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  • Analysis
    6 days ago
    by TNY
    +23 +6

    Millennials are falling behind their boomer parents (warning: autoplay video)

    With a median household income of $40,581, millennials earn 20 percent less than boomers did at the same stage of life, despite being better educated, according to a new analysis of Federal Reserve data by the advocacy group Young Invincibles. The analysis being released Friday gives concrete details about a troubling generational divide that helps to explain much of the anxiety that defined the 2016 election. Millennials have half the net worth of boomers. Their home ownership rate is lower, while their student debt is drastically higher.

  • Current Event
    5 days ago
    by gottlieb
    +17 +3

    Colombia Kidnappings Down 92% Since 2000

    According to Colombian police officials, the number of people kidnapped in their nation has fallen by 92% since 2000. The country used to be considered one of the most popular zones for kidnapping in the world, with an estimated 30,000 people captured since 1970. Thanks to the recent peace deal between the rebels of The Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia People’s Army and the government, thus ending their 52 year war, only about 188 people were kidnapped in 2016, showing historic new progress.

  • Analysis
    12 days ago
    by Apolatia
    +32 +7

    Facebook lurking makes you miserable, says study

    Too much Facebook browsing at Christmas - and seeing all those "perfect" families and holiday photos - is more likely to make you miserable than festive, research suggests. A University of Copenhagen study suggests excessive use of social media can create feelings of envy. It particularly warns about the negative impact of "lurking" on social media without connecting with anyone. The study suggests taking a break from using social media.

  • Current Event
    2 weeks ago
    by messi
    +33 +9

    U.S. income inequality, on rise for decades, is now highest since 1928

    President Obama took on a topic yesterday that most Americans don’t like to talk about much: inequality. There are a lot of ways to measure economic inequality (and we’ll be discussing more on Fact Tank), but one basic approach is to look at how much income flows to groups at different steps on the economic ladder. Emmanuel Saez, an economics professor at UC-Berkeley, has been doing just that for years. And according to his research, U.S. income inequality has been increasing steadily since the 1970s, and now has reached levels not seen since 1928.

  • Expression
    2 weeks ago
    by drunkenninja
    +32 +7

    Your Life in Weeks

    All the weeks in a human life shown on one chart. Sometimes life seems really short, and other times it seems impossibly long. But this chart helps to emphasize that it’s most certainly finite. Those are your weeks and they’re all you’ve got. Given that fact, the only appropriate word to describe your weeks is precious. There are trillions upon trillions of weeks in eternity, and those are your tiny handful. Going with the “precious” theme, let’s imagine that each of your weeks is a small gem, like a 2mm, .05 carat diamond.

  • Current Event
    2 weeks ago
    by funhonestdude
    +41 +7

    Take It From A German: Americans Are Too Timid In Confronting Hate

    In Germany, we were taught over and over again that Hitler came to power because ordinary people were afraid to stand up and speak out. Americans could stand to learn that lesson now.

  • Current Event
    2 weeks ago
    by zyery
    +30 +7

    Saving New Zealand's murder capital: 'We don't want to be defined by death'

    Ringed by golden beaches and temperate Pacific seas, Kaitaia is unconscionably pretty, dotted with flaming red pohutukawa trees and blessed by year-round blue skies. The town of 5,000 people on the northern tip of New Zealand’s North Island should be known as a holiday resort, but instead it has been dubbed the murder capital of New Zealand after four homicides and six suicides in a single year.

  • Expression
    3 weeks ago
    by Chubros
    +28 +11

    Can a Gun Victim and a Gun Advocate Change Each Other’s Minds?

    On his recent trip to New York, Todd Underwood did not pack a gun. This was unusual, the first time in five years that he went anywhere, even to church, without one. Underwood, who is 37 years old and from Kansas City, won’t say how many guns he owns, but “a fucking arsenal” is a fair description. Underwood wasn’t always a gun guy, he told me, though his father, a factory worker, kept a revolver or two under the bed. His interest really took hold in February 2014, when he was laid up, recovering from quadruple-­bypass surgery, with an infant daughter at home.

  • Current Event
    2 weeks ago
    by socialiguana
    +24 +6

    Any way you calculate it, income inequality is getting worse

    A flurry of new reports have provided yet more data demonstrating that inequality is getting worse. All right, this does not qualify as a shock. But it really isn’t your imagination. The economic crisis, nearly a decade on now, has been global in scope — working people most everywhere continue to suffer while the one percent are doing just fine. One measure of this is wages.

  • How-to
    2 weeks ago
    by AdelleChattre
    +24 +6

    How to Become a ‘Superager’

    Sudoku isn’t enough. You have to push yourself.

  • Current Event
    8 days ago
    by ubthejudge
    +6 +2

    Undercover probe exposes property firm overcrowding houses with up to 70 people - 'House could have burned to the ground'

    A PROPERTY management company in Dublin is renting a number of houses across the capital to up to 70 people at a time, with up to 15 people in some rooms, Independent.ie can reveal. The owner of two properties implicated said he leases the houses to the company and allows them "to do what they like with them", insisting "there’s no breach of regulations".

