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  • Current Event
    3 weeks ago
    by TentativePrince
    +8 +1

    The alarming trend of beached whales filled with plastic, explained

    Another dead whale has washed ashore with a belly full of plastic. This week, the carcass of the young sperm whale, estimated to have been 7 years old, was found on a beach in Cefalù, Italy. Investigators aren’t certain whether the plastic killed the whale. But it’s part of a gruesome pattern that’s become impossible to ignore. In April, a pregnant sperm whale washed up on a beach in Sardinia with nearly 50 pounds’ worth of plastic bags, containers, and tubing in her stomach.

  • Current Event
    2 weeks ago
    by baron778
    +22 +1

    NYC shores flooded with whales and experts think they know why

    The number of whales spotted in the waters off New York City has increased by 540 percent in the last eight years, according to researchers. In 2010, experts from non-profit Gotham Whale identified just five whales in local waters across the whole year. However, in 2018, the number of sightings jumped to a staggering 272, the vast majority being humpbacks, Patch reported.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by ppp
    +2 +1

    Coral study traces excess nitrogen to Maui wastewater treatment facility

    A new method for reconstructing changes in nitrogen sources over time has enabled scientists to connect excess nutrients in the coastal waters of West Maui, Hawaii, to a sewage treatment facility that injects treated wastewater into the ground.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by cone
    +16 +1

    Aquaculture Doesn’t Reduce Pressure on Wild Fish

    Aquaculture is often promoted as a sustainable alternative to catching wild fish—a way to reduce pressure on overexploited stocks while providing affordable and necessary protein for people’s diets. It’s an argument put forward by major international organizations like the World Bank and the intergovernmental Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. But it’s an argument that doesn’t hold up, according to new research.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by kong88
    +20 +1

    Russia moves to free nearly 100 captive whales after outcry

    Russian authorities have decided to free nearly 100 whales held in cages in the country’s far east, according to reports. Images of the whales, kept in cramped enclosures in a bay near the Sea of Japan port city of Nakhodka, first appeared last year, triggering a storm of criticism. The animals had been captured by a company that planned to sell them to China but the Kremlin intervened and ordered local authorities to find a way of freeing them.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by belangermira
    +8 +1

    Endangered whale experiencing mini-baby boom off New England

    An endangered species of whale is experiencing a mini-baby boom in New England waters, researchers on Cape Cod have said. The North Atlantic right whale is one of the rarest species of whale on the planet, numbering only about 411. But the Center for Coastal Studies in Provincetown, Massachusetts, said Friday its aerial survey team spotted two mom and calf pairs in Cape Cod Bay a day earlier. That brings the number seen in New England waters alone this year to three.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by wildcard
    +10 +1

    Radical climate action 'critical' to Great Barrier Reef's survival, government body says

    Australia's top Great Barrier Reef officials warn the natural wonder will virtually collapse if the planet becomes 1.5 degrees hotter – a threshold that scientists say requires shutting down coal within three decades. This federal election campaign is a potential tipping point for Australia's direction on climate action, as the major parties pledge distinctly different targets for cutting greenhouse gas emissions.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by spacepopper
    +30 +1

    Warming pushes lobsters and other species to seek cooler homes

    This is the eighth in a 10-part series about the ongoing global impacts of climate change. These stories will look at the current effects of a changing planet, what the emerging science suggests is behind those changes and what we all can do to adapt to them. Last August, the Gulf of Maine experienced a heat wave. Average water temperatures at the surface reached the second-highest level ever recorded: 20.52° Celsius (68.93° Fahrenheit). That’s still a bit chilly for any person who might go for a dip. And it’s even colder diving beneath the surface.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by spacepopper
    +16 +1

    'Ghost nets' to be tracked and removed from the sea

    Lost nets and fishing gear could be removed from the ocean using new technology in a move that would help reduce the risk of sea life being injured or dying from human debris in the ocean. Known as "ghost nets", the equipment can choke coral reefs, damage habitats, trap fish, birds and mammals. The nets also break down over time, adding to the amount of microplastic (plastic less than 5mm long) clogging up the sea and finding its way into the food chain.

