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  • Current Event
    2 days ago
    by geoleo
    +13 +3

    Female dragonflies fake their own deaths to avoid males harassing them for sex

    In order to avoid males of the species bothering them for sex, female dragonflies fake their own deaths, falling from the sky and lying motionless on the ground until the suitor goes away. A study by Rassim Khelifa, a zoologist from the University of Zurich is the first time scientists have seen odonates feign death as a tactic to avoid mating, and a rare instance of animals faking their own deaths for this purpose. Odonates is the order of carnivorous insects that includes dragonflies and damselflies.

  • Current Event
    5 days ago
    by larylin
    +13 +3

    Sea otters' tool use leaves behind distinctive archaeological evidence

    An international team of researchers has analyzed the use by sea otters of large, shoreline rocks as “anvils” to break open shells, as well as the resulting shell middens. The researchers used ecological and archaeological approaches to identify patterns that are characteristic of sea otter use of such locations. By looking at evidence of past anvil stone use, scientists could better understand sea otter habitat use.

  • Current Event
    12 days ago
    by everlost
    +17 +4

    Scientists Still Stumped By The Evolution of Human Breasts

    “How about breasts?” The question came from a jock-y guy in one of my graduate school classes on human evolution. Far from offensive, the query was appropriate and astute. My classmates and I nodded approval, and the professor added it to a growing list on the board. We were brainstorming features that distinguish our species, Homo sapiens, from other primates. That list includes human peculiarities like big brains, upright walking, language, furless bodies … and permanently enlarged breasts after puberty.

  • Analysis
    2 weeks ago
    by kxh
    +16 +5

    Evolution made humans less aggressive

    New research shows that Homo Sapiens is a domesticated form of our species. And that’s the result of the invention of capital punishment. But how could our low aggressiveness evolve from repeated acts of violence?

  • Analysis
    7 days ago
    by Bluesky2705
    +1 +1

    Survival of the Friendliest - Issue 46: Balance - Nautilus

    Violence has been the sire of all the world’s values,” wrote poet Robinson Jeffers in 1940. It’s time to give the violent metaphors of evolution a break. Evolution is not a weapons race, but a peace treaty among interdependent nations.

  • Analysis
    2 weeks ago
    by Bluesky2705
    +4 +2

    Why Are There So Many Marsupials in Australia?

    Where did marsupials come from? (Hint: It's not Australia.)

  • Current Event
    10 days ago
    by TNY
    +13 +1

    'A big jump': People might have lived in Australia twice as long as we thought

    Extensive archaeological research in southern Victoria has again raised the prospect that people have lived in Australia for 120,000 years – twice as long as the broadly accepted period of human continental habitation. The research, with its contentious potential implications for Indigenous habitation of the continent that came to be Australia, has been presented to the Royal Society of Victoria by a group of academics including Jim Bowler...

  • Current Event
    3 weeks ago
    by Nelson
    +7 +2

    A New Species of Tiny Tyrannosaur Helps Explain the Rise of T. rex

    Scientists have discovered a new species of tiny tyrannosaur that lived some 95 million years ago in what’s now Utah. The find helps fill a frustrating gap in the fossil record at a critical time when tyrannosaurs were evolving from small, speedy hunters, into the bone-crushing apex predators we know so well. The new dinosaur has been dubbed Moros intrepidus, and its name means “harbinger of doom.” The creature, known only from a leg bone and some various teeth, weighed under 200 pounds as a fully-grown adult. It was a specialist predator and scientists say it was fast enough to easily run down prey while avoiding other meat-eaters.

  • Analysis
    3 months ago
    by lostwonder
    +16 +7

    Why the chicken is a symbol of our times

    With around 23 billion chickens on the planet at any one time, the bird is a symbol of our times, say scientists.

  • Expression
    2 months ago
    by AdelleChattre
    +17 +3

    Animals with 'night vision goggles'

    Could you survive in pitch-black conditions? Meet the animals that not only survive but thrive. By Jonathan Amos.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by yuriburi
    +15 +3

    Ancient-human species mingled in Siberia’s hottest property for 300,000 years

    Neanderthals and Denisovans might have lived side by side for tens of thousands of years, scientists report in two papers in Nature1,2. The long-awaited studies are based on the analysis of bones, artefacts and sediments from Denisova Cave in southern Siberia, which is dotted with ancient-human remains. They provide the first detailed history of the site’s 300,000-year occupation by different groups of ancient humans.

  • Expression
    7 months ago
    by AdelleChattre
    +26 +7

    Warm-Blooded Plants

    Why do these plants do this? By Cynthia Wood.

  • Current Event
    7 months ago
    by larylin
    +13 +5

    Homo erectus were too short-sighted and lazy to survive, research finds

    It may have been a lazy, 'why bother?' attitude that led to the downfall of an early species of human, according to new research. Findings from the Australian National University after an archaeological excavation in Saudi Arabia found Homo erectus tended to do the bare minimum to get by, while other species of human were inclined to put in the effort. They used "least-effort strategies" for tool making and collection of resources, as opposed to Homo sapiens and Neanderthals, who would climb mountains and haul materials over dozens of kilometres to ensure they had quality goods, the research showed.

