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  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by TNY
    +11 +3

    Study identifies gene that makes gentle touch feel painful after injury

    Ever wonder why things that normally feel gentle, like putting on soft shirts, are painful after a sunburn? In a study of four patients with a rare genetic disorder, NIH researchers found that PIEZO2, a gene previously shown to control our sense of our bodies in space and gentle touch, may also be responsible for tactile allodynia: the skin’s reaction to injury that makes normally gentle touches feel painful.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by messi
    +27 +4

    More than half Venezuela's doctors emigrated since 2012: NGOs

    More than half Venezuela's doctors have been forced to flee the country's crushing economic and political crisis, according to a report by health NGOs released Thursday. "Between 2012 and 2017, 22,000 Venezuelan doctors migrated" -- 55 percent of the total 39,000 doctors registered by the PanAmerican Health Organization in 2014, the report said. Some 6,000 nurses -- nearly a quarter of Venezuela's total -- also left the country during the same period. Nearly two million people have emigrated since 2015, the UN said, adding that around 5,000 people are leaving the country daily.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by ticktack
    +18 +3

    Handheld biopen prints human cartilage

    A handheld “biopen” capable of 3D printing cartilage tissue could for the first time be used during surgery to treat cartilage injuries and osteoarthritus. The extrusion-based device, which prints live stem cells embedded in a hydrogel material, produces constructs that look and behave just like natural articular tissue (Biofabrication 10 045006).

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by Chubros
    +14 +3

    Drug companies will have to publish list prices a new rule

    Drug companies will have to give list prices for their products in television ads under a new proposal the Trump administration released Monday. The new rule, which is open for discussion, would affect any drug covered by Medicare or Medicaid. Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar announced the new proposal just hours after the lobby group that represents big drug companies said its members would start indirectly mentioning prices in their television ads.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by wildcard
    +19 +3

    Spanish doctors 'eliminate' HIV from patient in stem cell transplant trial

    SPANISH scientists believe they may have managed to eliminate HIV from a patient using stem cell transplant treatment.  Scientists from the Institute for AIDS Research IrsiCaixa in Barcelona and the Gregorio Maranon Hospital in Madrid have managed to remove the virus from the blood and tissues of six patients using the treatment.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by roxxy
    +14 +3

    Unexpected role of enzyme may help develop anti-cancer drugs

    A newly discovered role for the enzyme glutamine synthetase could have important implications for developing anti-cancer drugs according to a new UCL study. An intrinsic part of tumour growth is the sprouting of blood vessels, which supply cancerous tumours with the blood and energy that they need to survive.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by baron778
    +14 +2

    Deep brain stimulation not effective for treating early Alzheimer's

    A new study from Johns Hopkins shows that individuals with early onset Alzheimer's disease—those under the age of 65—don't benefit from deep brain stimulation, a treatment already proven to be effective for easing motor symptoms of people with Parkinson's disease. "Our results suggest that as we look at deep brain stimulation as a treatment for Alzheimer's disease, we should probably focus on those over 65, which is the bulk of people with Alzheimer's," says Jeannie-Marie Leoutsakos, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by darvinhg
    +15 +2

    Overuse of antibiotics 'risks return to dark ages of life-threatening surgery'

    We face a return to the dark ages of life-threatening surgery unless we can preserve the infection-killing powers of antibiotics, according to England’s chief medical officer. Dame Sally Davies made her remarks as Public Health England (PHE) published a report showing that 3 million common surgical procedures, including caesarean sections and hip replacements, could be hazardous in a future where hospital-acquired infections have become resistant to the antibiotics we have to treat them.

  • Current Event
    3 weeks ago
    by ilyas
    +8 +2

    This 13-Year-Old's Tool Could Change Pancreatic Cancer Treatment

    An Oregon teenager’s innovation could change the way doctors treat pancreatic cancer, a deadly form of the disease that has just a 7% five-year survival rate. Rishab Jain, a 13-year-old from Stoller Middle School in Portland, on Tuesday won the Discovery Education 3M Young Scientist Challenge with an algorithm that uses machine learning to help doctors zero in on the pancreas during cancer treatment.

