LOUNGE all new asksnapzu ideasforsnapzu newtribes interesting pics videos funny technology science technews gaming health history worldnews business web research entertainment food living internet socialmedia mobile space sports photography nature animals movies culture travel television finance music celebrities gadgets environment usa crime politics law money justice psychology security cars wtf art google books lifetips bigbrother women apple kids recipes whoa military privacy education facebook medicine computing wildlife design war drugs middleeast diet toplists economy fail violence humor africa microsoft parenting dogs canada neuroscience architecture religion advertising infographics sex journalism disaster software aviation relationships energy booze life japan ukraine newmovies nsa cannabis name Name of the tribe humanrights nasa cute weather gifs discoveries cops futurism football earth dataviz pets guns entrepreneurship fitness android extremeweather fashion insects india northamerica
Submit a link
Start a discussion
  • Expression
    3 months ago
    by TNY
    +22 +5

    People are always going to use drugs - at least let's make it safer for them

    DCU's SeshSafe project is now providing students with drug-testing kits and information on drug safety, to check illegal drugs in an experiment seeking to reduce risks from adulterated substances. SeshSafe is the brainchild of DCU student and chairperson of the university's Students for Sensible Drug Policy (SSDP) group, Eleanor Hulm. After the deaths of three people in Cork and Dublin last year after drug use at parties, Ms Hulm took the initiative to provide a safe drug-testing kit to students in various Irish universities.

  • Analysis
    3 months ago
    by rookshook
    +35 +10

    The Gig Economy Celebrates Working Yourself to Death

    America’s self-reliance obsession makes it more acceptable to applaud working yourself to death than to argue that doing so points to a flawed economic system.

  • Current Event
    3 months ago
    by sasky
    +22 +5

    Millennials earn 20% less than Boomers did at same stage of life

    Baby Boomers: your millennial children are worse off than you. With a median household income of $40,581, millennials earn 20 percent less than boomers did at the same stage of life, despite being better educated, according to a new analysis of Federal Reserve data by the advocacy group Young Invincibles.

  • Analysis
    2 months ago
    by gladsdotter
    +35 +9

    A world without retirement

    The long read: The population is getting older and the welfare state can no longer keep up. After two months talking to people in Britain about retirement, it’s clear that old age is an increasingly scary prospect

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by sauce
    +22 +7

    Disabled, or just desperate? Rural Americans turn to disability as jobs dry up

    In rural Alabama, a man faced a difficult choice: Keep looking for work, or apply for disability? The lobby at the pain-management clinic had become crowded with patients, so relatives had gone outside to their trucks to wait, and here, too, sat Desmond Spencer, smoking a 9 a.m. cigarette and watching the door. He tried stretching out his right leg, knowing these waits can take hours, and winced. He couldn’t sit easily for long, not anymore, and so he took a sip of soda and again thought about what he should do.

  • Analysis
    2 months ago
    by TentativePrince
    +10 +4

    Why do developers who could work anywhere flock to the world’s most expensive cities?

    Politicians and economists lament that certain alpha regions -- SF, LA, NYC, Boston, Toronto, London, Paris -- attract all the best jobs while becoming..

  • Analysis
    2 months ago
    by gladsdotter
    +34 +4

    The Original Natural Remedy for Burnout: Nature

    A new book argues that spending time outside can serve as a welcome reprieve from the constant stimuli of modern life.

  • Analysis
    2 months ago
    by AdelleChattre
    +18 +3

    Our Climate Future Is Actually Our Climate Present

    How do we live with the fact that the world we knew is going and, in some cases, already gone? By Jon Mooallem.

  • Expression
    1 month ago
    by AdelleChattre
    +12 +2

    Yoga Classes Should Be Shorter

    The light in me honors the light in you, but is also extremely busy. By Olga Khazan.

  • Analysis
    1 month ago
    by LisMan
    +15 +2

    When Is It Worth Worrying About Dementia?

    Alzheimer's is the result of a combination of risks you can and cannot control. Here's how to ground yourself before the next wave of Alzheimer's hysteria.

