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  • Current Event
    21 hours ago
    by Amabaie
    +7 +4

    Dying star in our galaxy could unleash one of universe's most powerful explosions | CBC News

    About 8,000 light-years from Earth lies a star system unlike any astronomers have ever seen. And within that star system lies a ticking bomb - a gamma-ray burst.

  • Current Event
    23 hours ago
    by dynamite
    +7 +1

    Astronomers find a 'solar twin’ — a star that looks almost exactly like our Sun

    Didn’t we all have that “Parent Trap” fantasy, where we’d come across a long-lost sibling that was separated at birth? That dream didn’t go beyond a movie plot for the most of us, but it's just come true for the Sun. In a rare discovery, an international team of astronomers has found a star that was likely born in the same stellar nursery as our Sun. After analyzing the characteristics of thousands of stars in the Milky Way, the group is confident that they’ve not only found a solar sibling, but possibly a solar twin.

  • Current Event
    4 days ago
    by belangermira
    +27 +2

    Astronomers May Have Just Discovered a Super Earth Just Six Light Years Away

    In a new paper published in the journal Nature, an international team of researchers have shared that there may be a super-Earth orbiting Barnard's Star, a very-low-mass red dwarf star that is only six light years away from regular Earth. The astronomers didn't exactly see the planet, but they do have the data to back up what they believe is out there.

  • Current Event
    8 days ago
    by dianep
    +16 +6

    Gaia spots a 'ghost' galaxy next door

    The Gaia satellite has spotted an enormous 'ghost' galaxy lurking on the outskirts of the Milky Way. An international team of astronomers, including from the University of Cambridge, discovered the massive object when trawling through data from the European Space Agency's Gaia satellite. The object, named Antlia 2 (or Ant 2), has avoided detection until now thanks to its extremely low density as well as a perfectly-chosen hiding place, behind the shroud of the Milky Way's disc. The researchers have published their results online today.

  • Current Event
    4 days ago
    by TNY
    +22 +1

    Scientists are using artificial intelligence to see inside stars using sound waves

    How in the world could you possibly look inside a star? You could break out the scalpels and other tools of the surgical trade, but good luck getting within a few million kilometers of the surface before your skin melts off. The stars of our universe hide their secrets very well, but astronomers can outmatch their cleverness and have found ways to peer into their hearts using, of all things, sound waves.

  • Expression
    3 weeks ago
    by CatLady
    +27 +5

    The year's best astronomy photos

    Some of the winning images from the Royal Observatory Greenwich's annual competition.

  • Analysis
    1 month ago
    by spacepopper
    +30 +9

    Our Solar System Is Even Stranger Than We Thought

    New research shows a pattern of exoplanet sizes and spacing around other stars unlike what we see in our own system

  • Current Event
    3 weeks ago
    by geoleo
    +17 +5

    Which planets do space scientists love most?

    As BepiColombo heads to Mercury — a long-neglected planet — Nature looks at which planets attract scientific missions, and why. Last week, the BepiColombo spacecraft successfully began its seven-year journey to Mercury — only the third-ever mission sent to the planet. The day before, scientists said that NASA’s next Mars rover — intended to be first to gather and return rock samples to Earth — should visit as many places on the red planet as possible.

  • Current Event
    3 weeks ago
    by ppp
    +15 +4

    'Once in a lifetime' video captures moment a meteor explodes in the night sky above a castle

    An astro-photographer has captured the 'once in a lifetime' moment a meteor exploded before disintegrating into the night sky in Shorpshire. The scene, which has been recorded very few times on camera, was caught during an Orionid meteor shower. Orionid meteors occur every Autumn when the Earth is passing through the stream of debris left by Halley's Comet.

  • Current Event
    3 weeks ago
    by everlost
    +14 +3

    Famed planet-hunting spacecraft is dead. Now what?

    Astronomers are building instruments that can characterize the many alien worlds the Kepler spacecraft revealed—and look for signs of life.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by wetwilly87
    +18 +7

    Five in a row—the planets align in the night sky

    For the second time this year, the five brightest planets can be seen at the same time. You can catch them by looking towards the western sky after sunset. The planets will form a line rising up from the horizon. Mercury and Venus are low to the west, with bright Jupiter shining just above. Higher up in the northwestern sky is Saturn, and completing the set of five is the red planet Mars, high overhead.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by dynamite
    +18 +5

    Exoplanet Hunters Have a New Plan to Spot Hidden 'Migrating' Worlds

    There's a telescope that can see thick rings of dust in distant star systems. These rings are huge — wide enough in some cases to encircle most or all the planets in our solar system. And they're the birthplaces of exoplanets. Understanding how they work could teach us about how the planets in our own solar system formed.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by rexall
    +18 +4

    Student discovers slowest ever pulsar star

    Chia Min Tan, a Ph.D. Student based at the Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics in Manchester's School of Physics and Astronomy, was part of an international team including fellow astronomers at Manchester, ASTRON and the University of Amsterdam. The team carried out the observations using the Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR), whose core is located in the Netherlands. Their findings were published in the Astrophysical Journal.