  • Current Event
    3 weeks ago
    by Petrox
    +20 +2

    Finally, the drug that keeps you young

    udith Campisi has been a leading figure in the biology of aging since the early 1990s, when her research on the basic mechanisms of cancer revealed an unexpected finding—that cells enter a phase known as senescence that prevents them from becoming cancerous. More than 25 years later, the insight has led to a new kind of drug that may slow or modestly reverse human aging.

  • Current Event
    3 weeks ago
    by drunkenninja
    +14 +2

    'Spectacular' diabetes treatment could end daily insulin injections

    A potential medical breakthrough that could put an end to the daily insulin injections endured by people living with diabetes has been unveiled by Dutch scientists. By destroying the mucous membrane in the small intestine and causing a new one to develop, scientists stabilised the blood sugar levels of people with type 2 diabetes. The results have been described as “spectacular” – albeit unexpected – by the chief researchers involved.

  • Current Event
    11 days ago
    by ubthejudge
    +3 +1

    Laura Levis died outside a Boston-area ER. The doors were locked. Why?

    My wife, Laura Levis, did everything she could to save herself when the asthma attack began. She went to Somerville Hospital and called 911, too. How could she have been left to die just outside the emergency room?

  • Current Event
    3 months ago
    by ubthejudge
    +27 +7

    Drug 'may cut need for liver transplants'

    A potential treatment for sudden liver failure could cut the need for transplants, say scientists at the University of Edinburgh. The liver has an incredible natural ability to repair itself, but this can be lost in some injuries including severe drug overdoses. The therapy is a cancer drug that restores this regenerative potential.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by LisMan
    +30 +6

    Aspirin disappoints for avoiding first heart attack, stroke

    Taking a low-dose aspirin every day has long been known to cut the chances of another heart attack, stroke or other heart problem in people who already have had one, but the risks don't outweigh the benefits for most other folks, major new research finds.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by TNY
    +20 +5

    Experimental painkiller molecule as powerful as morphine, but not addictive

    As an opioid epidemic spreads across the western world, researchers believe they’re close to developing a non-addictive painkiller. Figures from the US National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) estimate that about 115 people in the country are overdosing on opioids every single day. Aside from the financial costs such an addiction brings to a national healthcare system, it can be hugely traumatic for the person addicted to these drugs, and for their families.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by Chubros
    +18 +4

    CRISPR halts Duchenne muscular dystrophy progression in dogs

    Scientists for the first time have used CRISPR gene editing to halt the progression of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) in a large mammal, according to a study by UT Southwestern that provides a strong indication that a lifesaving treatment may be in the pipeline. The research published in Science documents unprecedented improvement in the muscle fibers of dogs with DMD – the most common fatal genetic disease in children, caused by a mutation that inhibits the production of dystrophin, a protein critical for muscle function.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by rexall
    +19 +4

    'Ground-breaking' diabetes insulin drug

    A "ground-breaking" drug that helps people with diabetes re-grow insulin-making cells has been developed. About 19,000 people live with Type 1 of the condition in Wales and 90% have less than 5% of these cells left. This means they have to inject insulin but it is hoped the new drug will mean patients may not have to in the future. The trials are being conducted by researchers at Cardiff and Vale University Health Board and two people have already been given the drug.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by doodlegirl
    +21 +3

    Schizophrenia breakthrough: Scientists identify new suspect at 'scene of crime'

    As a type of immune cell, it has always been considered one of the good guys. But in a stunning breakthrough in schizophrenia research, scientists say the "macrophage" immune cell can go rogue, causing havoc in the brain. "Macrophage" means "big eaters" in Greek and is a fitting name for the cell because - when behaving - it digests cellular debris and foreign substances.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by hiihii
    +16 +3

    Soon your doctor will be able to wirelessly track your health—even through walls

    MIT professor Dina Katabi is building a gadget that can sit in one spot and track everything from breathing to walking, no wearables required.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by jasont
    +16 +5

    Sugar pills relieve pain for chronic pain patients

    Someday doctors may prescribe sugar pills for certain chronic pain patients based on their brain anatomy and psychology. And the pills will reduce their pain as effectively as any powerful drug on the market, according to new research. Northwestern Medicine scientists have shown they can reliably predict which chronic pain patients will respond to a sugar placebo pill based on the patients’ brain anatomy and psychological characteristics.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by ppp
    +15 +3

    Study: A Daily Baby Aspirin Has No Benefit For Healthy Older People

    Results from a large international study show that risks from taking daily low-dose aspirin outweigh the potential benefits for older people in generally good health.

