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  • Analysis
    2 years ago
    by drunkenninja
    +27 +1

    Electron microscope reveals bacteria motor parts in incredible unprecedented detail

    A new study of the exotic “motors” that bacteria use to swim reveals details of how they “swim” that may make it possible to design specific drugs that sabotage the flagella (tails) in targeted bacterial species. Using a newly installed high-powered electron microscope, researchers at Imperial College London, led by Morgan Beeby, PhD from the Department of Life Sciences, has been able visualize these motors in unprecedented detail.

  • Analysis
    2 years ago
    by geoleo
    +19 +1

    Genes that jump species: does this shake the tree of life?

    Genes that leap from one species to another are more common than we thought. Does this shake up the tree of life? Fay-Wei Li stepped out of his car and looked around. There was not much to see aside from an old wooden fence and a soggy ditch strewn with roadside detritus. Could this really be the spot? A biologist at Duke University, Li had driven seven hours from North Carolina to these exact coordinates in Florida in search of hornworts: the living descendants of...

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by Petrox
    +36 +1

    This common bacterium grows 60% better in space than on Earth

    It’s something that no one can explain right now, but scientists have found that of the 48 harmless bacteria strains they’ve been raising on the International Space Station, one has not just adapted to its new microgravity environment some 400 km above Earth - it prefers it. According to a new study, Bacillus safensis JPL-MERTA-8-2 - a strain that was first discovered on one of the Mars Exploration Rovers at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida before they...

  • Analysis
    2 years ago
    by drunkenninja
    +22 +1

    Gut bacteria regulate nerve fibre insulation

    Research suggests that gut bacteria may directly affect brain structure and function, offering new ways to treat multiple sclerosis and psychiatric conditions.

  • Analysis
    2 years ago
    by rawlings
    +30 +1

    How ancient horse-dung bacteria is helping our team locate where Hannibal crossed the Alps

    Despite thousands of years of hard work by brilliant scholars, the great enigma of where Hannibal crossed the Alps to invade Italy remained unsolved. But now it looks like we may just have cracked it – all thanks to modern science and a bit of ancient horse poo. As a microbiologist, I was part of the team that carried out the research. Hannibal was the leader of the Carthaginian army during the Second Punic War with Rome (218-201BC).

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by TNY
    +28 +1

    1 in 3 antibiotics prescribed in U.S. are unnecessary, major study finds

    The in-depth analysis found majority are for colds, sore throat, other viral illnesses that don't respond to antibiotics.

  • Analysis
    2 years ago
    by canuck
    +21 +1

    Could yoghurt cure dandruff? Bacteria key to keeping flakes at bay, say researchers

    The next time dandruff dots your shoulders, you might want to reach for yogurt, not shampoo. The latest study into scaly scalps has found that nurturing particular bacteria on the skin could keep the white flakes at bay. Researchers in Shanghai took on the dandruff problem with an unprecedented investigation into flaky scalps and the ecosystem of microbes that set up home on the human head, feeding on the lavish menu of dead skin and oily secretions called sebum.

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by zritic
    +41 +1

    The Gates Foundation is trying to stop Zika by giving mosquitos a sexually transmitted disease

    The approach releases bugs with a bacteria that would render them and their offspring unable to transmit disease. Ordinarily the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation is in the business of stopping diseases rather than spreading them. When it comes to mosquitoes, though, the foundation is funding an approach that aims to spread a disease among mosquitoes that would prevent those bugs from spreading Zika and other diseases.

  • Analysis
    2 years ago
    by belangermira
    +29 +1

    How One Strain of Plague Bacterium Ravaged Eurasia

    Even today, the specter of the Black Death looms over society. The disease, caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis, began a deadly march through Eurasia starting in the mid-14th century, killing hundreds of thousands along the way. And researchers from the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History believe that a single strain of the bacterium is to blame, and it remains the source of modern plague epidemics.

