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  • Current Event
    6 months ago
    by dianep
    +13 +4

    This ‘cannonball’ pulsar is racing at escape speed across the Milky W

    Astronomers discovered a pulsar, a kind of zombie star, racing across the galaxy so quickly that it could get from Earth to the Moon in six minutes flat. The dead star has a tail pointing back toward the remnant of a supernova that exploded 10,000 years ago. Astronomers suspected this might have provided the kick that sent the pulsar speeding off, but had to wait for 10 years of telescope data to make their case convincing.

  • Current Event
    5 months ago
    by darvinhg
    +18 +4

    The Universe's Dark Secret: Where Did All the Antimatter Go?

    Paul M. Sutter is an astrophysicist at The Ohio State University, host of Ask a Spaceman and Space Radio, and author of Your Place in the Universe. Sutter contributed this article to Space.com's Expert Voices: Op-Ed & Insights. So there's this stuff called "antimatter." You may have heard of it. It's just like normal matter, with all the same properties and all the same abilities to make up atoms and molecules, except for one crucial difference: It has an opposite charge. Take the humble electron, for example. Mass of 9.11 x 10^-31 kg. Quantum spin of 1/2. Charge of -1.6 x 10^-9 coulombs.

  • Current Event
    5 months ago
    by jasont
    +14 +3

    Scientists weighed all the mass in the Milky Way galaxy. It’s mind-boggling.

    Something weird is happening in our galaxy: It’s spinning fast enough that stars ought to be flying off, but there’s something holding them together. The substance that acts as a gravitational glue is dark matter. Yet it’s incredibly mysterious: Because it doesn’t emit light, no one has ever directly seen it. And no one knows what it’s made of, though there are plenty of wild hypotheses.

  • Current Event
    5 months ago
    by zyery
    +18 +3

    In astrophysics milestone, first photo of black hole expected

    Scientists are expected to unveil on Wednesday the first-ever photograph of a black hole, a breakthrough in astrophysics providing insight into celestial monsters with gravitational fields so intense no matter or light can escape. The U.S. National Science Foundation has scheduled a news conference in Washington to announce a “groundbreaking result from the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) project,” an international partnership formed in 2012 to try to directly observe the immediate environment of a black hole.

  • Current Event
    5 months ago
    by TNY
    +21 +5

    Event Horizon Telescope saw a black hole. It could change everything

    Black holes are some of the most intriguing and mysterious objects in the universe, inspiring entire libraries of both scientific research and science fiction, from Einstein to the movie Interstellar. Yet despite the hold their inconceivable gravity has on our imaginations, as well as our understanding of physics, humans have never actually seen a black hole.

  • Current Event
    5 months ago
    by Maternitus
    +58 +7

    Black hole picture captured for first time in space ‘breakthrough’

    A network of eight radio telescopes around the world helped to record the image

  • Current Event
    5 months ago
    by zyery
    +27 +4

    Are we living in a computer simulation? I don’t know. Probably.

    Are we living in a computer simulation? The question seems absurd. Yet there are plenty of smart people who are convinced that this is not only possible but perhaps likely. In an influential paper that laid out the theory, the Oxford philosopher Nick Bostrom showed that at least one of three possibilities is true: 1) All human-like civilizations in the universe go extinct before they develop the technological capacity to create simulated realities; 2) if any civilizations do reach this phase of technological maturity, none of them will bother to run simulations; or 3...

  • Current Event
    5 months ago
    by TentativePrince
    +28 +4

    Professor Stephen Hawking's final theory: The universe is a hologram

    tephen Hawking has revealed from beyond the grave his final scientific theory - that the universe is a hologram. The cosmologist, who died on March 14, has challenged previous theories of cosmic "inflation" and the "multiverse" in a new paper published in the Journal Of High Energy Physics. Scientists generally believe that for a tiny fraction of a second after the Big Bang, the universe expanded incredibly rapidly before settling into its present state, filled with stars and galaxies - the inflation theory.

  • Current Event
    5 months ago
    by bradd
    +26 +9

    Third planet found hiding in ‘Tatooine’ star system

    Like the planet Tatooine from Star Wars, two suns — one bright, one dim and red— rise over the horizon of Kepler 47d. But unlike dry and sandy Tatooine, this planet’s surface is gassy and indistinct. The system also holds two smaller planets; one planet closer to the double suns, and one farther out. Both lack a solid surface. If you visited in a spaceship, all the planets would be easy to spot because they’re packed, along with their stars, into a space smaller than Earth’s orbit around the Sun.

