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  • Expression
    8 hours ago
    by zritic
    +10 +1

    Why 536 was ‘the worst year to be alive’

    Ask medieval historian Michael McCormick what year was the worst to be alive, and he's got an answer: "536." Not 1349, when the Black Death wiped out half of Europe. Not 1918, when the flu killed 50 million to 100 million people, mostly young adults. But 536. In Europe, "It was the beginning of one of the worst periods to be alive, if not the worst year," says McCormick, a historian and archaeologist who chairs the Harvard University Initiative for the Science of the Human Past.

  • Expression
    17 hours ago
    by jcscher
    +19 +1

    The Remote Arctic Town that is Melting Away

    As the Arctic loses ice at dramatic rates, people in Qaanaaq, the northernmost town in Greenland, are finding their homes, livelihoods, customs and very survival at risk.

  • Current Event
    1 day ago
    by TNY
    +12 +1

    As climate change accelerates, "ecological grief" becomes catalyst for action

    The signs of serious, destructive climate change have been difficult to miss this year. Hurricanes Florence and Michael caused at least 98 deaths, billions of dollars of destruction, with tens of thousands of lives uprooted. In Iowa, we are seeing increased humidity, which is both uncomfortable and affects crop growth (increasing mold growth, insects, and hindering grain drying) as well as unprecedented rainfall (September saw 7.05 inches of rainfall in Iowa City, compared to the normal average of 3.35 inches).

  • Current Event
    1 day ago
    by zritic
    +27 +1

    Half a degree can make a world of difference

    The average temperature of the planet has been rising since the 1700s and its Industrial Revolution. Three years ago, in 2015, 195 nations signed onto what is known as the Paris Accord. In it, they agreed to curb greenhouse gas emissions to limit that warming by 2100. The goal is not to let it exceed 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit) over preindustrial times. But a new report says there may be big benefits to setting an even lower target.

  • Current Event
    1 day ago
    by baron778
    +20 +1

    UN Says Climate Genocide Is Coming. It’s Actually Worse Than That.

    Just two years ago, amid global fanfare, the Paris climate accords were signed — initiating what seemed, for a brief moment, like the beginning of a planet-saving movement. But almost immediately, the international goal it established of limiting global warming to two degrees Celsius began to seem, to many of the world’s most vulnerable, dramatically inadequate; the Marshall Islands’ representative gave it a blunter name, calling two degrees of warming “genocide.”

  • Current Event
    3 days ago
    by Nelson
    +17 +1

    'Cut lamb and beef' to fight climate change

    The number of sheep and cattle in the UK should be reduced by between a fifth and a half to help combat climate change, a report says. The shift is needed, the government’s advisory Committee on Climate Change (CCC) maintains, because beef and lamb produce most farm greenhouse gases. The report foresees an increase in the number of pigs and chickens because these produce less methane. The farm union NFU said it did not agree with reducing livestock numbers.

  • Current Event
    3 days ago
    by timex
    +8 +1

    Impact crater 19 miles wide found beneath Greenland glacier

    An illustration of the ice-filled crater discovered in Greenland. Photograph: Nasa/Cryospheric Sciences Lab/Natural History Museum of Denmark A huge impact crater has been discovered under a half-mile-thick Greenland ice sheet. The enormous bowl-shaped dent appears to be the result of a mile-wide iron meteorite slamming into the island at a speed of 12 miles per second as recently as 12,000 years ago.

  • Current Event
    5 days ago
    by TheSpirit
    +9 +1

    Science education must reflect reality: We only have 12 years to stop climate change

    A number of states had education bonds on Tuesday’s election ballots. Voters approved bonds to increase funding for education in New Jersey, New Mexico and Rhode Island, while similar bonds or referendums were defeated in Arizona and Colorado. Now legislators need to direct the new funding, as well as existing education funding, where we most desperately need it: science education.

  • Current Event
    5 days ago
    by rexall
    +8 +1

    "I'm a woman who fought wildfires for 7 years. Climate change is absolutely making them worse."

    2018’s wildfires are already proving to be more destructive than last year’s. The Camp Fire near Chico, California has already claimed at least 29 lives, destroyed more than 6,400 structures, and burned more than 111,000 acres since it began last Thursday. It is now the deadliest and most destructive fire in California’s history. Meanwhile, the Woolsey Fire continues to ravage Los Angeles County, burning 85,500 acres. This essay, published during last year’s brutal fire season, tackles many of the same issues as this year’s season.

  • Current Event
    7 days ago
    by ubthejudge
    +2 +1

    50,000 people march in Montreal to demand more climate action

    An estimated 50,000 people marched in Montreal to show their support for climate action on Saturday, as part of a wider campaign with sister marches happening in cities throughout Quebec. The march was organized by a group called The Planet Goes to Parliament. Spokesperson Nathalie Roy said that the movement was born out of increasing frustration from citizens during the recent provincial election campaign.

  • Current Event
    8 days ago
    by dianep
    +22 +1

    People would change their consumption habits to help the climate, study finds

    A new study has found that people would change their consumption habits to help the climate - even if this would have implications for their personal lives and shopping habits - and that this could play a significant role in helping the UK to reduce its carbon emissions.