  • Analysis
    3 weeks ago
    by gladsdotter
    +29 +8

    Why people get happier as they get older

    As people age, they gain what they spend their lives pursuing: happiness

  • Image
    3 weeks ago
    by jcscher
    +19 +6

    In Pictures: Twelve months, Twelve Frames

    The best images of 2016 by Getty Images photographers as selected by Hugh Pinney.

  • Analysis
    3 weeks ago
    by tranxene
    +43 +6

    Charles Bukowski wrote this letter about quitting the 9 to 5 Life, 30 years later it’s more relevant than ever.

    As a young man I could not believe that people could give their lives over to those conditions. As an old man, I still can’t believe it. What do they do it for? Sex? TV? An automobile on monthly payments? Or children? Children who are just going to do the same things that they did?

  • Analysis
    1 month ago
    by Apolatia
    +37 +9

    100 CEOs Have as Much Retirement Savings as 116 Million Americans - Monetary Watch

    While many Americans are facing a “frightening retirement reality,” 100 CEOs are looking at “colossal nest eggs” and can look forward to monthly retirement checks of over $250,000 for the rest of their lives. The Institute for Policy Studies (IPS) puts a spotlight on this massive savings gap in its newreport (pdf), “A Tale of Two Retirements.”

  • Unspecified
    1 month ago
    by everlost
    +44 +11

    Banning Smoking in Public Housing is Just Another Experiment on the Poor

    It is understandable, given everything else going on, that there has not been much controversy around the Department of Housing and Urban Development’s (HUD) new plan to ban smoking in all public housing. And after all, why should there be controversy? Liberals like the smoking ban because it’s a public health initiative, and keeps children from getting asthma. Conservatives couldn’t care less about some new public housing regulation. Banning smoking in housing projects is a plan everyone can be happy with.

  • Analysis
    1 month ago
    by Nelson
    +31 +6

    Robots will take our jobs – but that's good for the future of civilisation

    The next time you're standing at a busy junction, look around and count how many people you can see driving for a living. Tot them up – bus drivers, van drivers, Amazon deliverymen, Ubers, black cabs, hauliers – and you're looking at the single biggest sector of our economy. Yet, in another decade or so, almost all these men – they're mainly men – will be out of work, displaced by driverless cars and delivery drones.

  • Current Event
    3 weeks ago
    by Petrox
    +23 +4

    People who don't have children benefit our environment more than any campaign

    The global population is growing rapidly, while the resources we depend on to live are dwindling. If you consider the footprint each person makes on the world – in terms of food and water consumed, electricity and gas used, and waste produced – the challenge of improving living standards while protecting natural resources and the environment is striking. The question of human population size is fundamentally one of sustainability, and in that so is the choice to have children.

  • Current Event
    2 weeks ago
    by geoleo
    +25 +3

    ‘It’s really embarrassing and gross for them’

    A MELBOURNE landlord has been blasted online after a tenant revealed he had installed a coin-operated toilet in the house, requiring the tenants to pay per flush. That’s right, the stingy landlord and owner of an apartment property in Thornbury has reportedly equipped the toilet with a mechanism that means residents have to pay $1 to flush the dunny. Unsure about the legality of such a contraption, the tenant posted the story on forum-based social media website reddit to ask the community if the landlord was allowed to do this.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by belangermira
    +38 +12

    Amazon unveils ‘self-driving’ brick-and-mortar convenience store

    The 1,800-square-foot store, dubbed “Amazon Go,” is the latest beach in brick-and-mortar retail stormed by the e-commerce giant. It’s clearly a sign Amazon sees a big opportunity in revolutionizing Main Street commerce.

  • Analysis
    1 month ago
    by gladsdotter
    +32 +9

    What would it take to make an age-friendly city?

    Planned, multi-generational communities might be great for those who can afford them. The rest of us need cities better equipped for older people.

  • Analysis
    1 month ago
    by geoleo
    +31 +8

    The Libertarian Utopia That’s Just a Bunch of White Guys on a Tiny Island

    With some luck, Liberland, the unrecognized three-square-mile territory on the Western bank of the Danube, might one day become the Libertarian utopia for disaffected white men.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by takai
    +20 +6

    Mental health and relationships 'key to happiness'

    Good mental health and having a partner make people happier than doubling their income, a new study has found. The research by the London School of Economics looked at responses from 200,000 people on how different factors impacted their wellbeing. Suffering from depression or anxiety hit individuals hardest, whilst being in a relationship saw the biggest increase in their happiness. The study's co-author said the findings demanded "a new role from the state".

