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What is the biggest culture shock you have ever experienced?

3 years ago by canuck with 6 comments

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  • Nospine (edited 3 years ago)
    +5

    Probably when I lived in the UAE.

    There are many things that seemed weird for someone coming from a very conservative country at the time (in today's world this is all normal, I know), such as men holding hands (they do it as a sign of friendship) as well as men kissing each other on the cheek as a greeting (again, friendship). I really didn't like that men could hug/kiss/hold hands with each other, but men and women couldn't do that (you get a fine or prison time if you do). Both genders were also separated at school by a huge wall in the playground (most schools did that, or they had completely separate areas), which also didn't feel right.

    But what was the most terrible thing I saw was that most older women (40 and up) usually wear what I liked to call a "dog muzzle'. It was a very odd device made out of brass if I'm not mistaken, uncannily similar to a muzzle, and it really freaked me out seeing women wearing that. The worst part is that they had this arabic cartoon over there which depicted a small girl wearing that muzzle, almost as if to tell kids that it was an alright thing to have and wear (of course it's alright according to their culture, but in my eyes it almost looks like they have their freedom taken away)

    • ishana
      +1

      I think what you are talking about is something called "Niqab".

      All of the things you find weird I find completely normal, UAE is a part of the middle east and it is an Islamic country we all are pretty much the same I guess.

      • Nospine
        +2

        Oh no, it's definitely not that. What I'm talking about is some sort of brass/metallic contraption that women had on their face. I got used to the niqab pretty quickly, but on the other hand, seeing that contraption on women's faces was not very easy to get used to.

    • Nelson
      +1

      The UAE is a strange land.

  • AinBaya
    +3

    Israeli's generally are very forward with you, they tend to shout a lot and aren't very patient at all. They'll come across as very rude, arrogant and just plain idiodic sometimes but most of them are just used to a very fast paced society. Also the lines on the roads, speed signs and lights are really just suggestions in Israel.

  • ishana
    +1

    My culture shock was leaving the middle east and going other countries.

    I been to Turkey twice and as an Egyptian myself it feels like home , people are so nice , welcoming, and they don't treat you differently . My shock was that to me they are so open minded that it freaked me out at first.

    Turkey felt at that time like everyone was naked, Nightclubs are like cloth shops they are everywhere and they try to lure you in, In my perspective weather was like living in a freezer (-3 Celsius) .

    I have to say I like Turkey the most of all countries I visited, but as an experience it was my first ever trip outside the country and it was my first culture shock as well.