  • Current Event
    8 days ago
    by geoleo
    +3 +1

    Why Brazil’s New President Poses an Unprecedented Threat to the Amazon

    Newly elected Jair Bolsonaro, an authoritarian nationalist sometimes called the “tropical Trump,” has staked out an environmental agenda that would open the Amazon to widespread development, putting at risk a region that plays a vital role in stabilizing the global climate.

  • Analysis
    11 days ago
    by TentativePrince
    +18 +1

    European Glaciers Have Been Coming and Going for Thousands of Years, But Now They’re Just Going

    2018 was a terrible year for Swiss glaciers.

  • Current Event
    10 days ago
    by jedlicka
    +14 +1

    The House Science Committee May Soon Become... Pro-Science

    FOR THE PAST eight years, climate science has been under a sort of spell in the House of Representatives. Instead of trying to understand it better or even acknowledging some of the field’s current uncertainties, House Science Committee Chairman Rep. Lamar Smith (R-Texas) used his position to harass federal climate scientists with subpoenas while holding hearings on “Making the EPA Great Again” or whether “global warming theories are alarmist” and researchers are pursuing a “personal agenda.”

  • Expression
    9 days ago
    by geoleo
    +11 +1

    Why are you ignoring us? #StopDrivingCar

    We know that most people can’t imagine life without cars, but we also know that time for cars has passed if we want to save the planet for future generations. The stopdrivingcar.club site is intended as a publication that should enable people from all countries in the world to facilitate their transport.

  • Current Event
    9 days ago
    by zyery
    +22 +1

    Opinion | We Have to Save the Planet. So I’m Donating $1 Billion.

    I will give this sum over the next decade to help accelerate land and ocean conservation around the world.

  • Review
    13 days ago
    by geoleo
    +27 +1

    Five products you didn't know were harming the environment

    As Palau bans sunscreen to protect coral reefs, we look at other products causing environmental damage.

  • Current Event
    12 days ago
    by timex
    +14 +1

    The Hole In The Ozone Layer Is Going To Close Completely By 2060

    The UN released a report this week showing the ozone layer is healing, with the hole over the South Pole expected to close completely by 2060. The Scientific Assessment of Ozone Depletion: 2018 has shown a continued decrease in ozone-depleting substances in the Earth's atmosphere since 2000.

  • Current Event
    12 days ago
    by zobo
    +18 +1

    Wealthier people do less in the struggle against climate change

    A collective-risk dilemma experiment with members of the public in Barcelona has shown that people are more or less likely to contribute money to fighting climate change depending on their how wealthy they are. And the results indicate that participants with fewer resources were prepared to contribute significantly more to the public good than wealthier people, sometimes up to twice as much.

  • Current Event
    3 weeks ago
    by takai
    +2 +1

    We're scientists. We know the climate's changing. And we know why.

    At this point, just about everyone recognizes that the climate is changing. Even Donald Trump says, "I think something's happening." Now, the question being debated is why the climate is changing. Though there may be a public debate, there's no debate among scientists like us — decades of research have demonstrated that human activities, primarily the emission of carbon dioxide from the combustion of fossil fuels, are driving the climate change we are experiencing.

  • Current Event
    3 weeks ago
    by cone
    +15 +1

    Climate change may force 200,000 people in Bangladesh to migrate

    Worsening weather conditions are driving farmers in Bangladesh out of their homes. Nearly 200,000 coastal residents will be forced to migrate to inland areas to find alternative livelihoods, according to a recent study. This will be caused by increased inundation and saline contamination of the soil, hitting crop production and incomes, said the study by Valerie Mueller, a research fellow at the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), and Joyce Chen, associate professor at Ohio State University.

  • Current Event
    3 weeks ago
    by canuck
    +23 +1

    This Remote Hawaiian Island Just Vanished

    Hurricane Walaka, one of the most powerful Pacific storms ever recorded, has erased an ecologically important remote northwestern island from the Hawaiian archipelago. Using satellite imagery, federal scientists confirmed Monday that East Island, a critical habitat for endangered Hawaiian monk seals and green sea turtles, was almost entirely washed away earlier this month.

  • Current Event
    3 weeks ago
    by socialiguana
    +3 +1

    Changes in snow coverage threatens biodiversity of Arctic nature

    Many of the plants inhabiting northern mountains depend on the snow cover lingering until late spring or summer. Snow provides shelter for plants from winter-time extreme events but at the same time it shortens the length of growing season, which prevents the establishment of more southern plants. This is why the reduced snow cover may be an even larger threat to the Arctic plants than rising temperatures.

  • Current Event
    3 weeks ago
    by messi
    +20 +1

    NASA's Found a Weird, Rectangular Iceberg in the Antarctica

    Look at that iceberg. It's beautiful. Perfectly rectangular. An object of near geometric perfection jutting into a polar sea of the usual squiggly, chaotic randomness of the natural world. It calls to mind the monolith from "2001: A Space Odyssey." But, unlike the monolith from that very weird movie, this iceberg was not deposited on this world by space aliens. Instead, as Kelly Brunt, an ice scientist with NASA and at the University of Maryland, explained, it was likely formed by a process that's fairly common along the edges of icebergs.

