LOUNGE all new asksnapzu ideasforsnapzu newtribes interesting pics videos funny technology science technews gaming health history worldnews business web research entertainment food living internet socialmedia mobile space sports photography nature animals movies culture travel television finance music celebrities gadgets environment usa crime politics law money justice psychology security cars wtf art google books lifetips bigbrother women apple kids recipes whoa military privacy education facebook medicine computing wildlife design war drugs middleeast diet toplists economy fail violence humor africa microsoft parenting dogs canada neuroscience architecture religion advertising infographics sex journalism disaster software aviation relationships energy booze life japan ukraine newmovies nsa cannabis name Name of the tribe humanrights nasa cute weather gifs discoveries cops futurism football earth dataviz pets guns entrepreneurship fitness android extremeweather fashion insects india northamerica
Submit a link
Start a discussion
  • Analysis
    10 days ago
    by Gozzin
    +20 +5

    'A vegan diet won't help cure cancer': Doctors warn against 'bogus' medical claims

    But the Irish Society of Medical Oncologists (ISMO) said there was no “magic diet” to help patients beat cancer – and this meant following their doctor’s advice and following a high protein, high calorie diet.

  • Current Event
    3 weeks ago
    by canuck
    +14 +3

    From palliative care to complete remission, Lauren says world-leading cancer therapy saved her life

    A form of cancer treatment Lauren Krelsham credits with giving her another chance to live will be made more widely available, with the Federal Government announcing $80 million towards a facility in Melbourne. The $105 million treatment centre will be housed at the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre and will offer CAR T-cell therapy, Health Minister Greg Hunt said. The treatment involves removing some of a patient's immune system cells so they can be re-engineered in a lab, before they are reinserted to attack cancer cells.

  • Analysis
    10 days ago
    by Gozzin
    +15 +1

    What's behind the increase in bowel cancer among younger Australians?

    The rise in obesity parallels the increase in bowel cancer. Highly processed foods and alcohol could also play a role.

  • Analysis
    10 days ago
    by Gozzin
    +4 +1

    IBD increases prostate cancer risk by fivefold

    According to a new study, inflammatory bowel disease increases the risk of developing prostate cancer. This finding opens up a challenging clinical debate.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by chunkymonkey
    +17 +4

    Woman with cancer awarded $29M in Johnson and Johnson talcum powder suit

    The plaintiff alleged that Johnson & Johnson's baby powder caused her mesothelioma, a form of cancer linked to asbestos exposure.

  • Current Event
    2 weeks ago
    by zritic
    +4 +1

    A 21-month-old beat stage 4 cancer after more than a year of grueling treatments

    With five rounds of chemotherapy, two stem cell transplants and a dozen rounds of radiation, a toddler from Kentucky has faced an extremely difficult first few months of life. But things are finally starting to look up for 21-month-old Molly Hughes, who was diagnosed with stage 4 cancer in 2017.

  • Current Event
    12 days ago
    by socialiguana
    +14 +1

    Wearable Device Scrubs Cancer Cells from Blood

    A new wearable device, tested on animals, can capture and remove tumor cells circulating in the bloodstream. With further development, the blood-filtering gadget could be used to diagnose, and perhaps treat, metastatic cancer in humans. Inventors of the microfluidic device, at the University of Michigan, described it last week in the journal Nature Communications.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by canuck
    +20 +5

    A cure for cancer? Israeli scientists say they think they found one

    A small team of Israeli scientists think they might have found the first complete cure for cancer. “We believe we will offer in a year’s time a complete cure for cancer,” said Dan Aridor, of a new treatment being developed by his company, Accelerated Evolution Biotechnologies Ltd. (AEBi), which was founded in 2000 in the ITEK incubator in the Weizmann Science Park. AEBi developed the SoAP platform, which provides functional leads to very difficult targets.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by bradd
    +16 +5

    Rogue stem cell may trigger every type of cancer, research suggests

    All cancers may be triggered by a rare rogue stem cell that has learned how to cheat death, according to new research. Scientists believe the discovery of the “cell of origin” could be a turning point in the battle against the disease. Lead researcher Professor Michael Lisanti, chair of translational medicine at University of Salford, said: “If, as we believe, we have found the beginning of the road, we may have to press the reset button on how we treat cancer with drugs.”