  • Current Event
    5 months ago
    by kong88
    +30 +4

    Astronomers find oldest type of molecule in space

    Everything has a beginning. That’s true for stories, for people, for the universe and even for chemistry. The Big Bang itself produced just a handful of elements (variations of hydrogen, helium and lithium nuclei), so researchers have a pretty good sense of what the first atoms and molecules might have been. But the very first molecular bond to form, linking together atoms of different elements in a single molecule, has long been missing in action.

  • Image
    5 months ago
    by zyery
    +20 +4

    Happy birthday, Hubble! To celebrate-a spectacular image of the Southern Crab Nebula

    NASA and ESA celebrate the 29th Birthday of the Hubble space telescope on 24th April 2019 with a stunning image of the Southern Crab Nebula.

  • Analysis
    4 months ago
    by spacepopper
    +16 +5

    The universe is expanding faster than we thought, and no one knows why

    Explaining a discrepancy between what was happening 13 billion years ago and now may require new physics.

  • Current Event
    4 months ago
    by bradd
    +13 +2

    What gravitational waves can say about dark matter

    In 1916, Albert Einstein published his theory of general relativity, which established the modern view of gravity as a warping of the fabric of spacetime. The theory predicted that objects that interact with gravity could disturb that fabric, sending ripples across it. Any object that interacts with gravity can create gravitational waves. But only the most catastrophic cosmic events make gravitational waves powerful enough for us to detect.

  • Current Event
    4 months ago
    by distant
    +6 +2

    Astronomers watch as a black hole's jet wobbles like a top

    Back in 2015, the black hole V404 Cygni got the attention of astronomers all over the globe when it suddenly brightened for two weeks. The outburst happened as the black hole began gobbling up material from a star that orbits it once every six days. As the material swirled into the black hole, it heated up enough to glow brightly. Then, the black hole starting shooting some of that material far out into space as bright jet beams. When astronomers took a close look at the jets, they realized they were wobbling like a top.

  • Current Event
    4 months ago
    by TentativePrince
    +10 +2

    Hubble reveals soul-wrenching view of the distant universe

    Look at this and you can see 265,000 galaxies reaching back across 13.3 billion years. It took 7,500 exposures from the Hubble Space Telescope to make this mosaic of the distant universe called the Hubble Legacy Field. Take a moment and feel the awe. The Legacy Field follows a succession of Hubble images that have captured more and more previously unseen galaxies. This new view combines observations from several Hubble deep-field surveys taken across 16 years.

  • Current Event
    4 months ago
    by geoleo
    +27 +3

    This award-winning video reveals the most astounding Hubble images of our universe

    Get ready for an epic journey through the cosmos. This film won "Best Short Film" of 2004, and it's no wonder why. The Hubble Space Telescope has revolutionized our perspective on the number of galaxies, stars, and planets in our universe. And you can experience its most astounding images in this award-winning film.

  • Current Event
    4 months ago
    by messi
    +10 +4

    Theorist calculates the incalculable siren song of merging black holes

    Just a month into a renewed observing campaign with a trio of detectors, physicists today announced they have spotted more gravitational waves—fleeting ripples in space set off when two massive objects such as black holes spiral into each other. The collaboration has now bagged 13 merging black hole pairs, as well as two pairs of neutron stars. But even as detections accumulate, one theorist has made an advance that could change how the team analyzes the signals and make it easier to test Albert Einstein’s theory of gravity, general relativity.

  • Analysis
    3 months ago
    by Amabaie
    +32 +8

    A Physicist Has Proposed a Pretty Depressing Explanation For Why We Never See Aliens

    The Universe is so unimaginably big, and it's positively teeming with an almost infinite supply of potentially life-giving worlds. So where the heck is everybody?

  • Analysis
    3 months ago
    by TheSpirit
    +20 +4

    Earth's Heavy Metals Result of Supernova Explosion, U of G Researcher Discovers

    That gold on your ring finger is stellar – and not just in a complimentary way. In a finding that may overthrow our understanding of where Earth’s heavy elements such as gold and platinum come from, new research by a University of Guelph physicist suggests that most of them were spewed from a lar

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by doodlegirl
    +32 +3

    World’s first AI universe simulator knows things it shouldn’t

    Since we can’t travel billions of years back in time — not yet, anyways — one of the best ways to understand how our universe evolved is to create computer simulations of the process using what we do know about it. Most of those simulations fall into one of two categories: slow and more accurate, or fast and less accurate. But now, an international team of researchers has built an AI that can quickly generate highly-accurate, three-dimensional simulations of the universe — even when they tweak parameters the system wasn’t trained on.