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  • Analysis
    4 years ago
    by drunkenninja
    +7 +1

    With his super-sized arm, this man has the perfect job - arm wrestler

    When Matthais Schlitte was 16 he wandered into a bar and discovered that he was pretty good at arm-wrestling, due to his super human arm, pictured.

  • Analysis
    4 years ago
    by LosCebulos
    +10 +1

    The 11 dumbest things that 30 percent of Americans believe

    On Monday, it came to the attention of the Daily Dot’s editorial staff that more than 30 percent of Americans pronounce the word “meme” as “me-me” - a statistic that seems to jibe with a study that claimed that 30 percent of Americans don’t have home access to broadband Internet. Still, it got us thinking: What other misinformation does roughly a third of this great nation believe? The answers, we soon found out, are as disheartening as they are stupid. Get ready to rage.

  • Analysis
    4 years ago
    by capoti
    +22 +1

    The UN thinks we could hit peak births in 2014

    The UN expects global births to hit a record 139 million in 2014 — and then start falling. But how reliable is that?

  • Unspecified
    4 years ago
    by blacklegend
    +1 +1

    The Message from Water

    What has put Dr. Emoto at the forefront of the study of water is his proof that thoughts and feelings affect physical reality. By producing different focused intentions through written and spoken words and music and literally presenting it to the same water samples, the water appears to “change its expression”.

  • Expression
    4 years ago
    by hxxp
    +18 +1

    Belonging -- why South Africans refuse to let Africa in

    Any African who has ever tried to visit South Africa will know that the country is not an easy entry destination. South African embassies across the continent are almost as difficult to access as those of the UK and the United States. They are characterised by long queues, inordinate amounts of paperwork, and officials who manage to be simultaneously rude and lethargic.

  • Current Event
    4 years ago
    by ventrical
    +15 +1

    Alexander Grothendieck, Math Enigma, Dies at 86

    Alexander Grothendieck, whose gift for deep abstraction excavated new ground in the field known as algebraic geometry and supplied a theoretical foundation for the solving of some of the most vexing conundrums of modern mathematics, died on Thursday in Ariège, in the French Pyrenees. He was 86.

  • Expression
    4 years ago
    by sauce
    +13 +1

    The Lives They Lived. Remembering some of those we lost this year.

    There is the Ruby Dee of my childhood: In black and white, in “A Raisin in the Sun,” the grainy old movie that my middle-school teacher showed us to prepare us for our fall production of the play. As Ruth Younger, the young wife and almost matriarch of a hard-pressed black family living on the South Side of Chicago, Dee was supposed to appear worked over, resigned, deferred. We were just children, but my teacher told us to look...

  • Expression
    4 years ago
    by geoleo
    +19 +1

    Woman ditched smiling for 40 years to avoid wrinkles

    A British woman has gone without smiling for 40 years, more than two thirds of her life, in a move to forestall the wrinkles associated with old age. “I don’t have wrinkles because I have trained myself to control my facial muscles,” Tess Christian, 50, the Daily Mail newspaper reported. “Everyone asks if I’ve had Botox, but I haven’t, and I know that it’s thanks to the fact I haven’t laughed or smiled since I was a teenager. My dedication has paid off, I don’t have a single line on...

  • Analysis
    4 years ago
    by TNY
    +12 +1

    The Island Where People Forget to Die

    In 1943, a Greek war veteran named Stamatis Moraitis came to the United States for treatment of a combat-mangled arm. He’d survived a gunshot wound, escaped to Turkey and eventually talked his way onto the Queen Elizabeth, then serving as a troopship, to cross the Atlantic. Moraitis settled in Port Jefferson, N.Y., an enclave of countrymen from his native island, Ikaria. He quickly landed a job doing manual labor. Later, he moved to Boynton Beach, Fla. Along the way...

  • Expression
    4 years ago
    by drunkenninja
    +11 +1

    Homeward

    When Hugo Lucitante was a boy, his tribe sent him away to learn about the outside world so that, one day, he might return and save their village. Can he live up to their hopes?

  • Expression
    4 years ago
    by wetwilly87
    +22 +1

    The Time Everyone “Corrected” the World’s Smartest Woman

    By all accounts, Marilyn vos Savant was a child prodigy. Born in St. Louis, Missouri in 1946, the young savant quickly developed an aptitude for math and science. At age 10, she was given two intelligence tests -- the Stanford-Binet, and the Mega Test -- both of which placed her mental capacity at that of a 23-year-old. She went on to be listed in the Guinness Book of World Records for having the “World’s Highest IQ,” and, as a result, gained international fame.

  • Expression
    4 years ago
    by drunkenninja
    +11 +1

    The Right to Be Forgotten, the Privilege to Be Remembered

    My mom was born in February. She died in February, too. And this year, as in past years since her death, in February lame marketers and data brokers remember her. They send her letters which say, right on the envelope, “Happy Birthday!” Personalized, for her. I wish they would forget her. What does it mean to be “forgotten”? So many people are, whether they have a right to it or not. But being easily linked, forever, to certain search engine results — is that the opposite of being forgotten.