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by doodlegirl
    +24 +3

    Could we soon be able to detect cancer in 10 minutes?

    About seven years ago, researchers at the US DNA sequencing company Illumina started to notice something odd. A new blood test it ran on 125,000 expectant mothers looking for genetic abnormalities such as Down’s syndrome in their foetuses returned some extremely unexpected signals in 10 cases. Chillingly, it dawned on them that the abnormal DNA they were seeing wasn’t from the foetuses but was, rather, undiagnosed cancer in the mothers.

  • Analysis
    3 weeks ago
    by doodlegirl
    +23 +1

    New drugs that unleash the immune system on cancers may backfire, fueling tumor growth

    Although the 65-year-old woman had a rare type of endometrial cancer that had spread to her liver and was expected to be fatal, she still felt well enough to work and swim. As a last hope, her doctors gave her a type of immune-stimulating drug that had had near-miraculous results in some patients with advanced cancer. But 3 weeks after she began the drug, the woman's liver tumors had grown, and her abdomen was swollen with tumors as big as oranges.

  • Current Event
    6 months ago
    by cone
    +14 +3

    Contraceptive pill linked with reduced risk of ovarian cancer

    Women who use modern forms of the combined pill are at a lower risk of developing ovarian cancer than women who don’t take hormonal contraception, research suggests. The study backs up previous findings for older forms of the combined pill – an oral contraceptive that contains artificial versions of both oestrogen and progesterone. Modern forms of the pill contain different doses of synthetic oestrogen and different types of progestins, and are sometimes taken continuously.

  • Analysis
    6 months ago
    by grandtheftsoul
    +34 +7

    The DNA detectives hunting the causes of cancer

    To find out why cancer rates vary across the world, scientists are searching for the genomic fingerprints left by different causes of cancer.

  • Current Event
    6 months ago
    by TNY
    +10 +4

    3-year-old cancer survivor serves as flower girl in her bone marrow donor’s wedding

    Last month, Skye Savren-McCormick got to be the flower girl in a wedding. To prepare, she practiced walking with a little basket in her living room. Even so, on the day of the wedding the 3-year-old still took a big fistful of petals and dropped them on the ground before taking her first step down the aisle. And the wedding guests could barely hold it together.

  • Analysis
    5 months ago
    by CatLady
    +13 +3

    Half-life

    Chad Walde believed in his work at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Then he got a rare brain cancer linked to radiation, and the government denied it had any responsibility.

  • Analysis
    4 months ago
    by zyery
    +45 +8

    The weedkiller in our food is killing us

    On a recent Saturday afternoon, in an estuary near Tampa Bay, Florida, I watched airboats move up and down the river banks, spraying massive plumes of weedkiller on to the vegetation. The state of Florida was trying to control and kill off scores of plant species. Nearby, children were lying out in the sun, though they knew better than to swim in the water, which has recently been blooming with toxic algae. Mists of weedkiller drifted downwind toward them.

  • Current Event
    4 months ago
    by darvinhg
    +22 +4

    Research identifies new therapeutic target for cancer treatment and tissue regeneration

    Research led by the University of Plymouth and Technische Universität Dresden has identified a new therapeutic target for cancer treatment and tissue regeneration - a protein called Prominin-1. Dr Bing Hu from Plymouth's Institute of Translational and Stratified Medicine (ITSMed) together with Dr Denis Corbeil from the Technische Universität Dresden and a multinational team has shown how Prominin-1 (also known as CD133) plays a significant role in ensuring stem cells respond to extracellular signals.