  • Current Event
    7 months ago
    by AdelleChattre
    +34 +5

    Bizarre Newts Live Their Whole Lives, and Reproduce, As Babies

    Salamanders in the European Alps and elsewhere can put off developing into adults for years—or their entire lives—in certain circumstances. By Elizabeth Anne Brown.

  • Analysis
    7 months ago
    by CatLady
    +23 +5

    Human big toe was 'late to evolve'

    Our big toe was one of the last parts of the foot to become human-like, as our early ancestors evolved to walk on two legs.

  • Current Event
    6 months ago
    by messi
    +21 +7

    New species of blind eel that burrows through the soil discovered

    Considered by many to be the least fish-like of fishes, swamp eels are a real oddity and rarely documented. Now Museum scientists have described an entirely new species. The fish was discovered not in water but in damp soil. Museum researcher Dr Rachunliu G Kamei uncovered it while searching the rainforest for an entirely different group of animal, the legless amphibians called caecilians.

  • Current Event
    4 months ago
    by spacepopper
    +15 +4

    Elephants are evolving to lose their tusks

    The oldest elephants wandering Mozambique’s Gorongosa National Park bear the indelible markings of the civil war that gripped the country for 15 years: Many are tuskless. They’re the lone survivors of a conflict that killed about 90 percent of these beleaguered animals, slaughtered for ivory to finance weapons and for meat to feed the fighters.

  • Current Event
    4 months ago
    by TNY
    +18 +4

    Paleontologists brought to tears, laughter by Creation Museum

    For a group of paleontologists, a tour of the Creation Museum seemed like a great tongue-in-cheek way to cap off a serious conference. But while there were a few laughs and some clowning for the camera, most left more offended than amused by the frightening way in which evolution -- and their life's work -- was attacked.

  • Current Event
    4 months ago
    by zyery
    +16 +2

    Neanderthals Were Just As Violent As Early Humans

    Is it time to put the stereotype of the violent and brutish Neanderthal to rest? New research paints a different picture of the ancient hominin — one that looks similar to Homo sapiens. Researchers previously thought that Neanderthal lives were far more nasty, brutish and short than ancient H. sapiens, based mainly on studies looking at levels of injury among both groups. Now, however, in a much more comprehensive look, a team of University of Tübingen (UIT) researchers found that both Neanderthals and H. sapiens living in the Ice Age sustained similar levels of head trauma.

  • Current Event
    4 months ago
    by zyery
    +22 +4

    Why 'Vampire Deer' Have Fangs, While Other Hoofed Mammals Have Horns

    When do you need a broadsword, and when would you be better off with a dagger? That’s the question that faced artiodactyls, the group of mammals that includes deer, antelope, goats, giraffes, pigs, buffalo and cows, during their evolution. Many male artiodactyls fight over females using weaponized body parts such as horns and antlers. But pigs and several groups of deerlike animals have tusks instead, and a few species have both. Water deer have tusks so pronounced they are nicknamed “vampire deer.”

  • Current Event
    4 months ago
    by larylin
    +16 +2

    How Did Life Emerge?

    How did life begin? Two common answers come to mind. One is that, at some point, a deity decided to suspend the laws of physics and will a slew of slimy creatures into being. A second is that a one-in-a-trillion collision of just the right atoms billions of years ago happened to produce a molecular blob with the unprecedented capacity to reproduce itself.

  • Current Event
    4 months ago
    by Petrox
    +15 +4

    Neandertals probably lived a much less violent- life's than modern humans which their skull damage suggests

    Neandertals are shaking off their notoriety for being head bangers. Our nearby transformative cousins experienced a lot of head wounds, yet no more so than late Stone Age people, an investigation proposes. Rates of cracks and other bone harm in a huge example of Neandertal and old Homo sapiens skulls generally coordinate rates recently revealed for human foragers and agriculturists who have lived inside the previous 10,000 years, closes a group driven by paleoanthropologist Katerina Harvati of the University of Tübingen in Germany.

  • Current Event
    4 months ago
    by wetwilly87
    +16 +5

    Evolutionary biologists uncover new branch on Tree of Life in rare discovery published in Nature

    Scientists at Dalhousie Universityhave discovered a new branch on the ‘Tree of Life’ that no one knew existed. Their findings were published today in the journal Nature and will be critical to better understanding the evolutionary history of life on earth. “This discovery literally redraws our branch of the ‘Tree of Life’ at one of its deepest points,” explains Alastair Simpson, the lead author of the study and biology professor at Dalhousie. “It opens a new door to understanding the evolution of complex cells—and their ancient origins—back well before animals and plants emerged on Earth.”

