +1

    Are we watching a real-time extinction of southern resident killer whales?

    The southern resident killer whales that feed and frolic in the Salish Sea have lost three members this year and about 20 per cent of their number in the past decade.

  • Analysis
    1 month ago
    by funhonestdude
    +15 +1

    Turtles have '22 per cent chance of dying' if they eat just one piece of plastic

    Sea turtles have more than a one in five chance of dying after ingesting a single piece of plastic, a study by CSIRO researchers reveals. Scientists analysed almost 1000 washed-up turtles on Australian beaches and found a direct link between the amount of plastic consumed and the demise of the marine animal.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by Pfennig88
    +15 +1

    Florida Man Rescues Dolphin In Distress Following Hurricane Michael

    Earlier this week, Squire was with a group of people surveying the damage at the Indian Pass Campground in Port Saint Joe, Florida, when they came upon the struggling dolphin on the beach of Saint Vincent Sound.Wasting no time, Squire jumped into action and the ocean to pull the dolphin out from under a boat ramp’s edge where it was lodged.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by zyery
    +9 +1

    UK government backs creation of Antarctic wildlife reserve

    The UK government has thrown its weight behind the creation of the world’s biggest environmental sanctuary, covering a huge swathe of the Antarctic ocean. The massive 1.8m sq km reserve – five times the size of Germany – would ban all fishing in a vast area of the Weddell Sea and parts of the Antarctic peninsula, safeguarding species including penguins, killer whales, leopard seals and blue whales.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by TNY
    +15 +1

    We can save coral reefs by putting them on ice

    The planet’s coral reefs are in trouble. Thanks to warming and acidifying oceans, the animals that make up coral reefs are dying, turning the reefs themselves into algae-covered ghost towns. This represents a loss of habitat for numerous nearby creatures, many of which evolved to only live in the reefs. So the deaths of the corals can lead to the deaths of many other species. From monitoring the reefs by listening to them to local action and working to understand the dynamics of coral illness, scientists and conservationists...

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by ubthejudge
    +2 +1

    Humans Are Screwing Up Dolphins' Abilities To Talk To Each Other

    As if humans weren’t already doing enough to destroy the planet and harm our fellow creatures, a new study has revealed that human-caused noise is hindering the ability of dolphins to communicate with one another. Dolphins ― highly intelligent and social animals ― use a complex array of whistle calls to talk to each other that some scientists have compared to human speech.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by geoleo
    +8 +1

    Near Fish Farms, Lobster Catches Plummet

    Lobster fishers catch fewer market-sized lobsters, and see fewer fertile females, in areas close to fish farms in Nova Scotia, according to new research led by Inka Milewski, a research associate at Dalhousie University in Halifax. Lobster fishers working in Port Mouton Bay, Nova Scotia, keep detailed records of when and where they fish and how many lobsters they catch.

  • Current Event
    3 years ago
    by zritic
    +20 +1

    Starfish-killing robot close to trials on Great Barrier Reef

    An autonomous starfish-killing robot is close to being ready for trials on the Great Barrier Reef, researchers say. Crown-of-thorns starfish have have been described as a significant threat to coral. The Cotsbot robot, which has a vision system, is designed to seek out starfish and give them a lethal injection. After it eradicates the bulk of starfish in a given area, human divers can move in and mop up the survivors.

  • Analysis
    3 years ago
    by larylin
    +30 +1

    Dolphin Intelligence: It’s Time for a Conversation - Breaking the communication barrier between dolphins and humans

    When one of Earth's smartest creatures vocalizes, it fuels a heated debate among scientists: Are dolphins actually speaking a complex language? Head trainer Teri Turner Bolton looks out at two young adult male dolphins, Hector and Han, whose beaks, or rostra, are poking above the water as they eagerly await a command.

  • Current Event
    3 years ago
    by belangermira
    +34 +2

    US Navy limits 'whale-harming' sonar in Pacific

    The US Navy has agreed to limit its use of sonar that may inadvertently harm whales and dolphins in waters near Hawaii and California. A federal judge in Honolulu signed the deal between the Navy and environmental groups on Monday. It restricts or bans the use of mid-frequency active sonar and explosives used in training exercises. Campaigners say that sonar disrupts the feeding of marine mammals, and can even cause deafness or death.