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by Petrox
    +35 +1

    A 'slow catastrophe' unfolds as the golden age of antibiotics comes to an end

    In early April, experts at a military lab outside Washington intensified their search for evidence that a dangerous new biological threat had penetrated the nation’s borders. They didn’t have to hunt long before they found it. On May 18, a team working at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research here had its first look at a sample of the bacterium Escherichia coli, taken from a 49-year-old woman in Pennsylvania. She had a urinary tract infection with a disconcerting knack for surviving the assaults of antibiotic medications. Her sample was one of six from across the country delivered to the lab of microbiologist Patrick McGann.

  • Analysis
    2 years ago
    by Gozzin
    +18 +1

    What’s Your Gut Microbiome Enterotype?

    If whatever gut flora enterotype we are could play an important role in our risk of developing chronic diet-associated diseases, the next question is can we alter our gut microbome by altering our diet? And the answer is -- diet can rapidly and reproducibly alter the bacteria in our gut, the subject of my next video, How to Change Your Enterotype.

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by TNY
    +18 +1

    Gonorrhea May Soon Be Resistant to all Antibiotics

    Gonorrhea may soon become untreatable. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Thursday that the wily Neisseria gonorrhoeae bacteria may be developing resistance to the only two antibiotics left that can cure the sexually transmitted disease. The drugs, azithromycin and ceftriaxone, are used in combination to treat gonorrhea, a strategy experts hope will prolong the period during which these critical drugs will work.

  • Analysis
    2 years ago
    by hxxp
    +27 +1

    Scientists may have found a way to extend the shelf life of milk to two months

    Milk, the first thing mammals consume after birth, is full of protein, vitamins, and minerals. But it doesn’t keep very long. That’s because raw milk is also full of bacteria. How long it stays fresh depends on how it’s treated. Most supermarket milk has been pasteurized and if unopened can keep in the fridge for around a week. Milk that is heated to temperatures above 135ºC (275 °F) can keep as long as six months at room temperature if unopened. But ultra-high temperature milk doesn’t taste very good.

  • Analysis
    2 years ago
    by socialiguana
    +33 +1

    Is your gut making you sick?

    A gut full of diverse microbes – bacteria, viruses and fungi – is essential for a healthy mind and body. And evidence is growing that our modern diet, overuse of antibiotics and obsession with cleanliness are damaging the diversity of microbes that live in our guts, contributing to a range of conditions including depression, multiple sclerosis, obesity and rheumatoid arthritis. Microbes live in our guts, bodily fluids, cavities and skin. For every one of our human cells, there’s at least one of them.

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by weekendhobo
    +46 +1

    First new antibiotic in 30 years discovered in major breakthrough

    The first new antibiotic to be discovered in nearly 30 years has been hailed as a ‘paradigm shift’ in the fight against the growing resistance to drugs. Teixobactin has been found to treat many common bacterial infections such as tuberculosis, septicaemia and C. diff, and could be available within five years. But more importantly it could pave the way for a new generation of antibiotics because of the way it was discovered.

  • Analysis
    2 years ago
    by 8mm
    +27 +1

    Why paper cuts hurt so much

    Paper seems completely harmless, but anybody who has refilled a photocopier or thumbed too quickly through a book knows that this humble material harbours a deep, dark secret. Deployed properly, it can be a serious weapon: paper cuts are just the worst. There isn’t a whole lot of scientific research effort directed at understanding the pain of paper cuts, probably because nobody would sign up for a randomised, controlled study that involved a researcher intentionally inflicting this kind of torture on study participants.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by doodlegirl
    +31 +1

    Our last line of defense against antibiotic-resistant bacteria is beginning to fail, says ECDC

    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in the US, every year about two million people become infected with bacteria that are resistant to anything we can throw at them and of those, at least 23,000 die. Now the European equivalent to the CDC, the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) has just reported on how well the EU is doing in the battle to keep deadly bugs at bay. And the news isn't great.

  • Analysis
    1 year ago
    by spacepopper
    +2 +1

    16% of Cancers Are Caused by Viruses or Bacteria

    Strictly speaking, cancer is not contagious. But a fair number of cancers are clearly caused by viral or bacterial infections: lymphomas can be triggered by the Epstein-Barr virus, which also causes mononucleosis. Liver cancers can be caused by Hepatitis B and C. Cervical cancers can be caused by human papillomavirus, the major reason behind the development of a vaccine against it. For some of these cancers, nearly 100% of the cases have an infectious link...

