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Conversation 10 comments by 5 users
  • worfldorf
    +4

    I guess we won't really have an idea of how many people actually stopped using Reddit altogether because of the AMAgeddon unless Reddit releases their traffic statistics. A few subs including a sub with over 180k subscribers did permanently shut up shop however so their was definitely permanent damage done to the site.

    The AMAgeddon isn't likely to be what kills Reddit but with the large migrations to alternative sites the next time a massive drama storm rolls around people will have an option to leave to already established communities and alternatives.

    • White (edited 3 years ago)
      +3

      If the sub with 180k users you're talking about was crappydesign, he didn't end up shutting it down. He took out all of the custom CSS removed himself as a mod then left. The sub is still running but now without any moderation.

      edit: nevermind. someone already took control as the moderator. That didn't take long.

      • worfldorf (edited 3 years ago)
        +3

        Oh I only saw it on SRD yesterday when he said he was going to keep the sub down Indefinitely and the user base was migrating to CrappyDesign2

    • AinBaya
      +2

      They obviously have a lot of servers running the place, do you think that with less traffic and in turn less ad revenue they'll downsize?

      • worfldorf (edited 3 years ago)
        +4

        I suppose so but I doubt that the AMAgeddon will have caused enough users to permanently leave Reddit altogether for them to need to downsize.

        The difference between the AMAgeddon and the Digg collapse is that Reddit already had its own stable site that could handle the massive influx (whereas Snapzu is invite only and slowing the flow of new users and Voat has had its bandwidth annihilated), already had its own developed culture and a better community (the joke on Reddit at the time is that Digg would get whatever was on the front page 2 days later) and had site functions that where better / expanded upon what Digg had already done.

        I think that the site that will become "The Reddit Killer" will at least need to satisfy the following points.

      • jmcs
        +4

        They are hosted on AWS, they can upscale and downscale on demand.

        • jarekb84
          +3

          For webservers yes, you can turn on more vm's to handle more requests. But I don't think that's an option for their database.

          • jmcs
            +3

            For database it depends, for redis and memcached you have elasticcache. For SQL databases it will depend on the architecture of your application and your sharding strategy.

            • jarekb84
              +3

              True, it always depends, but unless the devs planned for this in their architecture, they'll have a greater bit of difficulty scaling up their data storage and retrieval compared to webservers.

              Look at the guy from Vaot, he started the site as an expermient to learn ASP.NET and C#. I don't know how skilled the devs are behind this site, but it wouldn't surprise me if scaling to millions of users was not at the top of their heads when starting out. Hell, even sites like Twitter had immense problems because the initial idea wasn't built to scale, nor should it have been. YAGNI and all that.

        • AinBaya
          +3

          Oh OK. Cool. Makes it an easy decision then if it's so eaay