  • Current Event
    4 months ago
    by TheSpirit
    +18 +4

    A deeper understanding of chromosome capping could improve therapies for both cancer and aging

    Switching off the enzyme that adds protective caps to chromosome ends could help fight many types of cancer, A*STAR researchers have shown. The team demonstrated the treatment's potential by using it to thwart tumor growth in mice. The zipper style of DNA replication means that the tips of chromosomes cannot be copied, leaving them slightly shorter with each cell division. To prevent loss of genetic information, chromosome ends are protected by caps called telomeres—repetitive, gene-free regions (see image).

  • Current Event
    4 months ago
    by socialiguana
    +19 +3

    Breast cancer survivor shares topless picture after ignorant comments

    A woman who beat cancer hit back at men who made cruel comments about her appearance - by sharing a picture of her mastectomy scars. Laura Owens, from Formby, was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2012, when she was just 31. She had her right breast removed and reconstructed in that year, before deciding to have the other breast removed and reconstructed in 2014.

  • Current Event
    3 months ago
    by zobo
    +18 +4

    Australian researchers develop 10-minute cancer test

    Researchers in Australia have developed a 10-minute test that can detect the presence of cancer cells anywhere in the human body, according to a newly published study. The test was developed after researchers from the University of Queensland found that cancer forms a unique DNA structure when placed in water. The test works by identifying the presence of that structure, a discovery that could help detect cancer in humans far earlier than current methods, according to the paper published in journal Nature Communications.

  • Current Event
    3 months ago
    by TheSpirit
    +17 +5

    Hopes of melanoma breakthrough from cells that 'put cancer to sleep'

    They fight viruses and bacteria in our skin, brain, lungs and gut. Now Australian scientists have also discovered that these special immune cells have the power to put melanoma tumours ‘‘to sleep’’, potentially paving the way for new treatments. It has previously been known that tissue-resident memory T cells help fight cancer, but until now researchers have not understood how they do so.

  • Current Event
    3 months ago
    by spacepopper
    +18 +2

    Pancreatic Cancer Immune Checkpoint Target Identified

    While current immune checkpoint inhibitor therapies are largely ineffective against pancreatic cancer, scientists in the U.S. have now identified an immune checkpoint molecule that could represent a promising immunotherapeutic target for this tumor type. The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center-led team found that V-domain immunoglobulin suppressor of T cell activation (VISTA) is preferentially expressed at high levels in pancreatic cancer, when compared with melanoma tumors.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by geoleo
    +11 +1

    New Precision Medicine Procedure Fights Cancer, Advances Treatment for Pets and Humans

    MU veterinary oncologists develop a vaccine treatment for osteosarcoma, a common type of bone cancer in dogs, avoiding chemotherapy and opening the door for human clinical trials. In a first-of-its-kind study, scientists at the University of Missouri have helped advance a patient-specific, precision medicine treatment for bone cancer in dogs.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by Nelson
    +3 +1

    Prostate Cancer Prediction Looks to Machine Learning for Accuracy Boost

    Diagnosing prostate cancer (PCa) has continually faced hurdles that have been difficult to overcome. The current diagnostic standard, the prostate-specific antigen or PSA test, has many limitations—as Richard J. Ablin, PhD, discoverer of PSA in 1970, has vociferously argued on countless occasions. Yet, with such limited diagnostic options and the speed at which PCa can metastasize and become deadly, the devil you know is better than the devil you don’t.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by geoleo
    +19 +1

    Scientists Make Breakthrough In Advanced Kidney Cancer Treatment

    Scientists at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute have made what can be considered a breakthrough in advanced kidney cancer treatment. According to the American Cancer Society, kidney cancer is among the 10 most common cancers in the country. For women, the lifetime risk of developing kidney cancer is one in 83, and for men one in 58. According to the organization’s estimates, more than 70,000 new kidney cancer cases will occur in 2019, and nearly 15,000 people will die from this disease within a year.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by capoti
    +1 +1