  • Analysis
    1 year ago
    by ubthejudge
    +11 +1

    Alien life could thrive in the clouds of failed stars

    There’s an abundant new swath of cosmic real estate that life could call home—and the views would be spectacular. Floating out by themselves in the Milky Way galaxy are perhaps a billion cold brown dwarfs, objects many times as massive as Jupiter but not big enough to ignite as a star. According to a new study, layers of their upper atmospheres sit at temperatures and pressures resembling those on Earth, and could host microbes that surf on thermal updrafts. The idea expands the concept of a habitable zone to include a vast population of worlds that had previously gone unconsidered.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by Apolatia
    +34 +1

    Study Links Gut Bacteria to Parkinson’s Disease

    The exact cause of Parkinson’s disease isn’t known. Genetics and environment are possible factors, but now researchers say gut bacteria could contribute to the nervous system disorder. Researchers at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) published a report today in the journal Cell detailing their discovery of a link between intestinal bacteria and Parkinson’s disease (PD). Changes in bacteria, or the bacteria themselves, contribute to — and may even cause — motor skill decline, the scientists concluded.

  • Analysis
    1 year ago
    by geoleo
    0 +1

    Will Viruses Save Us From Superbugs?

    For years, Ali Khodadoust walked around with his heart literally open to the world. In 2012 surgeons replaced his aortic arch and unknowingly planted bacteria. The bacteria secreted a sticky biofilm and burrowed a channel through his chest, creating a peephole to the open air.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by larylin
    +29 +1

    Prostate cancer laser treatment cures half of trial subjects

    A new prostate cancer treatment that combines lasers and deep-sea bacteria could be "truly transformative," according to a team of researchers. A trial conducted with 415 men across Europe finished with nearly half completely free of cancer compared to 13.5 percent given regular treatment. To top it off, unlike with current, aggressive therapies that can cause impotence and urinary incontinence, most of the subjects were free of side effects after two years.

  • Analysis
    1 year ago
    by zyery
    +22 +1

    Ancient Chinese malaria remedy fights TB

    A centuries-old herbal medicine, discovered by Chinese scientists and used to effectively treat malaria, has been found to potentially aid in the treatment of tuberculosis and may slow the evolution of drug resistance. In a promising study led by Robert Abramovitch, a Michigan State University microbiologist and TB expert, the ancient remedy artemisinin stopped the ability of TB-causing bacteria, known as Mycobacterium tuberculosis, to become dormant. This stage of the disease often makes the use of antibiotics ineffective.

  • Expression
    1 year ago
    by dianep
    +2 +1

    Man’s best friend, bacteria’s worst enemy

    Hospital ID badge dangling from his neck, Angus considered the empty bed in front of him. After a few strong sniffs, he moved on. Nearing the next bed, his floppy ears perked up before he stopped dead in his tracks, tapping his paw and eyeing his handler expectantly.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by dianep
    +38 +1

    Diarrhea-causing Salmonella can be weaponized to flush out cancer

    A notorious germ best known for getting people rushing to the bathroom may one day have cancer patients headed to clinics for a new treatment instead. With some genetic tweaking, Salmonella typhimurium transformed from a germ that causes mayhem in people’s intestines to one that can infiltrate deep into the bowels of tumors and spark immune system warfare.

  • Analysis
    1 year ago
    by yuriburi
    +36 +1

    No More ‘Superbugs’? Maple Syrup Extract Enhances Antibiotic Action

    Antibiotics save lives every day, but there is a downside to their ubiquity. High doses can kill healthy cells along with infection-causing bacteria, while also spurring the creation of “superbugs” that no longer respond to known antibiotics. Now, researchers may have found a natural way to cut down on antibiotic use without sacrificing health: a maple syrup extract that dramatically increases the potency of these medicines.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by geoleo
    +14 +1

    Resistance to last-ditch antibiotic has spread farther than anticipated

    Eighteen months ago, a gene that confers resistance to colistin — known as an ‘antibiotic of last resort’ — emerged in bacteria from pigs in China. Since then, the resistance gene, called mcr-1, has been found around the world at an alarming rate, according to several presentations at the American Society for Microbiology (ASM) meeting in New Orleans, Louisiana, last week.

