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  • Current Event
    3 weeks ago
    by jedlicka
    +17 +4

    Bacteria that consumes CO2 has been discovered at the bottom of the Pacific Ocean

    Bacteria that absorbs carbon dioxide (CO2) and potentially turns itself into a food source for other sea creatures has been discovered in one of the deepest parts of the Pacific Ocean. Scientists were studying the ecosystems in the Clarion-Clipperton Fracture Zone (CCFZ), a trench that extends 2.5 miles beneath the surface of the ocean. The area is currently being explored for its deep sea mining potential—contractors from nations including Korea, Germany and the U.K. believe the site to be a promising source of polymetallic nodules, which contain metals like nickel, copper and cobalt.

  • Current Event
    3 weeks ago
    by jasont
    +18 +4

    Scientists may have found a way to treat cancer without chemotherapy by replicating our body's own self-destruct system

    Every day, millions of cells in our bodies "kill themselves" and are quickly removed. While the mechanism may sound melodramatic, in reality it's for our own good. This is because the process ensures potentially harmful cells destroy themselves and, as a consequence, we're protected from disease.

  • Analysis
    3 weeks ago
    by Apolatia
    +31 +4

    How to Control a Machine with Your Brain

    A neuroscientist’s research into the mysteries of motion helps a paralyzed woman escape her body.

  • Current Event
    3 weeks ago
    by LisMan
    +25 +3

    U.S. Climate Report Warns of Damaged Environment and Shrinking Economy

    Without major action to rein in global warming, the American economy could lose 10 percent of G.D.P. by 2100, according to a report from 13 federal agencies.

  • Current Event
    2 weeks ago
    by jasont
    +12 +3

    The Chinese scientist who claims he made CRISPR babies has been suspended without pay

    A Chinese researcher who claims to have created the first gene-edited babies, He Jiankui of the Southern University of Science and Technology (SUST), in Shenzhen, is now facing investigation over whether the experiment broke Chinese laws or regulations. On Sunday, MIT Technology Review was first to disclose a secretive project in China to produce children whose genomes had been modified to make them resistant to HIV.

  • Analysis
    2 weeks ago
    by grandtheftsoul
    +23 +2

    Physics can explain the fastball’s unexpected twist, new study finds

    Pitches vary as a result of different spin speed, spin axis, ball orientation.

  • Current Event
    2 weeks ago
    by doodlegirl
    +12 +2

    NUS researchers turn plastic bottle waste into ultralight supermaterial with wide-ranging applications

    World’s first PET aerogels cut plastic waste, and are suitable for heat and sound insulation, oil spill cleaning, carbon dioxide absorption, as well as fire safety applications. Researchers from the the National University of Singapore (NUS) have made a significant contribution towards resolving the global issue of plastic waste, by creating a way to convert plastic bottle waste into aerogels for many useful applications.

  • Analysis
    2 weeks ago
    by messi
    +13 +2

    Last four years are 'world's hottest'

    The year 2018 is on course to be the fourth warmest on record, according to the World Meteorological Organization. It says that the global average temperature for the first 10 months of the year was nearly 1C above the levels between 1850-1900. The State of the Climate report says that the 20 warmest years on record have been in the past 22 years, with the 2015-2018 making up the top four.

  • Current Event
    9 days ago
    by ubthejudge
    +3 +1

    Earth’s magnetic poles could start to flip. What happens then?

    As Earth's magnetic shield fails, so do its satellites. First, our communications satellites in the highest orbits go down. Next, astronauts in low-Earth orbit can no longer phone home. And finally, cosmic rays start to bombard every human on Earth. This is a possibility that we may start to face not in the next million years, not in the next thousand, but in the next hundred. If Earth’s magnetic field were to decay significantly, it could collapse altogether and flip polarity – changing magnetic north to south and vice versa. The consequences of this process could be dire for our planet.

  • Analysis
    1 month ago
    by iamsanchez
    +35 +9

    Meet the Endoterrestrials

    They live thousands of feet below the Earth’s surface. They eat hydrogen and exhale methane. And they may shape our world more profoundly than we can imagine.

  • Analysis
    1 month ago
    by gottlieb
    +12 +4

    Ancient genomics is recasting the story of the Americas’ first residents

    Trove of DNA from prehistoric inhabitants reveals that the continents’ early settlers moved far and fast.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by grandsalami
    +28 +6

    People are “consistently inconsistent” in how they reason about controversial scientific topics

    There are various issues on which there is a scientific consensus but great public controversy, such as anthropogenic climate change and the safety of vaccines. One previously popular explanation for this mismatch was that an information deficit among the public is to blame. Give people all the facts and then, according to this perspective, the public will catch up with the scientists. Yet time and again, that simply hasn’t happened.