  • Current Event
    3 weeks ago
    by socialiguana
    -1 +1

    Ontario becomes 2nd province to go ahead with $15 an hour minimum wage

    Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne has announced a plan to increase the provincial minimum wage to $15 an hour by Jan. 1, 2019. The increase would be phased in over the next 18 months, rising to $14 an hour on Jan. 1, 2018, and then to $15 the following January. After that, it will rise annually with inflation.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by dianep
    +44 +17

    The curse of the people who can’t stop making puns

    Derek’s wife had put up with more than most people could stand before she finally decided to call the doctor. Almost every night, her husband would wake her up from sleep to tell her another bon mot that had just come to mind. In a bid to finally get a good night’s rest, she eventually persuaded him to write them down rather than telling her directly. Soon, he had filled 50 pages with witticisms such as...

  • Expression
    1 year ago
    by geoleo
    +51 +15

    It's illegal to take this photo

    It is illegal to post pictures of storms online, authorities in the United Arab Emirates have warned. Posting negative images or rumours about the recent flooding could be punished under the country's cybercrime laws, the interior ministry said. Damaging the country's reputation online is punishable imprisonment and a fine of up to 1m Emirati Dirhams (£189,500), the International Business Times reported.

  • Expression
    1 year ago
    by belangermira
    +48 +12

    The fight against food fraud

    Behind the bomb-proofed doors of a laboratory in Northern Ireland, a short monotone bell rings: a warning that an electrical current is about to pass through the laser knife that Rachel Hill holds in her blue-rubber-gloved hand. Hill uses the laser knife to score a fillet of fish with a strange tattoo, leaving a burnt stripe. The bell rings again, and she makes another incision.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by wetwilly87
    +38 +12

    USPS Will Cut Postage Rates This Weekend, Isn’t Happy About It

    If you’ve been stocking up on Forever stamps since the last price hike at the beginning of 2014, we have some bad news: those the price of first-class stamps will fall by 2¢ down to 47¢ this weekend. That might perhaps causing slight annoyance for consumers, but will hurt the U.S. Postal Service financially. The price cut, you see, wasn’t their idea. The price cut came from the government entity that regulates the postal service, the logically named Postal Regulatory Commission.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by ilyas
    +35 +10

    City of San Francisco says it's illegal to live in a box

    Last month, the story of a 25-year-old man who's living inside a plywood box parked in his friend's living room became the latest installment in San Francisco's crazy housing market. In a city where the average rent for a one-bedroom apartment is currently $3,590, Peter Berkowitz's tale of paying only $400 a month in rent and squeezing into some 32-square-feet of space became the stuff of legend.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by hedman
    +42 +11

    Could 'actual innocence' save the broken US justice system?

    In St Clair County, Illinois, a prosecutor is trying a radical experiment: admitting he may have charged innocent people with crimes. It's a unique new kind of "innocence project". Lashonda Moreland's day had barely begun when the pounding on the front door began. Her husband had already left for work, and she was home with her two children in their second storey apartment in a suburb of St Louis, Missouri.

  • Expression
    1 year ago
    by aj0690
    +42 +9

    Orwell understood privacy, power better than most

    "Big Brother is watching you" is George Orwell's most famous line from his most famous book. But there's so much more to the man who gave us terms like "doublethink," "thoughtcrime" and "newspeak"; Orwell reminds us there's a connection between clarity of language and truth. That's why he implores us to be vigilant, to be on guard for freedom, and to keep the faith: the triple faiths of decency, tolerance and humanity.

  • Expression
    1 year ago
    by TNY
    +43 +10

    Russia's nuclear nightmare flows down radioactive river

    At first glance, Gilani Dambaev looks like a healthy 60-year-old man and the river flowing past his rural family home appears pristine. But Dambaev is riddled with diseases that his doctors link to a lifetime’s exposure to excessive radiation, and the Geiger counter beeps loudly as a reporter strolls down to the muddy riverbank.