  • Analysis
    1 month ago
    by TNY
    +24 +1

    This shrimplike creature makes aluminum armor to survive the deep sea’s crushing pressure

    Amphipods—small, shrimplike crustaceans in most aquatic ecosystems—start to fall apart once they hit depths of 4500 meters. There, a combination of crushing pressures, low temperature, and higher acidity causes the calcium carbonate in their exoskeletons to dissolve, making them vulnerable to pressure and predators. Now, scientists have discovered how one species, Hirondellea gigas, can survive in the deepest part of the ocean: with aluminum suits of armor.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by rawlings
    +7 +1

    As oceans warm, microbes could pump more CO2 back into air, study warns

    A new study suggests that CO2 regeneration may become faster in many regions of the world as the oceans warm with changing climate. This, in turn, may reduce the deep oceans' ability to keep carbon locked up. The study shows that in many cases, bacteria are consuming more plankton at shallower depths than previously believed, and that the conditions under which they do this will spread as water temperatures rise.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by funhonestdude
    +4 +1

    Box jellyfish: Australian researchers find antidote for world's most venomous creature

    An antidote has been discovered for the world’s most venomous creature, the Australian box jellyfish. Researchers at the University of Sydney have found an antidote for the sting of the jellyfish – which carries enough venom to kill more than 60 people. A single sting from the creature will cause excruciating pain and skin necrosis and, if the dose of venom is large enough, cardiac arrest and death within just minutes.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by geoleo
    +12 +1

    Huge oysters emerge from warm waters of UAE

    Before the UAE struck it rich with oil, the region had a different source of wealth -- pearl oysters. The naturally occurring treasures once formed the backbone of its economy, but their significance dwindled by the early 1900s as a result of Japanese techniques for cultivating immaculate pearls. Now a new type of oyster is flourishing in the Persian Gulf -- the edible kind. And they could soon help the United Arab Emirates reduce its need to import up to 85% of its food, including European oysters.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by melaniee
    +21 +1

    In the deep, dark ocean fish have evolved superpowered vision

    When the ancestors of cave fish and certain crickets moved into pitchblack caverns, their eyes virtually disappeared over generations. But fish that ply the sea at depths greater than sunlight can penetrate have developed super-vision, highly attuned to the faint glow and twinkle given off by other creatures. They owe this power, evolutionary biologists have learned, to an extraordinary increase in the number of genes for rod opsins, retinal proteins that detect dim light.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by roxxy
    +6 +1

    Thailand bay made popular by 'The Beach' to remain closed for two more years

    A victim of its own success, the most famous beach in Thailand is set to be tourist-free for at least another two years. Maya Bay, the stunning cove made famous by "The Beach," the 2000 film starring Leonardo DiCaprio, has already been shuttered for almost a year, and will likely remain closed for two more years to allow for its natural resources to regenerate, according to Songtam Suksawang, director of Thailand's National Parks Department (NPD).

  • Current Event
    3 weeks ago
    by messi
    +12 +1

    These tiny, mysterious fish may be key to solving coral reef ‘paradox’

    If a snorkeler or scuba diver is lucky enough to spy a cryptobenthic fish—named for its elusive nature—all they may glimpse is a brief flash of color. But these tiny swimmers may be a cornerstone of coral reefs, making it possible for bigger, more charismatic fish and many invertebrates to thrive, according to a new study. And they could help solve a mystery that stumped even the father of evolution, Charles Darwin.

  • Current Event
    3 years ago
    by zritic
    +20 +1

    Starfish-killing robot close to trials on Great Barrier Reef

    An autonomous starfish-killing robot is close to being ready for trials on the Great Barrier Reef, researchers say. Crown-of-thorns starfish have have been described as a significant threat to coral. The Cotsbot robot, which has a vision system, is designed to seek out starfish and give them a lethal injection. After it eradicates the bulk of starfish in a given area, human divers can move in and mop up the survivors.

