LOUNGE all new asksnapzu ideasforsnapzu newtribes interesting pics videos funny technology science technews gaming health history worldnews business web research entertainment food living internet socialmedia mobile space sports photography nature animals movies culture travel television finance music celebrities gadgets environment usa crime politics law money justice psychology security cars wtf art google books lifetips bigbrother women apple kids recipes whoa military privacy education facebook medicine computing wildlife design war drugs middleeast diet toplists economy fail violence humor africa microsoft parenting dogs canada neuroscience architecture religion advertising infographics sex journalism disaster software aviation relationships energy booze life japan ukraine newmovies nsa cannabis name Name of the tribe humanrights nasa cute weather gifs discoveries cops futurism football earth dataviz pets guns entrepreneurship fitness android extremeweather fashion insects india northamerica

Urmel's feed

  • 3 years ago
    Achievement Urmel

    Good Image

    Reached a reputation rating of 70%. Congratulations Urmel on this achievement!

    +6160 XP
  • 3 years ago
    Related Link Urmel

    The Mind-Bending Science of Awe

    Urmel added 1 related link(s)

    There are a total of 1 items in the related links
  • 3 years ago
    Related Link Urmel

    The simplest way to get — and stay — happy, according to psychologists

    Urmel added 3 related link(s)

    There are a total of 3 items in the related links
  • 3 years ago
    Analysis Urmel

    The simplest way to get — and stay — happy, according to psychologists

    Researchers estimate that between 30% and 60% of our happiness is out of our control. Here's what to do about that remaining percentage.

  • 3 years ago
    Comment Urmel

    I am not sure, if I can agree completely with the article's statement, with the advent of the internet and Facebook we would experience something completely new than our great-grandparents.

    While it is true, that the internet and platforms like Facebook bring in a new component of how we experience death that our parents, grand- and great grandparents haven't experienced, our society also went through a shift since the times of previous generations. I think, the onset of these new technologies and the hypothesis mentioned in the article might allow us to experience death in a way again that is more comparable to our ancestors' experience.

    Points that I consider comparable:

    - In older times, people moved less and stayed more within the area they grew up in. Family clans, people "we" went to school with - People moved less than today, meaning over the course of someone's life we would learn of more and more old friends and family members passing by the word of mouth, church congregations or obituaries in the local paper just as we would learn today via Facebook of friends and extended family members on the other side of the country, continent or globe.

    - There are more people alive at the same time than in the past and lots of these people are concentrated in smaller areas than in the past. While we sometimes still can find old cemeteries with grave stones going back to the 1800's and early 1900s they are more and more rare unless they are family owned or protected for cultural preservative reasons. Lots of cemeteries only offer the options to "rent' a lot for a passed family member with an expiration date that can still be well in our life times (e.g. only 20 years). Some offer the options to renew the lease for that lot, others do not. The lot will be emptied, the remains and individualized grave markers removed. I think this is kind of comparable to the experience of a growing dead "user"-base on social platforms or their demise (Myspace, geoscity, etc.)

    While there are other challenges and experiences due to the nature of the technological medium, I still think, it is less a question of "how we think about death" or even experience it in a fundamental way, but more a question of how technology led to a shift that allows us to experience said experience closer to how our ancestors experienced death.

    Interesting article!

    Edit: Clarification in second paragraph.

    show moreshow less
  • 3 years ago
    Comment Urmel

    This is an incredibly inspiring story about a man who wants to make the best out of life without being inhibited by his past experience that would have others turned bitter - and incredibly sad that he could enjoy it only for such a short time.

    I feel for his family who lost him twice now.