  • Analysis
    1 year ago
    by larylin
    +43 +10

    Rock stars really do die young: study finds musicians die 25 years younger than average person

    Australian study of 13,000 rock and pop stars finds they die younger and suggests music industry should assist depressed musicians. Pop and rock stars die up to 25 years younger than the average person and have far higher rates of death by accident, suicide and homicide, an Australian study has found. The study by a Sydney University academic says the "disturbing" findings suggest the music industry needs to stop "valorising" bad behaviour and destructive lifestyles.

  • Expression
    1 year ago
    by Nelson
    +36 +10

    Prison phones are a predatory monopoly. One family fought back — and won.

    Every Sunday, while he was locked up in prison, Ulandis Forte would call his grandmother, Martha Wright. She would answer her old rotary, relay news from their church, and pass the phone to his sisters or to his nephew. Wright’s glaucoma made it difficult to stay in touch through letters, and apart from the rare in-person visit, the phone became Forte’s primary link to his former life. In his lowest moments, Wright would pray over her grandson through the receiver.

  • Expression
    1 year ago
    by cone
    +44 +8

    ‘I had to wear Pampers’: The cruel reality the people who bring you cheap chicken allegedly endure

    While concerns about food safety and animal welfare dominate discussions about the perils of the modern food system, there's a downside that many might find just as troubling: the often inhumane conditions people who work in the industry face. A new report by Oxfam America, an arm of the international anti- poverty and injustice group, alleges that poultry industry workers are "routinely denied breaks to use the bathroom" in order to optimize the speed of production.

  • Analysis
    1 year ago
    by hedman
    +38 +8

    Healthiest weight just might be ‘overweight’

    Packing on a few pounds may not be such a bad thing. As a group, overweight people are living the longest nowadays, suggests an almost four-decade study in Denmark published May 10 in JAMA. And obese people seem to be at no higher risk of dying than those of normal weight. The new analysis fuels ongoing debate about what’s a healthy body mass index — especially in light of rising obesity rates, improved heart health treatments and other factors influencing health and longevity.

  • Expression
    1 year ago
    by socialiguana
    +37 +16

    Bits of me

    She is between the ages of 25–34. Or she’s under 32. She is a millen­nial. She’s inferred married. But she uses her phone like a single lady. She completed high school. She votes, but she’s not regis­tered in a party. She lives in the home she has owned for four­teen years. Or she lives away from her home­town. She’s an Expat (US). She returned from a trip two weeks ago. She drives a Honda ACCORD, has owned a truck, and intends to purchase a vehicle soon. She might like RVs...

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by zobo
    +28 +8

    Across Africa, the worst food crisis since 1985 looms for 50 million

    Harvest should be the time for celebrations, weddings and full bellies in southern Malawi. But Christopher Witimani, Lilian Matafle and their seven children and four grandchildren had nothing to celebrate last week as they picked their meagre maize crop. Last year’s drought, followed by erratic rains, hit the village of Nkhotakota hard. But this year the rains never came and, for a second year running, the family grain store is empty. If they manage their savings carefully and eat just one small meal a day, they may just have enough food for two more months.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by ubthejudge
    +22 +7

    Baker allowed to pay child support in pizza

    A court in Italy has ruled that child support can be paid in the form of pizza after a divorced baker supplied his ex-wife with €400 ($664) worth every month. A 50-year-old pizza baker from a small village outside Padua, northern Italy, was acquitted on criminal charges of failing to pay child support after a judge ruled that he had done his best during hard times to provide €400 worth of pizzas, calzone and other goods from the takeaway pizza place where he worked.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by drunkenninja
    +47 +8

    A Nobel Prize winner in economics just backed basic income

    Basic income is having a whirlwind year, and it was just galvanized even further by the support of Angus Deaton, the 2015 Nobel Prize winner for Economics.At a universal basic income forum in Taiwan's capital on May 19, Deaton encouraged governments to consider lifting the financial burden on low-income citizens with basic income grants, the Taipei Times reports. He pointed to increasing instability as a cause for concern. "The riskier the world becomes, the more potential there is for increases in inequality," he said.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by socialiguana
    +32 +10

    How a good night's sleep became the ultimate status symbol

    Sleep deprivation used to be a badge of honor: a sign you were busy and important and very much in demand. Snoozing was losing and sleep was for wimps. Now, however, Arianna Huffington’s The Sleep Revolution, a call-to-bed that promises to transform your life, “one night at a time”, is a New York Times bestseller, and Huffington is crisscrossing the country urging people to “sleep their way to the top”. Meanwhile, the sleep industry has woken up big time and a slew of startups are reinventing where...

