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  • the7egend
    +3

    It's funny, because there have been reports about how bad crime is among gangs and such who still have plenty of weapons. Also, a lot of Australian's actually buried their guns, since they were buried they were technically 'no longer in possession'.

    • Boudicca (edited 3 years ago)
      +3

      I live in Australia and I can tell you the gun buy back scheme was highly successful.

      "The United States has the highest rate of private gun ownership of any developed nation, at nearly 89 firearms per 100 people. It also leads overwhelmingly in the number of firearm deaths.

      For every 1 million Americans, there are 29.7 homicides by firearm each year, the Human Development Index reported.

      Switzerland, the nation with the next highest rate, has 7.7 firearm homicides per million people, while Australia, which saw its gun death rate plunge by more than half since 1996 when it tightened gun laws, has just 1.4 firearm homicides per million."

      http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-08-28/a-look-at-gun-violence-laws-in-america/6731234

    • racerxonclar
      +2

      Both situations can be true, truthfully. It could have made a big difference and there still be a lot of gun violence, just because the problem was that large in the first place. A similar situation would likely happen in the United States if any large scale gun collection was attempted. There's just so many.

      • Boudicca
        +1

        Australia has never had a big gun loving culture like America. Mainly duck, kangaroo and pig hunters, farmers, and the odd criminal. What happened was we had a massacre at a tourist spot in Tasmania, 35 killed,28 injured. That one event was enough to facilitate change- the article goes more into this.

        People generally don't aspire to own guns here.There are one or two gun clubs in my state, one of which is within hearing distance of my workplace and the people I have met who go there come across as red necks. I can remember the first time I saw a policeman wearing a gun- I had been living overseas for a few years and came home (1987) and was in a shop standing next to a cop- and there was what looked to me like an enormous gun holstered on his belt. It made me feel sick. Someone just standing there with a gun in plain sight. It still makes me feel weirded out when I see that.

        Its seems (as someone who doesn't live in America) that because there are so many guns in the USA, even if you hate guns you are almost obliged to own one because every other bastard has one.

        I have never spent a single second in my life worrying about me, my kids, or anyone else I love getting shot. Thats freedom to me.