  • Current Event
    3 weeks ago
    by geoleo
    +13 +3

    NASA spies big space bubbles forming around newborn stars

    NASA’s Hubble telescope might still be snapping out of a gyroscope-induced funk, but the space agency’s other powerful space-gazing lenses are still working just fine. In a new post, NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory is showcasing a truly stunning image captured by the Spitzer Space Telescope, which peered into the Milky Way to spot the Cat’s Paw Nebula and the big space bubbles it keeps blowing.

  • Current Event
    3 weeks ago
    by geoleo
    +11 +2

    Number of Habitable Exoplanets Found by NASA's Kepler May Not Be So High After All

    The tally of potentially habitable alien planets may have to be revised downward a bit. To date, NASA's prolific Kepler space telescope has discovered about 30 roughly Earth-size exoplanets in their host stars' "habitable zone" — the range of orbital distances at which liquid water can likely exist on a world's surface. Or so researchers had thought. New observations by the European Space Agency's (ESA) Gaia spacecraft suggest that the actual number is probably significantly smaller — perhaps between two and 12, NASA officials said today (Oct. 26). [Photos: Gaia Spacecraft to Map Milky Way Galaxy]

  • Current Event
    11 days ago
    by yuriburi
    +2 +1

    Ancient Star Found that's Only Slightly Younger than the Universe Itself

    According to the most widely-accepted cosmological theory, the first stars in our Universe formed roughly 150 to 1 billion years after the Big Bang. Over time, these stars began to come together to form globular clusters, which slowly coalesced to form the first galaxies – including our very own Milky Way. For some time, astronomers have held that this process began for our galaxy some 13.51 billion years ago.

  • Analysis
    1 month ago
    by gottlieb
    +17 +6

    Gaia spots stars flying between galaxies

    A team of astronomers using the latest set of data from ESA's Gaia mission to look for high-velocity stars being kicked out of the Milky Way were surprised to find stars instead sprinting inwards -- perhaps from another galaxy.

  • Analysis
    1 month ago
    by gottlieb
    +17 +3

    How did Titan get its haze?

    Titan, Saturn’s largest moon, is enveloped in a thick, hazy atmosphere. One new research collaboration has identified a chemical mechanism that could help to explain how the moon's haze formed. “Both space probes and land-based instruments have identified the chemical composition of the major constituents of the haze,” said Musahid Ahmed, a scientist in Berkeley Lab’s Chemical Sciences Division and co-leader of the study. “However, how some of heavier particles are formed from the lighter gases is still an open question.”

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by ubthejudge
    +12 +3

    Astronomers catch red dwarf star in a superflare outburst

    New observations by two Arizona State University astronomers using the Hubble Space Telescope have caught a red dwarf star in a violent outburst, or superflare. The blast of radiation was more powerful than any such outburst ever detected from the Sun, and would likely affect the habiltability of any planets orbitiing it.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by Pfennig88
    +3 +2

    In a first, astronomers find a blazar that cycles every two years

    After 10 years of observations, scientists have confirmed a two-year cycle in the gamma-ray brightness of a blazar, or a galaxy with a supermassive black hole that consumes mass and produces high-energy jets as a result. Blazars are the most energetic and luminous objects that we have identified so far in the known universe.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by geoleo
    +18 +2

    Look up this weekend: The Orionid meteor shower will light up the sky

    This weekend, go outside and look up in the dark hours before dawn to witness the annual Orionid meteor shower, which will hit its peak overnight on October 21-22. You may have seen a few stray meteors zooming across the sky, leftover Draconids whose peak passed earlier this month or leftover meteors from the South Taurid shower that’s still ongoing. But this week, and more specifically this weekend, the Orionid meteors will be easy to spot.

  • Current Event
    3 weeks ago
    by cone
    +16 +2

    Inside NASA's hunt for exoplanets just like Earth

    Looking around at Earth's neighbors, it's fair to say we're on the most livable planet in our solar system. (Lift your game, Mars.) But while Earth seems unique in being able to support life, it's probably not the only planet in the universe with that distinction. There are other planets, known as exoplanets, which are rocky orbs like ours and which orbit their own stars in other solar systems. If those planets exist in the so-called Goldilocks zone -- the orbital distance around their star that makes them not too hot and not too cold...

