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  • Current Event
    1 day ago
    by Pfennig88
    +11 +1

    Florida Man Rescues Dolphin In Distress Following Hurricane Michael

    Earlier this week, Squire was with a group of people surveying the damage at the Indian Pass Campground in Port Saint Joe, Florida, when they came upon the struggling dolphin on the beach of Saint Vincent Sound.Wasting no time, Squire jumped into action and the ocean to pull the dolphin out from under a boat ramp’s edge where it was lodged.

  • Analysis
    1 day ago
    by funhonestdude
    +12 +1

    Turtles have '22 per cent chance of dying' if they eat just one piece of plastic

    Sea turtles have more than a one in five chance of dying after ingesting a single piece of plastic, a study by CSIRO researchers reveals. Scientists analysed almost 1000 washed-up turtles on Australian beaches and found a direct link between the amount of plastic consumed and the demise of the marine animal.

  • Current Event
    7 days ago
    by Pfennig88
    +1 +1

    Are we watching a real-time extinction of southern resident killer whales?

    The southern resident killer whales that feed and frolic in the Salish Sea have lost three members this year and about 20 per cent of their number in the past decade.

  • Analysis
    2 weeks ago
    by rhingo
    +15 +1

    Manta rays’ food-capturing mechanism may hold key to better filtration systems

    CORVALLIS, Ore. – Manta rays strain their tiny food from mouthfuls of seawater in a novel way that could hold the key to better filtration in a variety of commercial applications, new research by Oregon State University shows. Published today in Science Advances, the findings explain that manta rays filter zooplankton, mesoplankton and microcrustaceans with an apparatus different from anything previously seen in any biological or industrial system.

  • Current Event
    2 weeks ago
    by ppp
    +19 +1

    'Biodegradeable' Plastic Balloons Are Killing Wildlife, Campaigners Warn

    Plastic advertising balloons that blow away to sea are killing seabirds, seals and other wildlife, campaigners have warned. Despite being sold as "biodegradable", the freebies handed out at local fetes and by big restaurant brands are often blown away miles to the coast. "Dolphins, whales, turtles, seabirds and other animals have been killed by balloons," a Marine Conservation Society spokesman told Sky News. "Animals swallow the balloons which can block their gut, causing them to starve.

  • Current Event
    3 weeks ago
    by Apolatia
    +13 +1

    Mysterious great white shark lair discovered in Pacific Ocean

    A scientific mission into the secret ocean lair of California’s great white sharks has provided tantalizing clues into a vexing mystery — why the fearsome predators spend winter and spring in what has long appeared to be an empty void in the deep sea. A boatload of researchers from five scientific institutions visited the middle-of-nowhere spot between Baja California and Hawaii this past spring on a quest to learn more about what draws the big sharks to what has become known as the White Shark Cafe, almost as if they were pulled by some astrological stimulus.

  • Current Event
    3 weeks ago
    by ubthejudge
    +9 +1

    Divers are attempting to regrow Great Barrier Reef with electricity

    A trial is underway to restore damaged coral on the Great Barrier Reef using electricity. The reef has been severely assaulted in recent years by cyclones and back-to-back heatwaves. Nathan Cook at conservation group Reef Ecologic and his colleagues are attempting to regrow surviving coral fragments on steel frames. The frames are placed on damaged parts of the reef and stimulated with electricity to accelerate the coral’s growth (see video).

  • Current Event
    3 weeks ago
    by hxxp
    +21 +1

    Scientists discovered 85 miles of deep-sea coral reef hidden off the US East Coast — here's what it looks like

    The seafloor is one of the last unexplored regions of our watery planet. On a recent expedition dubbed Deep Search 2018, a group of ocean researchers discovered 85 miles of deep-sea coral reef off the coast of the southeastern US. "Good news is too rare these days, and this is a victory that we can all share. We have found a pristine coral reef in our own backyard," Erik Cordes, the chief scientist on the expedition and a deep-sea ecologist at Temple University, wrote in a mission summary.