  • Current Event
    3 years ago
    by roxxy
    +20 +1

    Thai temple to build separate toilets for non-Chinese visitors after complaints

    A famous temple in northern Thailand will build separate toilets for Thais and other non-Chinese tourists after Chinese tourists apparently made lavatories unusable for others, German news agency DPA reported on Saturday. Wat Rong Khun, better known as the White Temple, in Chiang Rai will add the new toilets in response to complaints about alleged grossly inconsiderate behaviour by Chinese tourists, temple officials said according to DPA.

  • Current Event
    3 years ago
    by Cobbydaler
    +15 +1

    Norm Carlson, Who Gave 'Go' for NASA's Saturn V, Shuttle and Beans, Dies at 81

    When U.S. astronauts next launch to space from Florida, the control team that oversees their liftoff may celebrate with the traditional crock of beans. If so, they'll be honoring the legacy of test director Norm Carlson, too.

  • Analysis
    3 years ago
    by everlost
    +10 +1

    The psychology of 'no': Vancouver transit vote is case study in why it's so hard to do what makes us happy

    Residents of Metro Vancouver are about to participate en masse in a fascinating behavioral experiment. If you care about happiness in cities, you should pay attention to the results, because this kind of experiment is being repeated in cities across the continent. In the 2013 election campaign, B.C. Premier Christy Clark pledged Metro Vancouver would not be taxed in new ways for transportation without getting a chance to vote on it.

  • Expression
    3 years ago
    by messi
    +14 +1

    What Russians really think

    When I visited him last month in Moscow, Kirill Yerokhin was in his living room, which had been decked out as if for a family celebration. Platters with fruit, thick pink and white slices of pastila, the Russian sweet, and piroshki, little buns with sweet and savoury fillings, covered the coffee table. From a dozen wooden frames on the wall, Marshall Georgy Zhukov, the Soviet Union’s greatest war hero and Yerokhin’s grandfather, looked down.

  • Expression
    3 years ago
    by socialiguana
    +11 +1

    Kanye West: The World’s 100 Most Influential People

    Kanye West would be the first person to tell you he belongs on this list. The dude doesn’t believe in false modesty, and he shouldn’t. Kanye’s belief in himself and his incredible tenacity—he performed his first single with his jaw wired shut—got him to where he is today. And he fought for his place in the cultural pantheon with a purpose. In his debut album, over a decade ago, Kanye issued what amounted to a social critique and a call to arms (with a beat)...

  • Current Event
    3 years ago
    by mtnrg
    +2 +1

    OMG: 2.1 million people still use AOL dial-up

    It sounds crazy, but 2.1 million people in the United States still use AOL dial-up to connect to the Internet.

  • Analysis
    3 years ago
    by mtnrg
    +1 +1

    The Liberal Diversity Dilemma | Opinion | The Harvard Crimson

    Commencement 2015

  • Unspecified
    3 years ago
    by nowsourcing
    +12 +1

    Packing It Up and Packing It In: Where Is America Growing? [Infographic]

    SpareFoot infographic shows which places in the U.S. are seeing the biggest influx of people.

  • Expression
    3 years ago
    by aj0690
    +14 +1

    Judd Apatow: The Rolling Stone Interview

    In a fluorescent-lit hallway at a Long Island nursing home, Judd Apatow sits on an overturned box beside a collapsed wheelchair, marking a two-page printout of jokes. It's 8:40 a.m. on May 19th, 2014: the first day of production on Apatow's fifth directorial feature, Trainwreck. Residents mill around on walkers and canes; one wants to enter the home's glassed-in sitting porch, but Apatow has transformed it into a set. A production assistant tasked with directing elderly traffic reroutes her...

  • Analysis
    3 years ago
    by Fooferhill
    +1 +1

    9 common behaviours that hurt your chances of success

    Don't worry -- you aren't doomed to failure.

  • Analysis
    3 years ago
    by Fooferhill
    +13 +1

    The Five Mistakes That Can Ruin Any Handshake

    At the forty or so seminars I give yearly, I always ask the same question: "Who here has ever received a bad handshake?" Invariably everyone raises their hands—no surprise there. Perhaps you’ve wondered, as I have, “How can so many people get something so simple as a handshake wrong?” What's even more startling is how long we remember those bad handshakes.

  • Expression
    3 years ago
    by KondoR
    +15 +1

    15 things you’ll only know if you’re sarcastic

    It’s been proven that sarcasm can help to make a person three times more creative, but of course you already knew that because when it comes to sarcasm you’ve got it all covered. Not only are you cutting edge with your wit, but you can almost get away with anything because no-one can ever work out if you really mean what you say. You *might* know the following if you’re sarcastic too…

  • Expression
    3 years ago
    by TNY
    +15 +1

    It Was 30 Years Ago Today…

    ….that Battleland contributor Franklin C. “Chuck” Spinney’s penetrating countenance gazed out from Time’s red-bordered cover asking U.S. Defense Spending: Are Billions Being Wasted? The cover story (we’ve put it outside the paywall — Special Limited-Time Offer to read it for free!) — instantly made Spinney the poster child for Pentagon insiders distraught at the profligacy of the Reagan Administration’s military buildup.