  • Expression
    3 years ago
    by junglman
    +27 +1

    Why do dolphins seek out encounters with humans?

    You'll have heard of Fungie, a male bottlenose who has forsaken the open sea to live inside the harbour mouth of Dingle in Ireland, a placid, shallowish inlet bordered by low verdant hills that are speckled with sheep.

  • Analysis
    3 years ago
    by zyery
    +49 +2

    Epic Eel Migration Mapped for the First Time

    Scientists know that American eels spend most of their adult lives inland or close to the shore, because for thousands of years, that’s where people have caught them. And we know the animals spawn in the open ocean, because that’s where we find their tiny, transparent larvae. But despite decades of searching, no adult American eel (Anguilla rostrata) has ever been spotted migrating across the hundreds of miles of ocean between the animals’ adult haunts and their ancestral spawning areas.

  • Current Event
    3 years ago
    by aj0690
    +47 +2

    A Japanese vessel is set to kill 333 whales for ‘research’ — but is science really behind the hunt?

    On Tuesday, Japan's whaling fleet will set out on a three-month-long hunt for minke whales. The Japanese government argues that this hunt — which will only kill 333 whales, about a third of the average yearly haul before the country's year-long whaling pause — is being done in the name of scientific research. But the U.N.'s International Court of Justice has already deemed the "scientific" program to be anything but.

  • Current Event
    3 years ago
    by TNY
    +44 +1

    In Massive Stranding, 337 Whales Beached on Chilean Coast

    The coast of southern Chile has become a grave for 337 sei whales that were found beached in what scientists say is one of the biggest whale strandings ever recorded. Biologist Vreni Haussermann told The Associated Press Tuesday that she made the discovery along with other scientists in June during an observation flight over fjords in Chile's southern Patagonia region. The team has been collecting samples since then.

  • Expression
    3 years ago
    by lostwonder
    +15 +1

    Westcountry roadkill man says he will eat washed-up dolphin for Christmas dinner

    A Westcountry man well-known for eating roadkill is planning something different for his Christmas lunch this year - a dolphin he found on the beach. Eccentric Arthur Boyt, 76, has spent years...

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by zritic
    +21 +1

    Zoological Society looking for answers to why 29 North Sea whales have been washed up on Europe’s beaches recently

    Residents along the east coast of Britain are praying they will not see a repeat of the tragedies seen in Skegness and Hunstanton where six whales have now washed up on the beach. Hundreds of people from all over the East Midlands flocked to Skegness to see three dead whales on Central Beach before they were removed to Sheffield for rendering last Wednesday. A fourth whale that beached of former Ministry of Defence (MOD) land...

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by geoleo
    +35 +1

    Dolphin Dies Being Passed Around For Selfies

    A young dolphin has died after beachgoers took it from the sea to pose for photographs with it. Huge crowds gathered around the small animal on the beach resort at Santa Teresita in Argentina after one man picked it up. But it appears it quickly overheated and died while out of the water. It was still being passed around by the beachgoers after its death and was later left discarded in the sand.

  • Expression
    2 years ago
    by dynamite
    +18 +2

    The ‘sea-nomad’ children who see like dolphins

    Unlike most people, the children of a Thailand tribe see with total clarity beneath the waves – how do they do it, and might their talent be learned? Deep in the island archipelagos on the Andaman Sea, and along the west coast of Thailand live small tribes called the Moken people, also known as sea-nomads. Their children spend much of their day in the sea, diving for food. They are uniquely adapted to this job – because...

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by drunkenninja
    +32 +2

    SeaWorld Agrees To End Captive Breeding Of Killer Whales

    In an agreement with The Humane Society of the United States, the theme park will also phase out the use of the giant marine mammals in theatrical shows.

  • Analysis
    2 years ago
    by jcscher
    +24 +1

    Bizarre Fossil Hauled its Offspring Around 'like Kites'

    Scientists who discovered the fossil have dubbed it the "kite runner".