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  • Current Event
    4 days ago
    by ilyas
    +12 +3

    One of the oldest stars in the universe found

    One of the oldest stars in the universe is quietly hiding out in the Milky Way some 2,000 light-years from Earth. According to a new study published in The Astrophysical Journal, the tiny, 13.5-billion-year-old red dwarf contains barely any heavy elements at all, suggesting it formed out of a nearly pristine cloud of material leftover from shortly after the Big Bang. Furthermore, because the small star is just one-seventh the mass of the Sun and is made of primordial matter, it’s making astronomers reconsider the demographics of the very first stars.

  • Current Event
    6 days ago
    by spacepopper
    +20 +6

    Data details dynamically driven double-degenerate double-detonation supernova theory

    The identification of three white dwarf stars zooming at hyper-fast velocities might provide evidence to support an alternative theory explaining the formation of Type 1a supernovae, researchers say. Type 1a supernovae, orthodoxy holds, arise when two white dwarf stars locked in a binary orbit merge with each other, kick-starting a runaway nuclear fusion reaction and consequent massive explosion.

  • Current Event
    2 days ago
    by yuriburi
    +2 +1

    Ancient Star Found that's Only Slightly Younger than the Universe Itself

    According to the most widely-accepted cosmological theory, the first stars in our Universe formed roughly 150 to 1 billion years after the Big Bang. Over time, these stars began to come together to form globular clusters, which slowly coalesced to form the first galaxies – including our very own Milky Way. For some time, astronomers have held that this process began for our galaxy some 13.51 billion years ago.

  • Analysis
    12 days ago
    by everlost
    +24 +3

    Just how massive is the Milky Way?

    A first of its kind study uses angular momentum of satellite galaxies to weigh the Milky Way, providing a testing ground for the widely theorized cold dark matter theory.

  • Analysis
    3 weeks ago
    by spacepopper
    +14 +3

    Are Black Holes Actually Dark Energy Stars?

    George Chapline believes that the Event Horizon Telescope will offer evidence that black holes are really dark energy stars.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by funhonestdude
    +29 +7

    Cosmic 'hotspots' may be evidence of a universe that existed before ours

    Scientists agree that the story of the universe began 13.8 billion years ago, when everything — all the matter and energy and even space itself — emerged from the extraordinarily hot, dense cauldron known as the Big Bang. But ask a scientist what came before that first moment, and you’re likely to get a shrug. To many, thinking about a time before the beginning of time makes no sense.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by jedlicka
    +17 +5

    Black holes ruled out as universe’s missing dark matter

    For one brief shining moment after the 2015 detection of gravitational waves from colliding black holes, astronomers held out hope that the universe’s mysterious dark matter might consist of a plenitude of black holes sprinkled throughout the universe. UC Berkeley physicists have dashed those hopes.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by LisMan
    +17 +3

    The Telescope With a 119-Ton Mirror That Will Revolutionize Astronomy

    To be housed in a building 22 stories high, on a plateau of the Atacama Desert of Chile, the Giant Magellan Telescope will be the largest optical telescope ever built.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by geoleo
    +15 +3

    Powerful jets found shooting from neutron star with incredible magnet

    For the first time, astronomers have witnessed a fast-moving jet of material shooting outward from a neutron star with an extremely powerful magnetic field — one that is some 10 trillion times stronger than the Sun's. The surprising discovery not only caught researchers off guard, but is also forcing them to fundamentally rethink their current theories regarding how jets form throughout the cosmos.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by roxxy
    +14 +3

    Scientists Pinpoint Where Dark Matter Is Hiding in the Universe

    There's a huge amount of matter in the universe that we can't directly see. But scientists can tell it's there. They call it dark matter. They know it's there because its gravity tugs on the stars and galaxies around it, altering their movement. Dark matter also tugs on light as it passes, bending its path, a phenomenon called gravitational lensing. And now, by studying where that lensing appears in the sky, an international team of scientists have released a detailed, 3D map[BI1] of dark matter.

  • Analysis
    8 months ago
    by iamsanchez
    +28 +5

    Measuring growth of the universe reveals a mystery

    A new measurement of how fast the universe is expanding reveals an odd gap.

  • Current Event
    8 months ago
    by funhonestdude
    +16 +7

    Hubble Just Found a "Relic Galaxy" and It's Absolutely Stunning

    NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope has uncovered a strange kind of galaxy surprisingly close to home. A new study published Monday in Nature reports that Hubble scientists have found a “relic galaxy” called NGC 1277 about 240 million light-years away near the Perseus cluster. The galaxy is only a quarter the size of the Milky Way, but in its early days, scientists think NGC 1277 could crank out stars about 1,000 times faster than our own galaxy.

  • Analysis
    7 months ago
    by bkool
    +42 +13

    Stephen Hawking leaves behind 'breathtaking' final multiverse theory

    A final theory explaining how mankind might detect parallel universes was completed by Stephen Hawking shortly before he died, it has emerged.

