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  • Analysis
    2 years ago
    by dianep
    +19 +1

    There’s No Such Thing as Free Will

    For centuries, philosophers and theologians have almost unanimously held that civilization as we know it depends on a widespread belief in free will—and that losing this belief could be calamitous. Our codes of ethics, for example, assume that we can freely choose between right and wrong. In the Christian tradition, this is known as “moral liberty”—the capacity to discern and pursue the good, instead of merely being compelled by appetites and desires.

  • Analysis
    2 years ago
    by Apolatia
    +5 +1

    A civil servant missing most of his brain challenges our most basic theories of consciousness

    Not much is definitively proven about consciousness, the awareness of one’s existence and surroundings, other than that it’s somehow linked to the brain. But theories as to how, exactly, grey matter generates consciousness are challenged when a fully-conscious man is found to be missing most of his brain. Several years ago, a 44-year-old Frenchman went to the hospital complaining of mild weakness in his left leg. It was discovered then that his skull was filled largely by fluid, leaving just a thin perimeter of actual brain tissue.

  • Analysis
    2 years ago
    by dianep
    +25 +1

    "Knockout" Head Injuries Linked to Parkinson's, but Not Alzheimer's

    There has long been debate about a link between serious blows to the head and the development of neurodegenerative diseases later in life. Research has made cases for and against a relationship between traumatic brain injuries and neurological ailments such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and general dementia. Now the question is drawing ever more scrutiny as the alarming extent of these injuries becomes better known—and new research is finally casting some light on this murky and often quietly terrifying topic.

  • Analysis
    2 years ago
    by tukka
    +24 +1

    Is full-time work bad for our brains?

    Don’t do an IQ test after a full week’s work if you are 40 years or older. You could be disappointed. If you’re over 40, working more than 25 hours of work a week could be impairing your intelligence, according to a study released in February by researchers for the Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research in Australia. The team conducted reading, pattern and memory tests in more than 6,000 workers aged over 40, to see how the number of hours worked each week affects a person’s cognitive ability.

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by AdelleChattre
    +21 +1

    The Four-Dimensional Brain?

    “The brain is a three dimensional object.” It would seem that this is one of the least controversial facts about the brain, something we can all agree on. But now, in a curious new paper, researchers Arturo Tozzi and James F. Peters suggest that the brain might have an extra dimension… (June 11, 2016 )

  • Analysis
    2 years ago
    by hxxp
    +26 +1

    A molecule called ‘Sandman’ could help solve the ‘mystery of sleep’

    Sleep just doesn't make sense. "Think about it," said Gero Miesenböck, a neuroscientist at the University of Oxford. "We do it. Every animal with a brain does it. But obviously it has considerable risks." Sleeping animals are incredibly vulnerable to attacks, with no obvious benefit to make up for it — at best, they waste precious hours that could be used finding food or seducing a mate; at worst, they could get eaten. "If evolution had managed to invent an animal that doesn’t need to sleep ... the selective advantage for it would be immense," Miesenböck said.

  • Expression
    2 years ago
    by AdelleChattre
    +13 +1

    The perils of being your own doctor

    When an experienced physician became convinced he had ALS, none of the specialists he consulted could persuade him he was perfectly healthy. By Mert Erogul.

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by everlost
    +34 +1

    Tracking time can be tricky for children with autism

    Children use their sense of time to guess when the school bell will ring, when to pause while chatting with a friend, and how long it typically takes Dad to buy groceries. A good sense of time makes life less unpredictable, and may also smooth out some social interactions. Most children get better at estimating time as they grow. They learn by averaging their experiences — for instance, previous trips to a supermarket or conversational pauses. Some children have an innate sense of time and rely less on this imprecise averaging tactic.

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by 99bottles
    +19 +1

    Scientists just found the part of our brain that actually gets physics

    Many science students might dread the more complex aspects of physics, but far removed from the mathematical equations that define how our physical world behaves, we each have an inner intuitive sense for how things will bounce, wobble, or fall.

  • Analysis
    2 years ago
    by Maternitus
    +48 +1

    The Man Who Woke Up One Morning and Forgot How to Read

    A strange case that settled a long, contentious debate about the brain.

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by hxxp
    +23 +1

    Psilocybin Shown to Heal and Repair Brain Cells, May Be Promising New PTSD Treatment

    In a 1961 address to the UN General Assembly, President John F. Kennedy said, “Mankind must put an end to war before war puts an end to mankind.” These words still hold poignancy today, even beyond the battlefield. Coming home from war, a six-month deployment on a ship, or simply transitioning from a life in uniform to a life without one, can be difficult, and the statistics back it up. It’s estimated that a sobering 22 Veterans commit suicide every day.1 Most of these veteran suicides are related to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), which arises after a trauma in which your life is in danger or you feel that it’s in danger.