  • Current Event
    3 weeks ago
    by zyery
    +1 +1

    This 12-Year-Old Girl Built a Robot That Can Find Microplastics In the Ocean

    Anna Du was walking along Castle Island’s beach in South Boston when she noticed plastic scattered on the shoreline. She reached down to pick it up, and quickly realized there was many more tiny pieces than she could handle. “When I realized how many pieces there were, it seemed impossible,” says Du, who was in sixth grade at the time.

  • Current Event
    3 weeks ago
    by spacepopper
    +3 +1

    Study: Ozone pollution may be linked to a type of bleeding stroke

    Exposure to the main ingredient in smog may be linked to a type of bleeding stroke, according to new research. Studies have shown an association between clot-caused ischemic stroke, the most common type, and fine particulate matter such as air pollution from car exhaust. But few, if any, have investigated how air pollution like ground-level ozone impacts intracerebral hemorrhage, a bleeding type of stroke which accounts for about 10 percent of all strokes and happens when a weakened vessel ruptures into the surrounding brain.

  • Current Event
    3 weeks ago
    by wetwilly87
    +9 +1

    The battle to curb our appetite for concrete

    We extract billions of tonnes of sand and gravel each year to make concrete for the building industry, and this is having an increasing environmental impact as beaches and river beds are stripped, warn campaigners. Alongside this environmental damage, the building industry is also a major contributor to greenhouse gases - cement manufacturing alone accounts for 7% of global CO2 emissions.

  • Analysis
    3 weeks ago
    by aj0690
    +20 +1

    New York Sues Exxon Mobil, Saying It Deceived Shareholders on Climate Change

    After an investigation of more than three years, the state's attorney general has sued Exxon Mobil, accusing it of downplaying the risks of global warming to its business.

  • Current Event
    3 weeks ago
    by wildcat
    +9 +1

    Climate change swelling Central American migration to US: experts

    Deepening climate change will swell Central American migration to the United States, the region's environment ministers and experts warned Tuesday as a caravan of mostly Honduran migrants trekked towards the US border in defiance of President Donald Trump. "The next migrants are going to be climate migrants," El Salvador's Environment and Natural Resources Minister Lina Pohl told reporters on the sidelines of a conference in Panama.

  • Current Event
    3 weeks ago
    by Chubros
    +14 +1

    The Atlantic and Pacific Ocean hurricane season is most powerful on record this year

    The oceans near North America have been angry this year. When all the hurricanes and tropical storms that have formed in the Atlantic and eastern Pacific Oceans this year are added together, the 2018 hurricane season is the most active season ever recorded, Colorado State University meteorologist Phil Klotzbach announced Tuesday. Florence and Michael were the most destructive storms in the Atlantic, while the eastern Pacific featured several powerhouse storms, including Lane, Rosa, Sergio and now, Willa.

  • Current Event
    3 weeks ago
    by TNY
    +17 +1

    Climate change, overharvesting may doom a pricey parasite

    A parasitic fungus that grows wild throughout the Himalayas and sells for more than its weight in gold could vanish if current harvesting and climate trends continue, according to new research from Stanford University.

  • Current Event
    3 weeks ago
    by TNY
    +20 +1

    If you were thinking of doing environmental crimes, now’s the time

    It’s open season for environmental crimes in the U.S., a new report from Syracuse University’s Transactional Records Access Clearinghouse (TRAC) suggests. Prosecutions under environmental law fell 10 percent for the 2018 fiscal year from their 2017 levels, which were themselves a substantial drop from prior years. Overall, federal prosecutions for environmental crimes are now down 40 percent from 2013 levels.

  • Current Event
    3 weeks ago
    by TNY
    +15 +1

    We can save coral reefs by putting them on ice

    The planet’s coral reefs are in trouble. Thanks to warming and acidifying oceans, the animals that make up coral reefs are dying, turning the reefs themselves into algae-covered ghost towns. This represents a loss of habitat for numerous nearby creatures, many of which evolved to only live in the reefs. So the deaths of the corals can lead to the deaths of many other species. From monitoring the reefs by listening to them to local action and working to understand the dynamics of coral illness, scientists and conservationists...

  • Current Event
    3 weeks ago
    by ppp
    +9 +1

    Climate friendly cooling shows promise

    Researchers in the US have scaled up a new low-cost system that could provide efficient cooling for homes while using very little electricity. The team has developed a roof-top sized array, built from a highly reflective material made from glass and polymers. In tests, the system kept water around 10C cooler than the ambient air when exposed to midday sunlight in summer. The approach could also be scaled up to cool power stations and data centres.

  • Analysis
    3 weeks ago
    by kxh
    +17 +1

    Global stilling: global land wind speeds slowing since 1960

    Wind speeds around the world seem to be decreasing in a phenomenon known as 'stilling' and European scientists are hoping to find out why.