  • Current Event
    3 weeks ago
    by Vandertoolen
    +11 +1

    Crabs and lobsters deserve protection from being cooked alive

    Crabs and lobsters have a tough time at the hands of humans. In most countries, they are excluded from the scope of animal welfare legislation, so nothing you do to them is illegal. The result is that they are treated in ways that would clearly be cruel if inflicted on a vertebrate. This might in part be because they are so alien to us. It is hard to begin to imagine the inner life of a 10-legged, faceless creature with a nervous system distributed throughout its body. Worse still, crustaceans lack the headline-grabbing intelligence of the octopus.

  • Current Event
    2 weeks ago
    by rawlings
    +19 +1

    Orca 'apocalypse': half of killer whales doomed to die from pollution

    At least half of the world’s killer whale populations are doomed to extinction due to toxic and persistent pollution of the oceans, according to a major new study. Although the poisonous chemicals, PCBs, have been banned for decades, they are still leaking into the seas. They become concentrated up the food chain; as a result, killer whales, the top predators, are the most contaminated animals on the planet.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by ticktack
    +18 +1

    Grieving orca mother carries dead calf for days as whales fight for survival

    Whale is one of just 75 in an endangered group off the coast of Washington state and Canada. A grieving mother orca near Vancouver Island has been carrying her dead calf for four days, after refusing to leave her baby behind when the rest of her pod left. The mother whale, named J35 by researchers, gave birth Tuesday in what was initially a hopeful moment. Mother and female calf were seen swimming together that morning near Victoria, British Columbia, according to the Washington state-based Center for Whale Research.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by jerrycan
    +1 +1

    A giant blue whale washed up dead on a beach in Japan — and it's the country's first ever sighting of the animal

    Beachgoers in Kamakura City, Japan, received quite a shock on Sunday when a 34-foot blue whale washed up dead on the beach. The Washington Post reported that experts claimed this is the first time a blue whale has ever been recorded on Japanese shores. The cause of the mammal's death is reportedly unknown. Civil engineers were called to the beach to move the whale ashore for examination.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by TentativePrince
    +3 +1

    Venomous blue bottle jellyfish injured over 150 people at Mumbai beaches, result of global warming?

    Blue bottle jellyfish, also known as Portuguese man-of-war, were spotted on several beaches across the city, causing fear and panic among people as many instances of attacks were reported. Several locals were stung by the deadly jellyfish and suffered injuries.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by geoleo
    +23 +1

    Half of the Great Barrier Reef Is Dead

    Half of the Great Barrier Reef has been bleached to death since 2016. Mass coral bleaching, a global problem triggered by climate change, occurs when unnaturally hot ocean water destroys a reef’s colorful algae, leaving the coral to starve. The Great Barrier Reef illustrates how extensive the damage can be: Thirty percent of the coral perished in 2016, another 20 percent in 2017. The effect is akin to a forest after a devastating fire.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by canuck
    +15 +1

    Sea urchins help researchers fight reef-smothering algae

    A management approach that combines manual removal and outplanting native sea urchin is effective in reducing invasive, reef-smothering macroalgae by 85 percent on a coral reef off Oʻahu, according to researchers. Globally, the health of coral reefs is threatened due to rising ocean temperatures and ocean acidification. Local factors such as invasive macroalgae also pose a serious risk to coral reefs—monopolizing reef habitats and overgrowing and smothering native species, such as corals.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by ppp
    +11 +1

    Orca mother finally abandons dead calf she carried for more than two weeks

    Researchers say an endangered killer whale thatcarried her dead calf on her head for more than two weeks has finally abandoned the calf’s body and is back to feeding and frolicking with her pod. The Center for Whale Research in Washington state says it watched the orca, known as J35, chase a school of salmon in Haro Strait west of San Juan Island, between the US mainland and Vancouver Island, on Saturday afternoon.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by Pfennig88
    +15 +1

    Earth Has a Hidden Plastic Problem -- Scientists Are Hunting It Down

    During a research cruise to the Sargasso Sea in fall 1971 marine biologist Ed Carpenter first noticed peculiar, white specks floating amidst the mats of brown sargassum seaweed. After some investigating he discovered they were tiny bits of plastic. He was stunned. If thousands of the broken down particles were showing up in in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean, 550 miles from any mainland, he says, “I figured it’s all over the place.”