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by TentativePrince
    +16 +1

    Scientists might have just seen the building blocks of memories light up for the first time

    For the first time, scientists have managed to identify what they believe to be the building blocks of memories - specifically, the neurons that handle the information related to where we are and where we've travelled in the past. By lighting up these building blocks in the brains of mice, it's hoped that we can learn more about the way memories form in our own brains, the researchers behind the experiment say.

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by TNY
    +37 +1

    When Blind People Do Algebra, The Brain's Visual Areas Light Up

    People born without sight appear to solve math problems using visual areas of the brain. A functional MRI study of 17 people blind since birth found that areas of visual cortex became active when the participants were asked to solve algebra problems, a team from Johns Hopkins reports in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. "And as the equations get harder and harder, activity in these areas goes up in a blind person," says Marina Bedny, an author of the study and an assistant professor in the department of psychological and brain sciences at Johns Hopkins University.

  • Expression
    2 years ago
    by AdelleChattre
    +19 +1

    Every Body Goes Haywire

    It’s inconceivable to most people that this is it—there is no other, underlying condition. The headaches are the condition itself. By Anna Altman.

  • Analysis
    2 years ago
    by AdelleChattre
    +13 +1

    Was Freud right about dreams all along?

    Gritty, emotional, smelly and dirty: new evidence supports Freud’s long-debunked theory that sex fuels our dreams. By Patrick McNamara.

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by messi
    +11 +1

    First case of CTE diagnosed in MMA fighter

    He was only 25, but Jordan Parsons was a cage fighter, a professional mixed martial artist who on his best nights beat his opponents into submission. On his worst nights, Parsons was sent spiraling to the canvas by devastating blows to his head. Now, six months after he was struck and killed as a pedestrian by an alleged drunken driver, Parsons is the first fighter in the multibillion-dollar MMA industry to be publicly identified as having been diagnosed with the degenerative brain disease known as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE).

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by AdelleChattre
    +26 +1

    Cannabis may enhance night vision

    New research shows that the drug makes cells in the retina more sensitive to light.

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by AdelleChattre
    +8 +1

    Harvard Study Decrypts the Ancient Mystery of Consciousness

    Neuroscientists may have pinpointed the seat of human consciousness. By Christopher Bergland. (Nov. 5, 2016)

  • Analysis
    2 years ago
    by hedman
    +30 +1

    How Your Brain Decides Without You

    Princeton’s Palmer Field, 1951. An autumn classic matching the unbeaten Tigers, with star tailback Dick Kazmaier—a gifted passer, runner, and punter who would capture a record number of votes to win the Heisman Trophy—against rival Dartmouth. Princeton prevailed over Big Green in the penalty-plagued game, but not without cost: Nearly a dozen players were injured, and Kazmaier himself sustained a broken nose and a concussion (yet still played a “token part”). It was a “rough game,” The New York Times described, somewhat mildly, “that led to some recrimination from both camps.” Each said the other played dirty.

  • Analysis
    2 years ago
    by AdelleChattre
    +25 +1

    What our ancestors’ third eye reveals about the evolution of mammals to warm blood

    French philosopher René Descartes believed that the pineal gland, a tiny button of neurons located in the depth of our brain, was the seat of the soul. By Julien Benoit.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by Apolatia
    +34 +1

    Study Links Gut Bacteria to Parkinson’s Disease

    The exact cause of Parkinson’s disease isn’t known. Genetics and environment are possible factors, but now researchers say gut bacteria could contribute to the nervous system disorder. Researchers at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) published a report today in the journal Cell detailing their discovery of a link between intestinal bacteria and Parkinson’s disease (PD). Changes in bacteria, or the bacteria themselves, contribute to — and may even cause — motor skill decline, the scientists concluded.

  • Expression
    1 year ago
    by belangermira
    +34 +1

    The Best Drug for Quitting Smoking Can't Shake Its Suicide Stigma

    One night while watching TV, Chris Kunkel decided to kill himself. “Out of nowhere, it just came over me,” Kunkel told me over the phone. He found a bottle of Tylenol PM in the medicine cabinet, swallowed the contents, and put himself to bed. Kunkel was home alone; his wife and two kids were out of town visiting family, but he was on call for work as an army IT specialist and had to stay behind.

