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  • Current Event
    4 months ago
    by dianep
    +14 +2

    ‘Wild West’ mentality lingers in US mountain regions

    Distinct psychological mix associated with mountain populations is consistent with the theory that harsh frontiers attracted certain personalities. When historian Frederick Jackson Turner presented his famous thesis on the US frontier in 1893, he described the “coarseness and strength combined with acuteness and acquisitiveness” it had forged in the American character.

  • Current Event
    4 months ago
    by gottlieb
    +15 +4

    A majority of young adults in the U.S. live with their parents for the first time since the Great Depression

    The coronavirus outbreak has pushed millions of Americans, especially young adults, to move in with family members. The share of 18- to 29-year-olds living with their parents has become a majority since U.S. coronavirus cases began spreading early this year, surpassing the previous peak during the Great Depression era.

  • Current Event
    4 months ago
    by zyery
    +18 +2

    Parents Got More Time Off. Then the Backlash Started.

    When the coronavirus closed schools and child care centers and turned American parenthood into a multitasking nightmare, many tech companies rushed to help their employees. They used their comfortable profit margins to extend workers new benefits, including extra time off for parents to help them care for their children.

  • Current Event
    4 months ago
    by jasont
    +4 +1

    COVID-19 makes boat sales soar as families seek social distancing on the water

    Following his March visit to the Greater Philadelphia Boat Show, Gary Kleinschmidt decided, with a mixture of guilt and enthusiasm, that it might be the right time to replace his 22-foot bow rider with a slightly larger boat. Surely, he thought, in the midst of all the unemployment and financial uncertainty unleashed by COVID-19, boat owners and dealers would be desperate to make a deal.

  • Current Event
    5 months ago
    by baron778
    +13 +1

    Do the dead outnumber the living?

    The population of the planet reached seven billion in October, according to the United Nations. But what's the figure for all those who have lived before us? It is often said that there are more people alive today than have ever lived - and this "fact" has raised its head again since the UN announcement about the planet's population reaching a new high.

  • Current Event
    5 months ago
    by takai
    +19 +2

    Millions of Americans are worried they won't be able to make even the minimum payments on their credit cards.

    Amid one of the worst downturns in U.S. history, nearly 80% of credit card holders say they’re worried they won’t be able to continue making even the minimum payments on their debt. The figure comes from a survey by CreditCards.com, which found millennial card holders (91%) are most at risk of missing payments. Meanwhile, 1 in 4 people say the pandemic has pushed them to take on more credit card debt.

  • Expression
    6 months ago
    by Pfennig88
    +1 +1

    The Whiners Who Earn $200,000 and Complain They’re Broke

    Many wealthy Americans insist they aren’t rich, and that has profound implications in electoral politics as well as economic policy. On July 11, MarketWatch published a letter, presumably real, from a reader complaining that she and her husband didn’t qualify for a stimulus payment because they make too much money. Said the upset letter writer:

  • Current Event
    6 months ago
    by hiihii
    +2 +1

    Can you be good without God? The answer may depend on how rich you are, a new survey finds

    Educated people who live in rich countries are far less likely to say belief in God is necessary for good morals, according to a massive new survey of 38,000 people in 34 countries. The survey, released Monday by the Pew Research Center, revealed a gaping "God gap" between relatively rich and poor countries.

  • Current Event
    6 months ago
    by jedlicka
    +12 +2

    Japan Supercomputer Suggests Life Changes Amid Airborne Coronavirus Threat

    Supercomputer-driven models simulated in Japan suggested that operating commuter trains with windows open and limiting the number of passengers may help reduce the risk of coronavirus infections, as scientists warn of airborne spread of the virus. In an open letter published on Monday, 239 scientists in 32 countries outlined evidence that they say shows floating virus particles can infect people who breathe them in.

  • Current Event
    6 months ago
    by jerrycan
    +12 +4

    Lockdown 'funnelling': how the pandemic has changed our relationships

    The coronavirus lockdown has been a unique social experience that has had significant effects on our social relationships. Some have been strengthened while others have come under severe strain. Many people have found themselves confined for prolonged periods of time with other people and have come into conflict with each other. Others have experienced lockdown alone, resulting in profound social isolation. Some of our everyday interactions have intensified and others have not been possible at all.

  • Current Event
    6 months ago
    by yuriburi
    +3 +1

    Organ donation: 'Mum said we don't do it. So we don't'

    "I always tell the story of when I was filling out my driver's licence," says 1Xtra's DJ Ace. "I was 17. I was like, 'Mum, do I fill out this donor bit?' And she was like, 'no, we don't do that'. "I just took that as gospel. My mum said we don't do it. So we don't do it. I never even questioned why. I don't think it's something that the black community do."