  • Current Event
    7 months ago
    by 8mm
    +28 +7

    A Mathematical Proof That The Universe Could Have Formed Spontaneously From Nothing

    One of the great theories of modern cosmology is that the universe began in a Big Bang. This is not just an idea but a scientific theory backed up by numerous lines of evidence. For a start, there is the cosmic microwave background, which is a kind of echo of the big bang; then there is the ongoing expansion of the cosmos, which when imagined backwards, hints at a Big Bang-type origin; and the abundance of the primordial elements, such as helium-4, helium-3, deuterium and so on, can all be calculated using the theory.

  • Current Event
    7 months ago
    by ckshenn
    +20 +4

    Hubble images farthest star ever seen

    In a study published today in Nature Astronomy, an international team of researchers announced the discovery of the most distant star ever observed. The team detected the blue supergiant star — which shone when the universe was just one-third its current age — with the help of both the Hubble Space Telescope and an observational phenomenon known as gravitational lensing.

  • Video/Audio
    7 months ago
    by jcscher
    +26 +5

    Detecting the Undetectable

    Researchers from around the globe are on the hunt for elusive dark matter particles by building the world's most sensitive detector.

  • Current Event
    6 months ago
    by hxxp
    +18 +3

    Professor Stephen Hawking's final theory: The universe is a hologram

    Stephen Hawking has revealed from beyond the grave his final scientific theory - that the universe is a hologram. The cosmologist, who died on March 14, has challenged previous theories of cosmic "inflation" and the "multiverse" in a new paper published in the Journal Of High Energy Physics. Scientists generally believe that for a tiny fraction of a second after the Big Bang, the universe expanded incredibly rapidly before settling into its present state, filled with stars and galaxies - the inflation theory.

  • Current Event
    5 months ago
    by robmonk
    +30 +5

    Astronomers Discover Monster Black Hole the Size of 20 Billion Suns

    Astronomers using cutting-edge skywatching devices have identified an extremely fast-growing black hole, cataloging it as a ‘monster’ that eats the mass equivalent of our sun every two days.

  • Analysis
    5 months ago
    by kxh
    +27 +3

    A Physicist Has Proposed a Grim Explanation For Why We Never See Aliens

    The Universe is so unimaginably big, and it's positively teeming with an almost infinite supply of potentially life-giving worlds. So where the heck is everybody?

  • Current Event
    5 months ago
    by rhingo
    +15 +5

    Astronomers catch a black hole devouring a star

    Astronomers Seppo Mattila and Miguel Pérez-Torres usually study the natural deaths of stars, but they weren’t going to pass up the chance to investigate a stellar murder. A new paper in Science describes how they nabbed photographic evidence that a supermassive black hole in a relatively nearby galaxy tore apart and consumed part of a star in a phenomenon called a tidal disruption event (TDE), spewing jets of material in the process. Scientists have observed these cosmic crime scenes before, but this was the first time anyone managed to get such detailed images of the jets and their changing structure over time.

  • Expression
    4 months ago
    by drunkenninja
    +11 +3

    We Are Most Likely Alone in the Universe

    "Where are they?" famously asked Italian physicist Enrico Fermi in the 1950s. By "they," he meant space aliens. Fermi figured that if the galaxy contained space-faring civilizations it would only take them a few tens of millions of years to populate it. So why hasn't there been a saucer-landing-take-me-to-your leader moment already? This is the Fermi Paradox.

  • Expression
    4 months ago
    by drunkenninja
    +31 +7

    The tools humanity will need for living in the year 1 trillion

    Since the 1990s, astrophysicists have known that for the past few billion years, the Universe has been experiencing an accelerated rate of expansion. This gave rise to the theory that the Universe is permeated by a mysterious invisible energy known as "dark energy", which acts against gravity and is pushing the cosmos apart. In time, this energy will become the dominant force in the Universe, causing all stars and galaxies to spread beyond the cosmic horizon.

  • Analysis
    3 months ago
    by aj0690
    +28 +7

    Timeline of the far future

    While predictions of the future can never be absolutely certain, present understanding in various scientific fields allows for the prediction of far-future events, if only in the broadest outline. These fields include astrophysics, which has revealed how planets and stars form, interact, and die; particle physics, which has revealed how matter behaves at the smallest scales; evolutionary biology, which predicts how life will evolve over time; and plate tectonics, which shows how continents shift over millennia.

  • Current Event
    3 months ago
    by larylin
    +9 +2

    Andromeda likely consumed the Milky Way’s long-lost sibling

    The Andromeda Galaxy (M31) is the largest member of the Milky Way’s gang of galactic neighbors, known as the Local Group. With around a trillion suns worth of mass, Andromeda’s gravitational influence is a force to be reckoned with. And according to new research, no galaxy in the Local Group knows this better than M32, an oddball satellite galaxy now orbiting Andromeda.