  • Analysis
    1 month ago
    by wildcat
    +29 +7

    Why Minimum Wage Hikes Work, in 3 Charts

    The biggest argument against raising the minimum wage is that it’s going to end up cutting jobs. By having to pay each worker extra, the cost of producing goods or services will increase. So, the argument goes, employers will either pass that cost off to customers (by raising prices) or try to find savings elsewhere (by investing in equipment rather than workers, or reducing the hours their employees work). Either way, the total demand for labor will drop.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by geoleo
    +35 +12

    A day in the life of a care worker: 23 house calls in 12 hours for £64.80

    It’s 6.30am and still dark, and Jean is setting out for her job as a home care worker. When she returns in 12 hours’ time she will have made 23 house calls to sick and elderly people, driven 20 miles between appointments and earned £64.80 before tax. Jean isn’t her real name. Along with fellow care workers in this northern town she is on a zero-hours contract and fears losing work if her employer is unhappy with her. She fears that speaking out about how she has to race between visits, cutting short her appointments in order to earn the “national living wage”, might result in an immediate loss of earnings.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by socialiguana
    +27 +5

    A Job Is More Than a Paycheck

    In the aftermath of the 2016 presidential election, I’m starting to rethink one of my basic beliefs about the economy. For a long time, I’ve believed that what mattered most for economic well-being was money. Median income, consumption, wages -- all the things I cared about most were measured in dollars. Because of this attitude, I’ve supported lots of policies aimed at boosting the amount of money in the average person’s pocket.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by geoleo
    +20 +7

    Why Living Near Water is Good For Your Mind

    As someone healing from debilitating postpartum depression and anxiety, I've come to realize that a short walk near the ocean, a lake, or even a reservoir calms my anxious mind. In the cities where I've lived—New York City and Singapore—I have never been more than a few minutes from a river or a strait or a harbor, and I turn to them often in times of distress.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by aj0690
    +41 +5

    Amazon workers sleeping in tents near Dunfermline site

    At least three tents have been spotted in woodland beside the online retail giant’s base just off the M90 in Dunfermline in recent days, sparking concerns about the depths some employees are apparently plumbing to hold down a job.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by lexi6
    +22 +8

    This Tiny Home Grows With The Push Of A Button

    Love the idea of a tiny home, but not the tiny square-footage? ZeroSquared, a Calgary-based company, has come up with tiny home model that is flipping the script on tiny home living — with only one touch of a button. The Aurora tiny home will expand using motorized slide-outs, immediately creating more living space. In fact, the home will almost double in width — going from 8.6 feet to 15.1 feet wide and offering a total 337 sq.-ft. of living space.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by grandtheftsoul
    +26 +7

    Taiwan set to legalize same-sex marriages, a first in Asia

    Su Shan and her partner are raising 5-month-old twins together, but only one of the women is their legal parent. That could soon change as Taiwan appears set to become the first place in Asia to legalize same-sex marriage. "Now, if something happens to the child, the other partner is nothing but a stranger," said Su, a 35-year-old software engineer in Taipei. By contrast, either partner in a legally recognized marriage could make legal, medical and educational decisions, she says.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by funhonestdude
    +39 +11

    Shani Shingnapur: The Village Without Doors

    About 300 km east of Mumbai, in the remote Indian village of Shani Shingnapur, crime is a concept so alien that villagers here have stopped guarding their houses, their properties and their valuables. Nobody locks their cars and motorbikes anymore. Shopkeepers leave cash in unlocked drawers overnight, and housewives keep jewelry in unlocked boxes, inside houses that have no doors —just a wooden door frame with a curtain drawn across to protect the privacy of the residents.

  • Analysis
    2 months ago
    by zyery
    +34 +7

    Why South Korea predicts its end will come in 2750

    South Korea may be doomed. A recent study, conducted by the National Assembly Research Service in Seoul, predicts that the country will reach zero inhabitants by 2750. The report makes it clear where the country's problem lies: A remarkably low birth rate of 1.19 children per woman. But what's really striking is the speed at which it could happen: South Korea's population (currently larger than Spain) could shrink to a level comparable to tiny Switzerland within only a few generations.

  • Video
    2 months ago
    by rti9
    +21 +6

    Muslim NYPD chaplain: saluted in uniform, harassed as a civilian

    Khalid Latif's reality in a post-9/11 world.

  • Analysis
    2 months ago
    by wildcat
    +33 +7

    Record 40% of Japanese sleep less than six hours a day

    A record 39.5 percent of Japanese get less than six hours of sleep a day, according to an annual health ministry survey. Male respondents attributed their short sleep time to their job and health, while women cited housework and their job, the 2015 National Health and Nutrition Survey found. The survey also highlighted the risk of exposure to secondhand smoke in restaurants and workplaces — which remains high despite the government’s aim of meeting global standards ahead of the 2020 Tokyo Olympics.

  • Analysis
    2 months ago
    by zyery
    +35 +7

    Inside the world of Australian opal miners who live underground

    Photographer Tamara Merino and her boyfriend were driving through the desert in Australia in November 2015 when they started to see a few odd signs: “Underground bar,” then “underground restaurant.” After they got a flat tire, they found an underground church — empty, but lit by a few flickering candles. They had stumbled into the city of Coober Pedy, a partly subterranean community and the opal capital of the world. The town’s name comes from the Aboriginal phrase “kupa piti,” or, roughly, “white man’s hole.”