  • Analysis
    3 years ago
    by larylin
    +30 +1

    Dolphin Intelligence: It’s Time for a Conversation - Breaking the communication barrier between dolphins and humans

    When one of Earth's smartest creatures vocalizes, it fuels a heated debate among scientists: Are dolphins actually speaking a complex language? Head trainer Teri Turner Bolton looks out at two young adult male dolphins, Hector and Han, whose beaks, or rostra, are poking above the water as they eagerly await a command.

  • Current Event
    3 years ago
    by belangermira
    +34 +2

    US Navy limits 'whale-harming' sonar in Pacific

    The US Navy has agreed to limit its use of sonar that may inadvertently harm whales and dolphins in waters near Hawaii and California. A federal judge in Honolulu signed the deal between the Navy and environmental groups on Monday. It restricts or bans the use of mid-frequency active sonar and explosives used in training exercises. Campaigners say that sonar disrupts the feeding of marine mammals, and can even cause deafness or death.

  • Expression
    3 years ago
    by junglman
    +27 +1

    Why do dolphins seek out encounters with humans?

    You'll have heard of Fungie, a male bottlenose who has forsaken the open sea to live inside the harbour mouth of Dingle in Ireland, a placid, shallowish inlet bordered by low verdant hills that are speckled with sheep.

  • Analysis
    3 years ago
    by zyery
    +49 +2

    Epic Eel Migration Mapped for the First Time

    Scientists know that American eels spend most of their adult lives inland or close to the shore, because for thousands of years, that’s where people have caught them. And we know the animals spawn in the open ocean, because that’s where we find their tiny, transparent larvae. But despite decades of searching, no adult American eel (Anguilla rostrata) has ever been spotted migrating across the hundreds of miles of ocean between the animals’ adult haunts and their ancestral spawning areas.

  • Current Event
    3 years ago
    by aj0690
    +47 +2

    A Japanese vessel is set to kill 333 whales for ‘research’ — but is science really behind the hunt?

    On Tuesday, Japan's whaling fleet will set out on a three-month-long hunt for minke whales. The Japanese government argues that this hunt — which will only kill 333 whales, about a third of the average yearly haul before the country's year-long whaling pause — is being done in the name of scientific research. But the U.N.'s International Court of Justice has already deemed the "scientific" program to be anything but.

  • Current Event
    3 years ago
    by TNY
    +44 +1

    In Massive Stranding, 337 Whales Beached on Chilean Coast

    The coast of southern Chile has become a grave for 337 sei whales that were found beached in what scientists say is one of the biggest whale strandings ever recorded. Biologist Vreni Haussermann told The Associated Press Tuesday that she made the discovery along with other scientists in June during an observation flight over fjords in Chile's southern Patagonia region. The team has been collecting samples since then.

  • Expression
    3 years ago
    by lostwonder
    +15 +1

    Westcountry roadkill man says he will eat washed-up dolphin for Christmas dinner

    A Westcountry man well-known for eating roadkill is planning something different for his Christmas lunch this year - a dolphin he found on the beach. Eccentric Arthur Boyt, 76, has spent years...

  • Current Event
    3 years ago
    by zritic
    +21 +1

    Zoological Society looking for answers to why 29 North Sea whales have been washed up on Europe’s beaches recently

    Residents along the east coast of Britain are praying they will not see a repeat of the tragedies seen in Skegness and Hunstanton where six whales have now washed up on the beach. Hundreds of people from all over the East Midlands flocked to Skegness to see three dead whales on Central Beach before they were removed to Sheffield for rendering last Wednesday. A fourth whale that beached of former Ministry of Defence (MOD) land...

  • Current Event
    3 years ago
    by geoleo
    +35 +1

    Dolphin Dies Being Passed Around For Selfies

    A young dolphin has died after beachgoers took it from the sea to pose for photographs with it. Huge crowds gathered around the small animal on the beach resort at Santa Teresita in Argentina after one man picked it up. But it appears it quickly overheated and died while out of the water. It was still being passed around by the beachgoers after its death and was later left discarded in the sand.

