LOUNGE all new asksnapzu ideasforsnapzu newtribes interesting pics videos funny technology science technews gaming health history worldnews business web research entertainment food living internet socialmedia mobile space sports photography nature animals movies culture travel television finance music celebrities gadgets environment usa crime politics law money justice psychology security cars wtf art google books lifetips bigbrother women apple kids recipes whoa military privacy education facebook medicine computing wildlife design war drugs middleeast diet toplists economy fail violence humor africa microsoft parenting dogs canada neuroscience architecture religion advertising infographics sex journalism disaster software aviation relationships energy booze life japan ukraine newmovies nsa cannabis name Name of the tribe humanrights nasa cute weather gifs discoveries cops futurism football earth dataviz pets guns entrepreneurship fitness android extremeweather fashion insects india northamerica
Submit a link
Start a discussion
  • Current Event
    3 hours ago
    by socialiguana
    +2 +1

    ‘We can’t go back to normal’: how will coronavirus change the world?

    Everything feels new, unbelievable, overwhelming. At the same time, it feels as if we’ve walked into an old recurring dream. In a way, we have. We’ve seen it before, on TV and in blockbusters. We knew roughly what it would be like, and somehow this makes the encounter not less strange, but more so.

  • Current Event
    8 hours ago
    by ubthejudge
    +3 +1

    Antarctica has just had its first recorded heatwave

    While the world rightfully focuses on the COVID-19 pandemic, the planet is still warming. This summer's Antarctic weather, as elsewhere in the world, was unprecedented in the observed record.

  • Expression
    1 day ago
    by wildcat
    +7 +1

    Designing an end to a toxic American obsession: The Lawn

    Lawns have proliferated since the rise of the suburbs in the mid-20th century. But their maintenance produces greenhouses gases and they are biodiversity deserts. Shifting attitudes to lawn care offers a giant eco opportunity. The question is, how?

  • Current Event
    1 day ago
    by junglman
    +8 +1

    What the Coronavirus Curve Teaches Us About Climate Change

    The coronavirus pandemic—sadly—has introduced or reintroduced many people to the concept of an exponential curve, in which a quantity grows at an increasing rate over time, as the number of people contracting the virus currently is doing. It is this curve that so many of us are trying to “flatten” through social distancing and other mitigating measures, small and large.

  • Current Event
    5 days ago
    by mariogi
    +23 +3

    Why a Plague of Locusts is Threatening Crops in Africa and Beyond

    Over the past few months, massive swarms of locusts, one of which occupied an area more than three times the size of New York City, have devoured crops across the Horn of Africa and the Middle East, leaving an estimated 20 million people at risk of famine. The first generation’s eggs are starting to hatch, and now even bigger swarms are forming, threatening countries from the Democratic Republic of Congo to Yemen, Iran, Pakistan and India, “representing an unprecedented threat to food security and livelihoods,” says the U.N.’s Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO).

  • Current Event
    10 days ago
    by larylin
    +21 +4

    We Must Respond to Climate Change Like We're Responding to Coronavirus

    You know that gnawing feeling of “oh, God, we’re in the midst of something horrible” you have because of the coronavirus? Are you looking around at this crisis sweeping across the world and feeling helpless because you have limited power to stop it?

  • Current Event
    12 days ago
    by Pfennig88
    +22 +6

    Greenland's melting ice raised global sea level by 2.2mm in two months

    Last year’s summer was so warm that it helped trigger the loss of 600bn tons of ice from Greenland – enough to raise global sea levels by 2.2mm in just two months, new research has found. The analysis of satellite data has revealed the astounding loss of ice in just a few months of abnormally high temperatures around the northern pole. Last year was the hottest on record for the Arctic, with the annual minimum extent of sea ice in the region its second-lowest on record.

  • Current Event
    11 days ago
    by spacepopper
    +23 +3

    Ice loss in Antarctica and Greenland increased sixfold in the last 30 years

    Antarctica and Greenland are losing ice six times faster than in the 1990s, a pair of studies in the journal Nature show. According to the international team of climatologists behind the research, the unprecedented rate of melt has already contributed 0.7 inches (1.78 centimeters) to global sea level rise in the last three decades, putting the planet on track for the worst-case climate warming scenario laid out in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's (IPCC) latest report.

  • Current Event
    2 weeks ago
    by baron778
    +26 +2

    'The rich are to blame for climate change'

    The rich are primarily to blame for the global climate crisis, a study by the University of Leeds of 86 countries claims. The wealthiest tenth of people consume about 20 times more energy overall than the bottom ten, wherever they live. The gulf is greatest in transport, where the top tenth gobble 187 times more fuel than the poorest tenth, the research says.