  • Analysis
    3 years ago
    by Fooferhill
    +2 +1

    What's in a Name?: Professor takes on roles of Romani activist and spokesperson to improve plight of his ethnic group

    Ian Hancock is not a gypsy. He is a Romani. The difference in nomenclature is so important that Hancock, a professor of English, linguistics and Asian studies at The University of Texas at Austin since 1972, has devoted most of his adult life to dispelling ignorance about the ethnic group into which he was born.

  • Expression
    3 years ago
    by zyery
    +25 +1

    BIRD BRAIN! Man Cuts Off Ears To Look More Like His Parrot

    This was no fly-by-night decision. Ted Richards loves his parrots so much that he had his face and eyeballs tattooed to look more them. If that wasn't bird-brained enough, the 56-year-old resident of Bristol, England, went even further by having his ears removed in a six-hour operation.

  • Expression
    3 years ago
    by hedman
    +54 +1

    Japan's hidden caste of untouchables

    Japan has a reputation of being a homogeneous, mostly harmonious society. There are few foreigners, linguistic differences are rare and on the surface class distinctions are largely absent. But, as Mike Sunda discovered, there is one, often hidden, exception: Japan's untouchables. In the corner of a pristine room tucked away in Tokyo's Shibaura meat market is a table topped with a stack of crudely composed hate mail - evidence of a prejudice that dates back to medieval times.

  • Expression
    3 years ago
    by ticktack
    +23 +1

    Calling it a day: 72-year employee of Gadsden's Goodyear plant retires

    "Mister Sid" has finally called it a day. Sidney Richardson, 90, retired last week from Gadsden's Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co. plant, 72 years after he was hired. Richardson was the longest-serving hourly Goodyear employee for the corporation worldwide. More than 9,000 employees have been hired at the plant since Richardson, as attested by his time clock card - No. 0912. New employee cards have passed the 10,000 mark. He was the only remaining employee with a "zero" number.

  • Analysis
    3 years ago
    by ppp
    +59 +1

    The science of protecting people’s feelings: why we pretend all opinions are equal

    It’s both the coolest — and also in some ways the most depressing — psychology study ever. Indeed, it’s so cool (and so depressing) that the name of its chief finding — the Dunning-Kruger effect — has at least halfway filtered into public consciousness. In the classic 1999 paper, Cornell researchers David Dunning and Justin Kruger found that the less competent people were in three domains — humor, logic, and grammar — the less likely they were to be able...

  • Expression
    3 years ago
    by darvinhg
    +10 +1

    Making Sense of Shia LaBeouf's Art: Paper Bags, Rat Tails and #AllMyMovies

    Shia LaBeouf the performance artist is on the loose again and we couldn't be more excited. By now you've heard about his latest stunt, #allmymovies, right? According to The Guardian, the actor is currently at the Angelika Film Center in New York City, watching all of his movies back to back. That is correct, all of his movies. Shia tweeted the address for the event this morning so that you can sit alongside him and lose yourself in the cinematic work of Shia. Disturbia-ing, right?

  • Expression
    3 years ago
    by TNY
    +25 +1

    Conversations with North Koreans

    It was a fair question, but the last I expected from a North Korean. Mr. Gang, I’ll call him, is a wealthy, middle-aged businessman from Pyongyang. We met outside the North a few weeks ago, waiting for the same flight. I was on my way to visit North Korea with a group tour, and Mr. Gang was headed home. He was glad to meet me, he said. I was the first American he’d ever spoken to, and the first Westerner he had ever met who spoke Korean. He shook my hand and...

  • Current Event
    3 years ago
    by ubthejudge
    +37 +1

    After Dropbox finds a child porn collector, a chess club stops his knife attack

    Dustin Brown wanted a secure grip on the two knives he had selected to slaughter the children. Before leaving his Morton, Illinois, home on the afternoon of October 13, the 19-year-old wrapped each knife's handle carefully with duct tape. He then pulled on a pair of grippy gloves. The one-mile journey to the public library gave Brown one final chance to rehearse the plan he had contemplated for the last two weeks. Five-inch blades jingled together in his backpack all the while.

  • Expression
    3 years ago
    by ubthejudge
    +30 +1

    Europe's oldest person celebrates 116th birthday in Italy

    Emma Morano, Europe’s oldest person and the second-oldest in the world, marked her 116th birthday by offering to sing her favourite song for visiting well-wishers, Italian media reported. Morano, one of only two women alive certified to have been born in the 19th century, reached the milestone on Sunday in her one-bedroom flat in Verbania, a small town in the Piedmont region of north-west Italy.

  • Video/Audio
    3 years ago
    by darvinhg
    +16 +1

    The man who couldn't die

    In remote villages in Italy all the way to the cold mountains in the Middle East the mourners dress the color of death and chase the casket. The women reach their hands to the very limit of their bones and cry a burst of thorns. As if they want the heavens to hear their grief. I wonder if anyone is listening. And does it matter?