  • Expression
    3 years ago
    by dynamite
    +18 +2

    The ‘sea-nomad’ children who see like dolphins

    Unlike most people, the children of a Thailand tribe see with total clarity beneath the waves – how do they do it, and might their talent be learned? Deep in the island archipelagos on the Andaman Sea, and along the west coast of Thailand live small tribes called the Moken people, also known as sea-nomads. Their children spend much of their day in the sea, diving for food. They are uniquely adapted to this job – because...

  • Current Event
    3 years ago
    by drunkenninja
    +32 +2

    SeaWorld Agrees To End Captive Breeding Of Killer Whales

    In an agreement with The Humane Society of the United States, the theme park will also phase out the use of the giant marine mammals in theatrical shows.

  • Analysis
    3 years ago
    by jcscher
    +24 +1

    Bizarre Fossil Hauled its Offspring Around 'like Kites'

    Scientists who discovered the fossil have dubbed it the "kite runner".

  • Current Event
    3 years ago
    by Chubros
    +23 +1

    Scientists are streaming a live video feed of the Mariana Trench right NOW

    Scientists just estimated that Earth could contain as many as 1 trillion species, an incredible 99.999 percent of which are currently undiscovered. And it's a good bet that a whole lot of those mystery creatures are hiding out at the bottom of the ocean, which is just one of the reasons why this live video feed is so awesome. Stick it on at work and you could witness something no other human has ever seen before - or at the very least, you'll get scientists cracking jokes...

  • Current Event
    3 years ago
    by hxxp
    +28 +1

    Abandoned Tanker Mysteriously Washes Ashore in Liberia

    An abandoned oil tanker has mysteriously washed ashore in Liberia leaving officials scratching their heads as to how it got there and what exactly happened to its crew. According to local reports the vessel emblazoned with the name Tamaya 1 was discovered washed up on a beach in Robertsport, Liberia on Wednesday with no sign of any crew. AIS data from MarineTraffic.com shows the Tamaya 1 is a 63-meter oil products tanker flagged in Panama.

  • Current Event
    3 years ago
    by canuck
    +32 +1

    Malaysia just established a one million hectare marine park

    Malaysia has just established the biggest marine protected area (MPA) in the country. The Tun Mustapha park (TMP) occupies 1m hectares (2.47m acres) of seascape off the northern tip of Sabah province in Borneo, a region containing the second largest concentration of coral reefs in Malaysia as well as other important habitats like mangroves, sea grass beds and productive fishing grounds.

  • Current Event
    3 years ago
    by timex
    +10 +1

    Electric eels use 'leaping attacks' to defend themselves, study finds

    A well-known account of an epic battle between electric eels and horses, long unsubstantiated by scientific evidence, now appears more realistic thanks to new research demonstrating these aquatic creatures are capable of targeting land threats with powerful electrical shocks. The study, led by Vanderbilt University biologist Kenneth Catania and published online Monday in the Proceedings of the National...

  • Video/Audio
    2 years ago
    by 8mm
    +2 +1

    Watch these amazing octopuses stand up on two legs and run (video)

    As if they weren't remarkable enough, now we can add "prancing about on a pair of arms" to the cephalopod's impressive bag of tricks. They can virtually disappear into their surroundings and when things get rough, they can swim away with jet propulsion. So why would some species of octopus – creatures that have no bones to support their bodies – set two arms on the ground and take a bipedal-style ramble to flee from a predator?

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by TNY
    +33 +1

    Giant Clam Poaching Wipes Out Reefs in South China Sea

    More than 40 square miles (104 square kilometers) of coral reefs—some of the most biodiverse on Earth—have been destroyed by giant clam poaching in the South China Sea, according to a new analysis of satellite imagery. The poachers use boat propellers to loosen the valuable bivalves, which can weigh up to 500 pounds (227 kilograms) and are a luxury item in China. Carving up a reef leaves it barren of life. And because reefs in the region are often interconnected, the damage in one place can have repercussions elsewhere. Another 22 square miles (58 square kilometers) of reef have been destroyed by island-building activities...