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by wetwilly87
    +8 +1

    Older than dinosaurs: last South African coelacanths threatened by oil exploration

    Bright blue, older than dinosaurs and weighing as much as an average-sized man, coelacanths are the most endangered fish in South Africa and among the rarest in the world. Barely 30 of these critically-endangered fish are known to exist off the east coast of South Africa, raising concern that a new oil exploration venture in the area could jeopardise their future.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by Apolatia
    +12 +1

    Why a new fisheries bill is being dubbed the "Empty Oceans Act"

    What the farm bill is to terrestrial food production, the fish bill, a.k.a. the Magnuson-Stevens Act, is to the ocean—the law that governs America’s marine fisheries. First passed in 1976 to kick foreign fishing fleets out of American waters, the MSA has evolved into one of the nation’s most effective conservation laws. A reauthorization in 1996 required managers to place all overfished stocks on strict rebuilding timelines, and another in 2006 mandated hard limits on total catches. Those science-based provisions have recovered 44 once-depleted stocks, from the canary rockfish to the barndoor skate.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by gottlieb
    +12 +1

    'They are taking out a generation of tuna': overfishing causes crisis in Philippines

    Raul Gomez is an old man who fishes with five crew on a clipper in the seas known as the coral triangle, and he has spent two months now without taking enough to feed his family. Riding out storms and searing heat in western Pacific waters, the burly, sun-inked Filipino uses a pole and line to reel in yellowfin tuna the size of an adult human. This has been his trade for 40 years, but it is becoming tougher as fisheries in this region – one of the planet’s most important centres of tuna production – face the prospect of total collapse.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by robmonk
    +10 +1

    A new dimension to marine restoration: 3D printing coral reefs

    The local fishermen looked on skeptically. From the deck of a small motorboat, scuba divers grabbed odd chunks of ceramic – which could be described as rocky brains stuck on stumpy stilts – and plunged into the aquamarine waters. The dive team assembled the pieces as a few triggerfish circled around to investigate the commotion.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by aj0690
    +17 +1

    Scientists discover hidden deep-sea coral reef off South Carolina Coast

    If you think Charleston, South Carolina, has plenty of history within its pre-Colonial grounds, just look at what’s been hiding 160 miles off the city’s coast for thousands of years: a giant deep-sea coral reef system. The chief scientist who helped make the discovery called it unbelievable.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by grandsalami
    +11 +1

    Australia unveils starfish-killing robot to protect Barrier Reef

    A robot submarine able to hunt and kill the predatory crown-of-thorns starfish devastating the Great Barrier Reef was unveiled by Australian researchers on Friday. Scientists at Queensland University of Technology (QUT) said the robot, named the RangerBot and developed with a grant from Google, would serve as a "robo reef protector" for the vast World Heritage site off Australia's northeastern coast.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by Apolatia
    +22 +1

    Wild dolphins can 'walk on water' by copying tricks from captive animals

    Wild dolphins have learned how to walk on water by copying tricks developed by captive animals, a 30-year study found. Scientists in Australia observed that dolphins in Adelaide learned tail-walking – when the animal rises vertically out of the water and moves forward or backwards across it – from a dolphin called Billie which had spent time in a dolphinarium. Dolphins rarely do this in the wild but it is a standard part of the routine in almost all dolphinaria.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by everlost
    +22 +1

    World’s Largest Ocean Cleanup System Is Finally Ready to Launch

    Since 2015, we've been following the story of Boyan Slat, a young inventor who set out to fight against the world's plastic pollution problem. At only 20 years old, he developed an invention aimed at tackling the world's largest patch of garbage, the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. This vortex of trash, located between California and Hawaii, covers 600,000 square miles of ocean and is responsible for countless animal deaths.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by hxxp
    +19 +1

    It’s the Biggest Oyster Found in New York in 100 Years. And It Has Stories to Tell.