  • Analysis
    3 months ago
    by zritic
    +11 +2

    A star orbiting a black hole shows Einstein got gravity right — again

    A single star, careening around the monster black hole in the center of the Milky Way, has provided astronomers with new proof that Albert Einstein was right about gravity. More than 100 years ago, Einstein’s general theory of relativity revealed that gravity is the result of matter curving the fabric of spacetime (SN: 10/17/15, p. 16). Now, in a paper published July 26 in Astronomy & Astrophysics, a team of researchers reports the observation of a hallmark of general relativity known as gravitational redshift.

  • Current Event
    3 months ago
    by sjvn
    +17 +3

    Supermassive Black Hole Caught Sucking Energy From Nearby Starlight

    Astronomy.com is for anyone who wants to learn more about astronomy events, cosmology, planets, galaxies, asteroids, astrophotography, the Big Bang, black holes, comets, constellations, eclipses, exoplanets, nebulae, meteors, quasars, observing, telescopes, NASA, Hubble, space missions, stargazing, and more

  • Current Event
    3 months ago
    by messi
    +14 +4

    Canada’s new radio telescope just picked up a strange signal from deep space

    Canada’s shiny new radio telescope is up and running, and it just heard something very, very odd coming from deep space. The Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME for short) is located in British Columbia, and it spends its time listening intently for signals beaming through the vacuum of space. Most of the time, radio telescopes like this don’t hear anything out of the ordinary...

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by robmonk
    +16 +2

    Early Opaque Universe Linked to Galaxy Scarcity

    A team of astronomers led by George Becker at the University of California, Riverside, has made a surprising discovery: 12.5 billion years ago, the most opaque place in the universe contained relatively little matter. It has long been known that the universe is filled with a web-like network of dark matter and gas. This “cosmic web” accounts for most of the matter in the universe, whereas galaxies like our own Milky Way make up only a small fraction.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by wildcat
    +14 +4

    A $1 billion telescope that will take pictures 10 times sharper than Hubble's is now officially under construction

    In astronomy, cutting-edge technology often begins with a bunch of bulldozers, busted rocks, and dump trucks. So it goes with the Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT), which will the world's largest and most powerful when it sees "first light" in 2024. Astronomers hope to use the huge observatory to study the ancient universe and look for signs of alien life. Construction crews atop a Chilean mountain range broke ground for the $1 billion project on Tuesday.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by TNY
    +15 +3

    Hubble just took a brand new photo that will make you feel completely insignificant

    We all might be anxiously awaiting the eventual launch of NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope — which has been stuck in an endless series of delays thanks to the idiots at Northrop Grumman — but the trusty Hubble is still delivering some pretty fantastic views of the heavens. The telescope’s latest snapshot is a real doozy, and it’s going to make you feel like you barely even exist.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by TNY
    +18 +3

    A galaxy 11.3 billion light-years away appears filled with dark matter

    A distant galaxy appears filled with dark matter. The outermost stars in the Cosmic Seagull, a galaxy 11.3 billion light-years away, race too fast to be propelled by the gravity of the galaxy’s gas and stars alone. Instead, they move as if urged on by an invisible force, indicating the hidden presence of dark matter, astrophysicist Verónica Motta of the University of Valparaíso in Chile and her colleagues report August 8 at arXiv.org.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by 8mm
    +11 +2

    'Ghost' black hole: Scientists claim to have found evidence of another universe

    Scientists have found that the universe we live in is not the first one to ever exist. A group of leading physicists have found that eons ago, other universes existed and they had black holes, just like the current universe, the Daily Mail reported. They say that cosmic microwave background radiation (CMB) – the same thing that causes white noise on TVs – is evidence of the remnants of these blackholes.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by geoleo
    +13 +2

    Galaxy Punches Through Neighbor to Spawn Giant Ring of Black Holes

    A giant ring of black holes has been discovered 300 million light-years away, offering new clues about what happens when galaxies collide. Using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, astronomers detected a very bright source of X-rays that is likely fueled by either a ring of stellar-mass black holes or neutron stars — the small, dense corpses left after stellar explosions, — according to a new study.

  • Analysis
    1 month ago
    by ticktack
    +14 +1

    Simulation shows nuclear pasta 10 billion times harder to break than steel

    A trio of researchers affiliated with several institutions in the U.S. and Canada has found evidence that suggests nuclear material beneath the surface of neutron stars may be the strongest material in the universe. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, M. E. Caplan, A. S. Schneider, and C. J. Horowitz describe their neutron star simulation and what it showed.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by ppp
    +2 +1

    Matter clocked speeding toward a black hole at 30 percent the speed o

    After falling past the event horizon — the point of no return — nothing can escape a black hole. While the depths of black holes may forever remain a mystery, astronomers can observe the regions around them. In a paper published September 3 in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, a team of researchers reported, for the first time, spotting a clump of matter falling directly into a distant black hole at nearly one-third the speed of light.