  • Analysis
    1 year ago
    by gottlieb
    +35 +1

    Is there such a thing as an emotional hangover? Researchers find that there is

    Emotional experiences can induce physiological and internal brain states that persist for long periods of time after the emotional events have ended, a team of New York University scientists has found. This study, which appears in the journal Nature Neuroscience, also shows that this emotional "hangover" influences how we attend to and remember future experiences.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by AdelleChattre
    +5 +1

    Split brain does not lead to split consciousness

    A new research study contradicts the established view that so-called split-brain patients have a split consciousness. Instead, the researchers behind the study have found strong evidence showing that despite being characterized by little to no communication between the right and left brain hemispheres, split brain does not cause two independent conscious perceivers in one brain.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by AdelleChattre
    +26 +1

    Brain Architecture Alters to Compensate for Depression

    A study has found structural differences in the cerebral cortex of patients with depression and that these differences normalize with appropriate medication. The stud is the first to report within the context of a randomized, controlled trial, the presence of structural changes in the cerebral cortex during medication treatment for depression and the first to provide in vivo evidence for the presence of anatomical neuroplasticity in human brain.

  • Analysis
    1 year ago
    by funhonestdude
    +27 +1

    Poor Sleep in Early Childhood Linked to Later Cognitive and Behavioral Problems

    A study led by a Massachusetts General Hospital pediatrician finds that children ages 3 to 7 who don’t get enough sleep are more likely to have problems with attention, emotional control and peer relationships in mid-childhood. Reported online in the journal Academic Pediatrics, the study found significant differences in the responses of parents and teachers to surveys regarding executive function – which includes attention, working memory, reasoning and problem solving...

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by melaniee
    +24 +1

    How Poverty Changes the Brain

    You saw the pictures in science class—a profile view of the human brain, sectioned by function. The piece at the very front, right behind where a forehead would be if the brain were actually in someone’s head, is the pre-frontal cortex. It handles problem-solving, goal-setting, and task execution. And it works with the limbic system, which is connected and sits closer to the center of the brain. The limbic system processes emotions and triggers emotional responses, in part because of its storage of long-term memory.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by AdelleChattre
    +31 +1

    Zapping the Brain at Certain Times Improves Memory

    When researchers delivered electrical stimulation stimulation to the brain at very specific times, the participants’ memory improved. By Agata Blaszczak-Boxe.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by mariogi
    +28 +1

    People whose 'brain age' is older than their real age more likely to die early

    Doctors may be able to warn patients if they are at risk of early death by analysing their brains, British scientists have discovered. Those whose brains appeared older than their true age were more likely to die early and to be in worse physical and mental health, a study by Imperial College London found. The research found a way of predicting someone’s “brain age” that could help to spot those at risk of dying young.

  • Analysis
    1 year ago
    by AdelleChattre
    +14 +1

    What causes that feeling of being watched

    You feel somebody is looking at you, but you don’t know why. The explanation lies in some intriguing neuroscience and the study of a strange form of brain injury. By Tom Stafford.

  • Analysis
    1 year ago
    by Gozzin
    +35 +1

    New mechanism behind Parkinson’s disease revealed

    Researchers have identified the precise toxic mechanism at work during an overabundance of the protein alpha-synuclein in neurons—the protein is a key causative agent in the development of Parkinson’s disease.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by junglman
    +25 +1

    Study reveals neurological mechanism in concussions

    New research examines what happens at the neuronal level during a concussion and reveals how a blow to the head causes swellings along the axon of the neuron. The new insights could help researchers to improve symptoms in patients with concussions.

  • Analysis
    1 year ago
    by melaniee
    +2 +1

    What causes that feeling of being watched

    Something makes you turn and see someone watching you. Perhaps on a busy train, or at night, or when you’re strolling through the park. How did you know you were being watched? It can feel like an intuition which is separate from your senses, but really it demonstrates that your senses – particularly vision – can work in mysterious ways.

  • Analysis
    1 year ago
    by AdelleChattre
    +28 +1

    When you split the brain, do you split the person?

    The brain is perhaps the most complex machine in the Universe. It consists of two cerebral hemispheres, each with many different modules. Fortunately, all these separate parts are not autonomous agents. They are highly interconnected... By Yaïr Pinto.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by hxxp
    +8 +1

    Why Dreaming May Be Important for Your Health

    Doctors have warned for years that Americans are not getting enough sleep, with health consequences ranging from drowsy driving and irritability to an increased risk of dementia, heart disease and early death. Now, a recent study suggests that one particular type of sleep may be especially important when it comes to how the brain responds to stressful situations.