  • Current Event
    4 months ago
    by TNY
    +12 +3

    Tiny raptor tracks lead to big discovery

    Tracks made by dinosaurs the size of sparrows have been discovered in South Korea by an international team of palaeontologists. University of Queensland researcher Dr Anthony Romilio was part of the team which described the tracks, which were originally found by Professor Kyung Soo Kim from Chinju National University of Education, South Korea.

  • Current Event
    3 months ago
    by kong88
    +18 +5

    Exclusive: Controversial skeleton may be a new species of early human

    More than twenty years after it was first discovered, an analysis of a remarkable skeleton discovered in South Africa has finally been published – and the specimen suggests we may need to add a new species to the family tree of early human ancestors. The analysis also found evidence that the species was evolving to become better at striding on two legs, helping us to understand when our lineage first became bipedal. The specimen, nicknamed “Little Foot”, is a type of Australopithecus, the group of hominins to which the famous fossil “Lucy” belonged.

  • Review
    2 months ago
    by AdelleChattre
    +2 +1

    Hive Mentalities

    Bees evolved from wasp ancestors around 100 million years ago. Their shift to a vegetarian diet had a profound effect on the evolution of flowering plants. By Tim Flannery.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by TentativePrince
    +3 +1

    Human evolution’s ties to tectonics

    In this age of worldwide climatic deterioration, many authors have documented what we are doing to our planet. Lewis Dartnell turns the tables in his book Origins. He asks how Earth has affected us, through our long evolution to big brains, small jaws and scrawny bodies that somehow cooperate with each other enough to make us the planet’s dominant eukaryotic species. All this began, Dartnell argues, with the tectonic processes that created the East African Rift — the area that today runs from Somalia and Ethiopia down to the coast of Mozambique.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by darvinhg
    +20 +1

    Genetic Mutations In Our Bodies Might Be Less Random Than We Thought, Scientists Say

    When it comes to evolution in humans, there are two main things making it happen, at least on the genetic level: The recombination of genes that happens when our parents’ chromosomes pair up and the random mutations that inevitably result. A new high-resolution map of the human genome is providing scientists with their most detailed look yet at the dual roles those processes play in creating each person’s unique genome. It’s also revealing that mutations in some places are more likely than others, indicating, the researchers say, that they might not be as random as we think.

  • Analysis
    1 month ago
    by kxh
    +12 +1

    Life quickly finds a way: the surprisingly swift end to evolution's big bang

    Modern animals took over our planet much more quickly than previously thought. This has both welcome and disturbing implications for the future of life on our rapidly changing planet

  • Analysis
    5 years ago
    by drunkenninja
    +8 +2

    Why greed may offer an evolutionary advantage

    Religion and science have long had disagreements — from Galileo, who was tried for teaching that the Earth was not the center of the universe, to battles over teaching evolution in public schools. But when it comes to greed, religion and science share this view: It is not good for you.

  • Analysis
    5 years ago
    by socialiguana
    +5 +1

    'Evolution will punish you if you're selfish and mean'

    Two Michigan State University evolutionary biologists offer new evidence that evolution doesn’t favor the selfish, disproving a theory popularized in 2012. “We found evolution will punish you if you’re selfish and mean,” said lead author Christoph Adami, MSU professor of microbiology and molecular genetics. “For a short time and against a specific set of opponents, some selfish organisms may come out ahead. But selfishness isn’t evolutionarily sustainable.”

  • Analysis
    5 years ago
    by wildcard
    +9 +1

    This amazing fruit fly evolved to have pictures of ants on its wings

    This is unbelievable, but the fruit fly G tridens has somehow evolved to have what looks like pictures of ants on its wings. Seriously, its transparent wings have an ant design on them complete with "six legs, two antennae, a head, thorax and tapered abdomen." It's nature's evolutionary art painted on a fly's wings.

  • Analysis
    5 years ago
    by canuck
    +11 +5

    Did Iconic Archaeopteryx Lose Its Ability to Fly?

    Although it has long been debated whether the proto-bird Archaeopteryx was able to actually fly or merely evolving toward that ability, to date nobody had yet seriously suggested that it could have been instead in the midst of losing its ability to fly. But that is precisely what Michael Habib, a biologist at the University of Southern California proposed last week to a packed hall at the annual meeting of the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology in Los Angeles.

  • Analysis
    5 years ago
    by shabriprayogi
    +11 +1

    8 Incredible Facts You May Not Know About Human Evolution

    Homo sapiens evolved about 200-150,000 years ago in Africa, but our story as a species stretches back much further than that with early human ancestors. And the evolution of Homo sapiens is itself a tangled tale, full of unanswered questions and gothic family melodrama. Here are a few facts you may not know about the human evolutionary story.

  • Analysis
    5 years ago
    by KondoR
    +9 +1

    The evolution of beauty - Face the facts

    What makes for a beautiful visage, and why, may have been discovered accidentally on a Russian fur farm