  • Analysis
    1 month ago
    by iamsanchez
    +35 +4

    How plants evolved to make ants their servants

    Plants are boring. They just sit there photosynthesizing while animals have all the fun. Right? Not so much. Take a look at the interactions between ants and plants—plants have evolved features specifically to make them enticing to ants, like juicy nectar for the insects to eat and hollow thorns for them to take shelter in. In exchange, plants use ants to spread their seeds and even act as bodyguards.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by ppp
    +13 +5

    Why we’re killing the kilogram for a new one

    Nearly every measurement of weight you’ve ever made, from peeking at your bathroom scale to measuring out flour for a recipe, can be traced back to just a single object: a metal kilogram made of platinum and iridium that resides under lock and key in an underground vault in Paris. It’s called the International Prototype Kilogram, or IPK, and since its creation in 1889 it has been the standard by which the world’s weights are defined. But not for much longer.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by TNY
    +15 +5

    Maybe Next Time: Barnard’s Star B is Likely Uninhabitable

    Put on your friendliest face and say hello to the newest member of our planetary neighborhood: Barnard’s star b. An international team led by researchers from the Carnegie Institution for Science announced today that they’ve detected an exoplanet orbiting Barnard’s star, the closest single star to Earth at just six light-years away. The astronomers calculate the newfound world, dubbed Barnard’s star b, to be about 3.2 times the mass of Earth and to orbit its host star once every 233 days.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by Nelson
    +21 +4

    'Cut lamb and beef' to fight climate change

    The number of sheep and cattle in the UK should be reduced by between a fifth and a half to help combat climate change, a report says. The shift is needed, the government’s advisory Committee on Climate Change (CCC) maintains, because beef and lamb produce most farm greenhouse gases. The report foresees an increase in the number of pigs and chickens because these produce less methane. The farm union NFU said it did not agree with reducing livestock numbers.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by junglman
    +15 +5

    When Space Science Becomes a Political Liability

    Representative John Culberson, an 8-term Texas Republican and staunch supporter of NASA and planetary exploration, lost his re-election bid to Democrat Lizzie Fletcher last week. Many factors played into this outcome, but one bears consideration by space advocates: his support for the scientific search for life at Europa was seen as a weakness and attacked accordingly.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by TNY
    +23 +4

    Scientists are using artificial intelligence to see inside stars using sound waves

    How in the world could you possibly look inside a star? You could break out the scalpels and other tools of the surgical trade, but good luck getting within a few million kilometers of the surface before your skin melts off. The stars of our universe hide their secrets very well, but astronomers can outmatch their cleverness and have found ways to peer into their hearts using, of all things, sound waves.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by Pfennig88
    +14 +4

    Lab-Grown Mini Kidneys 'Go Rogue,' Sprout Brain and Muscle Cells

    Miniature lab-grown kidneys have been hiding something from the scientists who grew them. Instead of developing into different varieties of kidney cells, some of the cells took a different path and became brain and muscle cells. These simple mini kidneys — also known as kidney organoids — are grown from stem cells that are encouraged to develop into clusters of specific kidney cells. But it turns out that the "recipes" that encourage the development of specialized kidney cells were also cranking out cells from other organs, according to a new study.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by dianep
    +18 +4

    Yes, A Donut-Shaped Planet Is Technically Possible

    Have you ever wondered why every planet we know about is shaped like a sphere? Why not a cube, or an hourglass? While those—and let's be honest, most other shapes—would definitely break the laws of physics, there's one odd planet form that wouldn't: a donut.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by geoleo
    +14 +3

    Massive study reveals that eating cheese might be the key to helping you live longer

    Regardless of the various toppings and sauces you can get with your incredible pie, you truly haven't lived until you've had a pizza adorned with five different toppings. Four's fine, I suppose, but five's fantastic. Parmesan, cheddar, mozzarella and gorgonzola, but instead of a tomato sauce, the base was adorned with brie.

  • Current Event
    3 weeks ago
    by LisMan
    +23 +3

    UM stem cell research lifts hope for Alzheimer's patients

    Eva Feldman's research shows Implanting neural stem cells in the brains of mouse models improved recognition and spatial memory, along with learning

  • Current Event
    3 weeks ago
    by TentativePrince
    +13 +3

    How Long Can People Live?

    The most common risk factor for serious disease is old age. Heart disease, cancer, stroke, neurological conditions, diabetes — all increase radically with advancing years. And the older a person is, the more likely he or she is to have multiple chronic illnesses. Some scientists hope one day to treat all of them at once — by targeting aging itself.

  • Current Event
    3 weeks ago
    by zyery
    +21 +2

    Beneath Antarctica’s Ice Is a Graveyard of Dead Continents

    The eastern section of Antarctica is buried beneath a thick ice sheet. Some scientists simply assumed that under that cold mass there was nothing more than a “frozen tectonic block,” a somewhat homogeneous mass that distinguished it from the mixed up geologies of other continents. But with the help of data from a discontinued European satellite, scientists have now found that East Antarctica is in fact a graveyard of continental remnants.

  • Current Event
    3 weeks ago
    by geoleo
    +12 +2

    What Happens to the Brain in Zero Gravity?