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by junglman
    +29 +7

    This amazing Bangladeshi air cooler is made from plastic bottles and uses no electricity

    Summer is upon us, and complaints about the heat will soon be common in many places. But few places will reach the scorching temperatures residents of Bangladesh will experience, and air conditioning is simply not an option for most people living in rural areas. Ashis Paul developed a clever DIY cooling system that doesn’t need any electricity and is built from a common waste item: empty plastic soda bottles. In just three months, Paul’s company has helped install its smart powerless air conditioners, called Eco Coolers, in 25,000 households, with many more still ahead.

  • Analysis
    1 year ago
    by aj0690
    +33 +8

    United States of Paranoia: They See Gangs of Stalkers

    Nobody believed him. His family told him to get help. But Timothy Trespas, an out-of-work recording engineer in his early 40s, was sure he was being stalked, and not by just one person, but dozens of them. He would see the operatives, he said, disguised as ordinary people, lurking around his Midtown Manhattan neighborhood. Sometimes they bumped into him and whispered nonsense into his ear, he said. “Now you see how it works,” they would say.

  • Expression
    1 year ago
    by doodlegirl
    +32 +10

    Why even driving through suburbia is soul crushing

    I’ve written some in the past about how the predominant suburban design in the US is among the worst features of life here—viewed from the perspective of a European immigrant like me, at any rate. Far from posing a mere logistical or aesthetic problem, it shapes–or perhaps more accurately, it circumscribes–our experience of life and our social relationships in insidious ways. The destruction of the pedestrian public realm is not merely an economic or ecological absurdity; it has real deleterious effects.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by Pfennig88
    +36 +8

    As Tech Evaporates Jobs, "The Tipping Point Will Be Driverless Trucks"

    Driverless vehicles "will make what happened in the steel or auto industries look tiny," says the former chief of one of America's largest unions. It was the free pizza that led Andy Stern to his first union meeting, back when he was working as a welfare caseworker in the 1970’s. He rose fast through the ranks, eventually claiming one of the most powerful positions in the labor movement: President of the 2.2-million member Service Employees International Union.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by hxxp
    +43 +7

    Venezuelans Ransack Stores as Hunger Grips the Nation

    With delivery trucks under constant attack, the nation’s food is now transported under armed guard. Soldiers stand watch over bakeries. The police fire rubber bullets at desperate mobs storming grocery stores, pharmacies and butcher shops. A 4-year-old girl was shot to death as street gangs fought over food. Venezuela is convulsing from hunger. Hundreds of people here in the city of Cumaná, home to one of the region’s independence heroes...

  • Analysis
    1 year ago
    by rhingo
    +34 +9

    Being Rich Doesn't Mean You're More Hardworking: Economist Says Markets Amplify Luck

    Why do hardworking people with similar talents and training often earn such dramatically different incomes? And why, too, have these earnings gaps grown so much larger in recent decades? Almost no other questions have proved more enduringly fascinating to economists. The traditional approach to these questions views labor markets as perfectly competitive meritocracies in which people are paid in accordance with the value of what they produce. In this view, earnings differences result largely from individual differences...

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by junglman
    +32 +6

    Rent affordability: 11 million Americans spend half their income on rent

    More Americans are struggling to make rent. The number of renters dedicating at least half of their income toward housing hit a record high of 11 million people in 2014, according to the annual State of the Nation's Housing Report from the Joint Center for Housing Studies of Harvard University. A total of 21.3 million are spending 30% or more of their paycheck to cover the rent -- also a record high. Personal finance experts generally suggest budgeting around 30% of monthly income to cover housing costs.