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by bradd
    +25 +5

    Morning, Kepler! NASA's Planet-Hunting Spacecraft Wakes Up Again

    The Kepler roller-coaster ride continues. NASA's low-on-fuel Kepler space telescope, which has discovered more than 2,650 alien planets to date, has awoken from yet another slumber and begun making science observations again, agency officials announced today (Sept. 5). The $600 million Kepler mission launched in March 2009, tasked with determining how common Earth-like planets are around the galaxy. The spacecraft initially studied more than 150,000 stars simultaneously, looking for tiny brightness dips caused by the passage of orbiting planets across these stars' faces. [Gallery: A World of Kepler Planets]

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by ppp
    +26 +6

    Pluto should be reclassified as a planet, experts say

    Pluto wrongly lost its planet status, say, scientists, suggesting that the icy dwarf should be reclassified as a planetary body. In 2006, the International Astronomical Union (IAU), a global group of astronomy experts, established a definition of a planet that required it to "clear" its orbit, or in other words, be the largest gravitational force in its orbit.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by funhonestdude
    +15 +3

    Are brown dwarfs stars, planets or neither?

    The universe is filled with billions of massive celestial objects, from stars to planets to comets to asteroids. But what happens when lines start to blur between these classifications, and we just can’t place an object in any major category? Well, brown dwarfs know this better than anyone. They’re far too massive to be planets, but not massive enough for hydrogen atoms to fuse in their cores and become stars.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by jerrycan
    +13 +2

    Skull-Shaped ‘Death Comet’ Will Hurtle Past Earth After Halloween

    A space rock dubbed a “death comet” that eerily resembles a skull is expected to hurtle past Earth shortly after Halloween. Officially known as asteroid 2015 TB145, the comet is expected to fly past Earth at a distance of 25 million miles on Nov. 11, more than three years after it first zoomed past Earth at a much closer distance in October 2015.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by jedlicka
    +17 +2

    Black holes ruled out as universe’s missing dark matter

    For one brief shining moment after the 2015 detection of gravitational waves from colliding black holes, astronomers held out hope that the universe’s mysterious dark matter might consist of a plenitude of black holes sprinkled throughout the universe. UC Berkeley physicists have dashed those hopes.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by geoleo
    +13 +3

    First 'exomoon' may have been found

    Astronomers have announced the possible discovery of the first known moon outside our Solar System. This "exomoon" is not like any in our cosmic neighbourhood: it's the size of Neptune and orbits a planet the size of Jupiter - but with 10 times the mass. The object was spotted in data from Nasa's Kepler spacecraft, and later observed using the Hubble telescope. Astronomers David Kipping and Alex Teachey have published their results in Science Advances journal.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by canuck
    +16 +2

    How Do You Take a Picture of a Black Hole? With a Telescope as Big as the Earth

    We live 26,000 light-years from the center of the Milky Way. That’s a rounding error by cosmological standards, but still — it’s far. When the light now reaching Earth from the galactic center first took flight, people were crossing the Bering Strait land bridge, hunting woolly mammoths along the way.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by zyery
    +13 +2

    The 8-dimensional space that must be searched for alien life

    A new mathematical model suggests that signs of extraterrestrial intelligence could be common, for all we know—we’ve barely begun investigating the vastness where they might lie. The Fermi paradox is the contrast between the likelihood of life existing elsewhere in the universe and the lack if evidence for it. This is a significant conundrum. On the one hand, there is a strong sense that the conditions on Earth that led to the emergence of life cannot be unique. This makes it seem likely that life must be common.

  • Current Event
    11 months ago
    by ppp
    +51 +12

    Nasa finds solar system filled with as many planets as our own

    Nasa has found an entire solar system with as many planets as our own. The discovery of a new planet around the Kepler-90 star, which looks like our own sun, means the distant solar system has a total of eight known planets. And those planets look like those in our own neighbourhood: rocky planets orbit close to the star, with gas giants further away.

  • Analysis
    10 months ago
    by lostwonder
    +36 +10

    First Blue Moon eclipse in 150 years happens in January

    We’ve all heard the old expression “Once in a blue moon” and it means something happens very rarely. The last time an actual blue moon total lunar eclipse happened was over 150 ye…

  • Image
    10 months ago
    by NotWearingPants
    +31 +9

    Jupiter's Cloud Belts

    Enhanced color image from Juno

  • Analysis
    10 months ago
    by LisMan
    +29 +12

    Why do meteoroids explode in the atmosphere?

    Researchers have identified a new and previously overlooked process for air penetration that may explain the powerful explosion of the Chelyabinsk meteoroid.

  • Current Event
    9 months ago
    by zyery
    +20 +6

    Astronomers use a Galaxy Cluster as an Extremely Powerful "Natural Telescope" to Peer Even Farther into the Universe

    When it comes to studying some of the most distant and oldest galaxies in the Universe, a number of challenges present themselves. In addition to being billions of light years away, these galaxies are often too faint to see clearly. Luckily, astronomers have come to rely on a technique known as Gravitational Lensing, where the gravitational force of a large object (like a galactic cluster) is used to enhance the light of these fainter galaxies.