    Lab-on-a-chip detects cancer from speck of blood

    A new ultrasensitive diagnostic device invented by researchers at the University of Kansas, The University of Kansas Cancer Center and KU Medical Center could allow doctors to detect cancer quickly from a droplet of blood or plasma, leading to timelier interventions and better outcomes for patients.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by geoleo
    +3 +1

    Alex Trebek Reveals He’s Been Diagnosed With Stage 4 Pancreatic Cancer

    Alex Trebek has been diagnosed with stage four pancreatic cancer, he revealed on Wednesday. The 78-year-old Jeopardy! host announced the sad news on the show's YouTube page. "Normally the prognosis for this is not very encouraging, but I'm going to fight this, and I'm going to keep working," Trebek says. "And with the love and support from my family and friends, and with the help of your prayers also, I plan to beat the low survival rates statistics for this disease."

  • Analysis
    5 years ago
    by chunkymonkey
    +16 +2

    Baby Pics Can Diagnose Deadly Cancer

    Like most parents, Bryan Shaw snapped unending pictures of his new son Noah. But when the baby was just a few months old, Shaw’s wife Elizabeth started to notice something odd about the pictures: in them, one of Noah’s eyes appeared milky-white instead of red.

  • Analysis
    5 years ago
    by drummer
    +11 +1

    Cancer research of mice and men

    Experiments on mice are widely used to help determine which new cancer therapies stand a good chance of working in human patients. Such studies are not perfect and, all too often, what works in a rodent produces little or no benefit in people. This has led researchers to explore the ways in which mice and men are dissimilar, in order to pick apart why the responses are different. A new study now proposes that the temperature in which lab mice are kept is one thing that does matter.

  • Analysis
    5 years ago
    by socialiguana
    +18 +1

    Curry Compound Kills Cancer Cells

    Scientists have found a very unusual potential cancer-fighting technique: nanoparticles that carry curry into cancer cells. Specifically the particles were filled with curcumin, a compound found in curry. The research by scientists from the University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences in Austria was published in the Journal of Nanobiotechnology on Dec. 6.

  • Current Event
    5 years ago
    by jayhallny
    +10 +1

    Killing cancer like the common cold

    Nick Wilkins was diagnosed with leukemia when he was 4 years old, and when the cancer kept bouncing back, impervious to all the different treatments the doctors tried, his father sat him down for a talk. John Wilkins explained to Nick, who was by then 14, that doctors had tried chemotherapy, radiation, even a bone marrow transplant from his sister.

  • Analysis
    5 years ago
    by cone
    +13 +1

    Gene Therapy Killing Cancer

    Gene therapy has just begun to set the health-world abuzz with some of its most recent successes. Patients with leukemia and other blood cancers are seeing unprecedented results with these new treatments, sending some into full remission by attacking and killing the highly fatal diseases.

  • Current Event
    5 years ago
    by canuck
    +14 +1

    See warmhearted husband travel the world in pink tutu to cheer up cancer-stricken wife

    Ballerina Bob has taken hundreds of photos of himself in a frilly tutu - all because he wants to make his poorly wife laugh

  • Expression
    5 years ago
    by TNY
    +13 +1

    What Bill Keller Doesn’t Get: There Is No Right Way to Die

    Bill Keller’s op-ed for the New York Times about the most respectable way to die from cancer could be the subject of 100 great lessons in how not to write about human beings. Keller contrasts the case of his father-in-law, who died at age 79 with a stiff upper lip, with that of Lisa Boncheck Adams, a fortysomething mother of three with breast cancer, who has been blogging and tweeting about her treatment and experience with the disease for years.

  • Video/Audio
    5 years ago
    by drank
    +22 +1

    Surgeon general links colon cancer, diabetes to smoking

    Fifty years ago, smoking was linked to cancer in the first surgeon general's report on tobacco. On Friday, Dr. Boris Lushniak, the acting surgeon general, issued the 32nd report on tobacco, saying "enough is enough." His goal: eliminating the use of cigarettes and tobacco.