    NASA has made a commitment to send humans to Mars by the 2030s. This is an ambitious goal when you think that a typical round trip will anywhere between three and six months and crews will be expected to stay on the red planet for up to two years before planetary alignment allows for the return journey home. It means that the astronauts have to live in reduced (micro) gravity for about three years, well beyond the current record of 438 continuous days in space held by the Russian cosmonaut Valery Polyakov.

  • Current Event
    3 weeks ago
    by spacepopper
    +7 +2

    Lost Continents Beneath Antarctica Unveiled in Dead Satellite's Data

    Ancient continents were found under Antarctic ice, thanks to old data from a now-dead European satellite. New analysis of data from the Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) mission has revealed rocky zones called "cratons" in the Earth's lithosphere, a zone between our planet's crust and mantle. GOCE plunged into Earth's atmosphere five years ago this month after the craft ran out of orbital-maneuvering fuel. While scientists were unable to predict exactly where GOCE would fall, no debris dropped into populated areas.

  • Current Event
    2 weeks ago
    by ppp
    +29 +2

    The Science Is Clear: Dirty Farm Water Is Making Us Sick

    This story originally appeared on Reveal and is part of the Climate Desk collaboration. William Whitt suffered violent diarrhea for days. But once he began vomiting blood, he knew it was time to rush to the hospital. His body swelled up so much that his wife thought he looked like the Michelin Man, and on the inside, his intestines were inflamed and bleeding.

  • Current Event
    11 days ago
    by hiihii
    +7 +1

    The physics trick that has allowed spacecraft to venture deeper into space

    Traveling the vast distances of space isn’t cheap. It costs spacecraft time, fuel and money. Fortunately, nature offers free help along the way and mission designers always take it. They’re called gravity assists. In these manoeuvres, a spacecraft exchanges its momentum in a close encounter with a planet to gain velocity. Gravity assists have been used in numerous interplanetary missions to propel spacecraft towards their destinations.

  • Current Event
    11 days ago
    by belangermira
    +12 +1

    How to Measure All the Starlight in the Universe

    Astrophysicists have devised a clever way to count up the photons in space, stretching back to the cosmos’ adolescence. Until the 20th century, astronomers were stuck on a question that seems as if it should have an easy answer: Why is the night sky dark? If the infinite universe has an infinite numbers of stars, as they assumed, our evening view should be awash in their glow.

  • Current Event
    11 days ago
    by belangermira
    +5 +1

    The Large Hadron Collider is shutting down for 2 years

    The world’s most powerful particle accelerator has gone quiet. Particles took their last spin around the Large Hadron Collider on December 3 before scientists shut the machine down for two years of upgrades. Located at the particle physics laboratory CERN in Geneva, the accelerator has smashed together approximately 16 million billion protons since 2015, when it reached its current energy of 13 trillion electron volts. Planned improvements before the machine restarts in 2021 will bring the energy up to 14 trillion electron volts — the energy it was originally designed to reach.

  • Video/Audio
    11 days ago
    by Gozzin
    +6 +1

    Robert Lustig, M.D., M.S.L. — "Processed Food: An Experiment That Failed"

    What went wrong and why people are paying for it is explained very welt in this video.

  • Current Event
    10 days ago
    by TNY
    +4 +1

    Teens don't have to be underweight to have anorexia

    A study finds that 31 percent of patients with anorexia nervosa had all the cognitive features and physical complications of the disease without being underweight. Dietitian Melissa Whitelaw of the University of Melbourne is calling for a change to anorexia nervosa’s diagnostic criteria after finding that patients with “atypical anorexia” suffer serious health concerns despite being within or above the healthy weight range.

  • Analysis
    10 days ago
    by NitanSingh
    +1 +1

    17 Amazing Googles 20th Birthday Facts

    17 Amazing Googles 20th Birthday Facts,Happy birthday, Google! While Google Inc. was officially incorporated on Sept. 4 1998 (and Google search is actually one year older), 17 Amazing Googles 20th Birthday Facts,Cheerful birthday, Google! While Google Inc. was authoritatively joined on Sept. 4 1998 (and Google look is really one year more seasoned), the organization has as of late been praising its commemoration on Sept. 27. On this day, the tech monster denotes the event with a unique birthday Google doodle on its landing page.

  • Current Event
    10 days ago
    by NitanSingh
    +2 +1

    Verizon vpn app service video,because nothing’s fishy about that amazing

    Verizon vpn app service,Those who loves to don't watch adds, this is for you, verizon safe is a new vpn app which will block adds. It i s cheaper not much costly. so everyone can buy this.This is usable by 10 devices.Verizon vpn app service.

  • Current Event
    10 days ago
    by NitanSingh
    +2 +1

    iphone x price in dubai 64gb without facetime app for android

     iphone x price in dubai 64gb without facetime app for android is 3,698.99 AED (1,007.07 in $ dollars ). I bought iphone x 256gb price in uae 4,318.00 AED, but i recommend that every have to buy iphone x. iphone x price varies in every country. iphone x price in dubai 64gb is quite cheap.