  • Current Event
    9 days ago
    by zobo
    +3 +1

    In Just 10 Years, Warming Has Increased the Odds of Disasters

    Small levels of global warming can increase the likelihood of extreme events, new research warns. That’s prompting scientists to question how accurately disasters in the recent past can be used to predict extreme events today.A study published Wednesday in Science Advances suggests that some research attributing climate change to individual disasters has underestimated the probability of certain extremes in the last decade. That’s especially true of unprecedented hot and wet events.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by jackthetripper
    +19 +7

    Saving the banana

    Scientists around the world are working on ways to stop banana crops being wiped out by a new strain of Panama disease. The disease, which has so far affected farms on four continents, reaches the banana plants through infected soil. Cleaning the soil is almost impossible. One idea under development in the Netherlands is to take away the soil altogether and replace it with something produced in a factory - such as loft insulation.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by geoleo
    +16 +4

    Microplastics on Snowdon a 'scary wake-up call'

    The discovery of microplastic pollution near the top of the highest mountain in Wales is a "scary wake-up call", environmentalists have said. Traces of plastic have been found in samples collected from Llyn Glaslyn - a remote lake near the summit of Snowdon. The tiny particles are "most likely" to have been deposited by rain, wetland science expert Dr Christian Dunn said.

  • Current Event
    3 weeks ago
    by zritic
    +37 +5

    Nearly All Coral Reefs Will Disappear Over The Next 20 Years, Scientists Say

    Over the next 20 years, scientists estimate about 70 to 90% of all coral reefs will disappear primarily as a result of warming ocean waters, ocean acidity, and pollution. Expand that out to 2100 and it’s “looking quite grim,” says Renee Setter, a marine scientist at the University of Hawaii in Manoa. By 2100 there will be nearly zero suitable coral habitats remaining, eliminating nearly all living coral reef habitats.

  • Current Event
    3 weeks ago
    by belangermira
    +15 +4

    Tropical forests losing their ability to absorb carbon, study finds

    Tropical forests are taking up less carbon dioxide from the air, reducing their ability to act as “carbon sinks” and bringing closer the prospect of accelerating climate breakdown. The Amazon could turn into a source of carbon in the atmosphere, instead of one of the biggest absorbers of the gas, as soon as the next decade, owing to the damage caused by loggers and farming interests and the impacts of the climate crisis, new research has found.

  • Current Event
    3 weeks ago
    by larylin
    +16 +3

    Why we need to kill the lawn

    There are, by some estimates, more than 40 million acres of green lawns in the U.S., making turf grass the largest irrigated crop in the country. A new book suggests that landowners repurpose some of their landscaping for another purpose: creating a “Homegrown National Park,” a connected network of more natural gardens that could help stave off the insect apocalypse and the collapse of broader ecosystems.

  • Current Event
    2 weeks ago
    by geoleo
    +13 +2

    Governments must act to stop the coronavirus – but we can't return to business as usual

    If our aim is to protect human and environmental health, restoring the status quo is not good enough. Thankfully, there is an alternative.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by tukka
    +19 +5

    The carbon cost of home delivery and how to avoid it

    Delivering online shopping to people's homes is a huge source of greenhouse gas emissions, particularly when deliveries fail and the journey needs to be repeated. Researchers are now re-thinking home deliveries to see if there is a better way of doing things, with ideas including robot couriers, jointly owned parcel lockers and an "Uber' for parcels.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by dynamite
    +15 +2

    Arctic 'doomsday vault' stocks up on 60,000 more food seeds

    A "doomsday vault" nestled deep in the Arctic received 60,000 new seed samples on Tuesday, including Prince Charles' cowslips and Cherokee sacred corn, increasing stocks of the world's agricultural bounty in case of global catastrophe.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by wildcard
    +11 +2

    Summers are starting earlier, finishing later and winter is in retreat

    Australia's summers have lengthened by as much as a month or more in the past half century, exposing people to greater fire and heat extremes and placing ecosystems and farm crops at risk. Researchers from The Australia Institute analysed data from 70 of the Bureau of Meteorology's weather stations across southern and sub-tropical Australia, where the bulk of the population lives. They found in the past five years, summers were 50 per cent longer than they were in the mid-20th century.

  • Current Event
    3 weeks ago
    by ubthejudge
    +25 +2

    Viral tweet spreads misinformation about volcanoes and climate change

    In today's world, where even basic facts are being distorted and disputed depending on one's partisan lens, misinformation runs rampant on social media. And there's no topic for which that is truer than the most partisan issue of all in the U.S. today: climate change. This week, a false claim about volcanoes posted on Twitter went viral. The tweet claimed that Tuesday's eruption of Mt. Merapi in Indonesia "spewed more CO2 than every car driven in history. Climate change is natural."