  • Analysis
    1 year ago
    by LisMan
    +43 +1

    Brains With Alzheimer's Have More Bacteria Than Healthy Ones, Says New Study

    New research shows bacteria that break through the brain's defences and infected neurons could play a role in the onset of Alzheimer's, giving experts a better understanding of the disease and ways we could treat it.

  • Analysis
    1 year ago
    by Chubros
    +34 +1

    Your kitchen sponge harbors zillions of microbes. Cleaning it could make things worse

    That sponge in your kitchen sink harbors zillions of microbes, including close relatives of the bacteria that cause pneumonia and meningitis, according to a new study. One of the microbes, Moraxella osloensis, can cause infections in people with a weak immune system and is also known for making laundry stink, possibly explaining your sponge’s funky odor. Researchers made the discovery by sequencing the microbial DNA of 14 used kitchen sponges, they report this month in Scientific Reports.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by mariogi
    +45 +1

    For the First Time Tiny Robots Treat Infection in a Living Organism

    Scientists from the department of NanoEngineering at the University of California San Diego were able to successfully use chemically-powered micromotors to deliver antibiotics in the gut of a mouse and treat a gastric bacterial infection. It is the first use of such technology in a living organism and could pave the way for further applications in treating various types of diseases. The study was published in Nature Communications.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by Petrox
    +17 +1

    Stainless steel sinks may up your risk of legionnaires’ disease

    A combination of rusty water and stainless steel taps, or faucets, can put people at risk of life-threatening legionnaires’ disease. It’s already known that rust particles in a water system, which can come from iron pipes, encourage the growth of Legionella bacteria. These bacteria cause legionnaires’ disease, which can involve headaches, muscle pain, fever and confusion. The condition has been on the rise in Europe: in 2015, there were 7000 known cases...

  • Analysis
    1 year ago
    by drunkenninja
    +27 +1

    Bacteria Use Brainlike Bursts of Electricity to Communicate

    Bacteria have an unfortunate—and inaccurate—public image as isolated cells twiddling about on microscope slides. The more that scientists learn about bacteria, however, the more they see that this hermitlike reputation is deeply misleading, like trying to understand human behavior without referring to cities, laws or speech. “People were treating bacteria as … solitary organisms that live by themselves,” said Gürol Süel, a biophysicist at the University of California, San Diego. “In fact, most bacteria in nature appear to reside in very dense communities.”

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by Nelson
    +1 +1

    See jerkface bacteria hiding in tumors and gobbling chemotherapy drugs

    Of all the kinds of bacteria, some are charming and beneficial, others are malicious and dangerous—and then there are the ones that are just plain turds. That’s the case for Mycoplasma hyorhinis and its ilk. Researchers caught the little jerks hiding out among cancer cells, gobbling up chemotherapy drugs intended to demolish their tumorous digs. The findings, reported this week in Science, explain how some otherwise treatable cancers can thwart powerful therapies.

  • Analysis
    11 months ago
    by wildcat
    +21 +1

    Quantum dots and antibiotics are a lethal combo for drug-resistant superbugs

    Bacteria that are resistant to current antibiotics are a growing—and alarming—problem. A new solution comes from an unexpected place: light-activated chemicals that supercharge antibiotics so that bacteria cannot withstand them. Drug-resistant infections are a serious concern. Some strains of the bacteria Escherichia coli (more commonly known as E. coli), for example, have become resistant to drugs like carbapenem, usually considered antibiotics of last resort.

  • Current Event
    11 months ago
    by messi
    +33 +1

    A new study shows that liver cancer in Asia is linked to herbal remedies

    Researchers have uncovered widespread evidence of a link between traditional Chinese herbal remedies and liver cancer across Asia, a study said Wednesday. The findings suggest stronger measures are needed to prevent people from consuming chemicals called aristolochic acids (AA), which are derived from the woody vines of the Aristolochia plant family, said the report in the journal Science Translational Medicine.