    It has people, and its people call it Big. And doesn’t everyone who is fawned over and photographed like a celebrity have people? Not Mr. Big, as in “Sex and the City,” or Big Daddy or Big Mama, as in “Cat on a Hot Tin Roof.” And not Biggie, like Biggie Smalls, the Notorious B.I.G. Just Big.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by belangermira
    +19 +1

    Bid to reduce right whale deaths 'extremely effective,' Canadian officials say

    A year after the population of critically endangered North Atlantic right whales suffered devastating losses, Canadian officials say measures taken this season to protect the species have worked. With the summer fishing season in the Gulf of St. Lawrence drawing to a close, the federal Fisheries Department confirmed Friday that not one whale has died as a result of a ship strike or fishing gear entanglement — the main causes for most of the deaths last season.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by TNY
    +31 +1

    The Great Barrier Reef Is Showing 'Significant Signs Of Recovery'

    After decades of damning reports, bleak images, and depressing headlines, one new report claims to have a “positive update” on the Great Barrier Reef (GBR). The Reef & Rainforest Research Centre (RRRC), a non-profit organization, has published a report for the Queensland State Government that claims parts of the GBR are showing some “signification signs” of recovery from years of bleaching.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by grandsalami
    +11 +1

    Could the ban on killing whales end?

    Few conservation issues generate as emotional a response as whaling. Are we now about to see countries killing whales for profit again? Commercial whaling has been effectively banned for more than 30 years, after some whales were driven almost to extinction. But the International Whaling Committee (IWC) is currently meeting in Brazil and next week will give its verdict on a proposal from Japan to end the ban.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by belangermira
    +16 +1

    'One of the boys': Beluga whales adopt lost narwhal in St. Lawrence River

    An unusual visitor has been hanging out in the St. Lawrence River for the past three years: A narwhal, more than 1,000 kilometres south of its usual range. But the lone narwhal is not alone — it appears he has been adopted by a band of belugas. The narwhal — thought to be a juvenile male because of its half-metre-long tusk — was filmed in July playing among a pod of young belugas, thought to be mostly or all males.

  • Current Event
    3 years ago
    by zritic
    +20 +1

    Starfish-killing robot close to trials on Great Barrier Reef

    An autonomous starfish-killing robot is close to being ready for trials on the Great Barrier Reef, researchers say. Crown-of-thorns starfish have have been described as a significant threat to coral. The Cotsbot robot, which has a vision system, is designed to seek out starfish and give them a lethal injection. After it eradicates the bulk of starfish in a given area, human divers can move in and mop up the survivors.

  • Analysis
    3 years ago
    by larylin
    +30 +1

    Dolphin Intelligence: It’s Time for a Conversation - Breaking the communication barrier between dolphins and humans

    When one of Earth's smartest creatures vocalizes, it fuels a heated debate among scientists: Are dolphins actually speaking a complex language? Head trainer Teri Turner Bolton looks out at two young adult male dolphins, Hector and Han, whose beaks, or rostra, are poking above the water as they eagerly await a command.

  • Current Event
    3 years ago
    by belangermira
    +34 +2

    US Navy limits 'whale-harming' sonar in Pacific

    The US Navy has agreed to limit its use of sonar that may inadvertently harm whales and dolphins in waters near Hawaii and California. A federal judge in Honolulu signed the deal between the Navy and environmental groups on Monday. It restricts or bans the use of mid-frequency active sonar and explosives used in training exercises. Campaigners say that sonar disrupts the feeding of marine mammals, and can even cause deafness or death.

  • Expression
    2 years ago
    by junglman
    +27 +1

    Why do dolphins seek out encounters with humans?

    You'll have heard of Fungie, a male bottlenose who has forsaken the open sea to live inside the harbour mouth of Dingle in Ireland, a placid, shallowish inlet bordered by low verdant hills that are speckled with sheep.

  • Analysis
    2 years ago
    by zyery
    +49 +2

    Epic Eel Migration Mapped for the First Time

    Scientists know that American eels spend most of their adult lives inland or close to the shore, because for thousands of years, that’s where people have caught them. And we know the animals spawn in the open ocean, because that’s where we find their tiny, transparent larvae. But despite decades of searching, no adult American eel (Anguilla rostrata) has ever been spotted migrating across the hundreds of miles of ocean between the animals’ adult haunts and their ancestral spawning areas.