  • Current Event
    6 months ago
    by grandtheftsoul
    +3 +1

    Parents of newborns get four more weeks of paid parental leave in NZ, starting today

    The paid parental leave scheme in New Zealand is extending from 22 weeks to 26 weeks, taking New Zealand up to a full six months of leave for new parents. The maximum weekly payment is also increasing by $20 per week.

  • Current Event
    6 months ago
    by rexall
    +2 +1

    What greater good? COVID is unmasking America’s collective action problem.

    Over the pandemic-filled last four months, one thing’s become clear: Face masks can slow the spread of coronavirus and help to flatten the curve. The only issue? Mask-wearing is starting to look like a giant collective action problem — and many Americans are refusing to cooperate. For months, scientists and doctors waffled about the usefulness of masks. The Centers for Disease Control, or CDC, repeatedly told Americans not to buy or wear them if they had no COVID-19 symptoms; in March, Anthony Fauci, one of the top White House advisors on the pandemic, told 60 Minutes that “there’s no reason to be walking around with a mask.”

  • Current Event
    6 months ago
    by ubthejudge
    +2 +1

    Study finds link between sitting all day and risk of dying from cancer

    Sitting for hours on end could heighten someone's risk of later dying from cancer, according to a sobering new study of the relationship between inactivity and cancer mortality. The study was epidemiological, providing a snapshot of people's lives, so it cannot prove cause and effect. But the findings suggest that extremely sedentary people can be as much as 80 per cent more likely to die of cancer than those who sit the least.

  • Current Event
    7 months ago
    by grandtheftsoul
    +19 +3

    Millennials are the biggest — but poorest — generation

    Millennials became the biggest U.S. generation this year, numbering some 73 million people. In terms of wealth, by contrast, they're still living in the shadow of previous generations. Despite making up nearly a quarter of the population, millennials — defined as those born between 1981 and 1996 — own a scant 3% of the country's wealth, according to the Federal Reserve's Survey of Consumer Finances. In comparison, when baby boomers were the age millennials are today (around 1989), they controlled 21% of all national wealth. Generation-X'ers at the same age (in 2004) held 6%.

  • Current Event
    7 months ago
    by jerrycan
    +3 +1

    Would You Rather Be Born Smart or Rich?

    I know, I know, you'd rather be born smart and rich (and charming, and with a lustrous head of hair, and a voice like Michael Bolton's). But if you had to choose? Chances are, your answer depends on whether you think the U.S. economy is a meritocracy—that intelligence and ambition are more important to lifelong success than the circumstances of your birth.

  • Current Event
    7 months ago
    by darvinhg
    +3 +1

    U.S. and China both topple in rankings of the best places to work and do business

    While major countries vie for economic dominance, smaller nations could actually be more effective locations for individuals to work and do business in, according to a new report. The U.S. and China both flopped in the 2020 World Competitive Ranking from the Institute for Management Development (IMD) as ongoing trade tensions continue to weigh on their international standing making way for smaller economies.

  • Expression
    7 months ago
    by jedlicka
    +13 +3

    COVID-19 Broke the Economy. What If We Don’t Fix It?

    Instead of reopening society for the sake of the economy, what if we continued to work less, buy less, make less—for the sake of the planet? At the end of March, Donald Trump tweeted, in all capital letters, "WE CANNOT LET THE CURE BE WORSE THAN THE PROBLEM ITSELF." He was referring to the economic ramifications of shutting down the country in order to protect the public from the novel coronavirus, which has now killed over 100,000 Americans.

  • Current Event
    7 months ago
    by Pfennig88
    +3 +1

    Why Every Environmentalist Should Be Anti-Racist

    Environmentalists tend to be well-meaning, forward-thinking people who believe in preserving the planet for generations to come. They will buy reusable cups, wear ethically made clothing and advocate for endangered species; however, many are hesitant to do the same for endangered Black lives, and might be unclear on why they should.

  • Expression
    7 months ago
    by Chubros
    +4 +1

    1980s Metalhead Kids Are Alright: Scientific Study Shows That They Became Well-Adjusted Adults

    In the 1980s, The Parents Music Resource Center (PMRC), an organization co-founded by Tipper Gore and the wives of several other Washington power brokers, launched a political campaign against pop music, hoping to put warning labels on records that promoted Sex, Violence, Drug and Alcohol Use.