  • Analysis
    2 months ago
    by kxh
    +21 +3

    Unprecedented Medical Case Shows How 4 People Got Cancer From Just One Organ Donor

    It's a devastating case that serves as the medical warning we didn't even know we needed. An organ donor unknowingly bequeathed her undetected, malignant cancer at the same time as her organs.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by ppp
    +10 +3

    Three organ transplant patients die of cancer contracted from single donor

    Doctors have reported a case where three patients died from breast cancer which they contracted from a single organ donor, a 53-year old woman with the disease whose kidneys, lungs, liver and heart were transplanted. After suffering a stroke in 2007 the woman’s organs were donated to five people, but her diagnosis was not known to doctors and four patients contracted aggressive “donor derived” breast cancers.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by Nelson
    +24 +4

    What time is it in your body?

    The first simple blood test to identify your body’s precise internal time clock as compared to the external time has been developed by Northwestern Medicine scientists. The test, TimeSignature – which requires only two blood draws – can tell physicians and researchers the time in your body despite the time in the external world. For instance, even if it’s 8 a.m. in the external world, it might be 6 a.m. in your body.

  • Analysis
    2 months ago
    by zobo
    +10 +3

    Homeopathy Ineffective Against Children's Cold and Flu

    Acute respiratory tract infections (ARTIs), including the common cold, influenza, and pneumonia, are quite common in children. On average, kids experience between three and six of these infections every year. Most cases resolve without any serious harm, but tens of millions of these infections require hospitalization each year across the globe. In fact, ARTIs account for a quarter of deaths in children under age five, with pneumonia by far inflicting the most casualties.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by 8mm
    +25 +3

    New research reveals a mitochondrial gene that protects against dementia and other diseases of aging

    New research from USC has uncovered a previously unknown genetic risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias. The study provides insights on how these conditions, and other diseases of aging, might one day be treated and prevented. The research from the Cohen Lab at the USC Leonard Davis School of Gerontology sheds new light on the protective role of a naturally occurring mitochondrial peptide, known as humanin.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by zritic
    +15 +2

    New Drug Offers Hope for Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    A new drug offers hope to people suffering from Multiple Sclerosis (MS).In clinical trials, the drug reduced nerve damaged in patients by almost 50%. Research tested an oral drug called ibudilast in patients with progressive Multiple Sclerosis (MS). 255 Multiple Sclerosis patients were recruited from medical centers and were randomly assigned to take either ibudilast or placebo pills for 96 weeks.

  • Analysis
    1 month ago
    by kxh
    +19 +5

    Antidepressants might fail if you use your phone in bed, study suggests

    Monash University research raises the prospect of a link between antidepressants and light sensitivity.

  • Expression
    1 month ago
    by AdelleChattre
    +16 +4

    The Child-Abuse Contrarian

    Michael Holick, a renowned scientist turned expert witness, relies on his own controversial theory about a condition called hypermobile EDS to help alleged abusers avoid prison and regain custody of the babies they were accused of harming. By David Armstrong.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by rexall
    +13 +3

    Powerful antibodies suppress HIV for months, could simplify treatment

    Anti-HIV drugs have prevented millions of early deaths from AIDS, but infected people must take the pills every day, for life. Now, two studies in small numbers of people show for the first time that infusions of two powerful anti-HIV antibodies can completely suppress the virus for several months. If the results pan out in larger studies, they could simplify treatment for people who have difficulty taking daily medication, reduce the risk of drug resistance emergence, and even help cut HIV transmission rates.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by ppp
    +13 +2

    A drug derived from marijuana has triggered the first federal shift on cannabis in half a century, and experts predict an avalanche effect

    The nation's top drug regulator has officially changed how it regulates FDA-approved drugs that contain CBD, a marijuana compound, with the approval of the epilepsy drug Epidiolex. It's the first time in 46 years that the Drug Enforcement Administration has shifted its stance on cannabis.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by cone
    +14 +3

    Contraceptive pill linked with reduced risk of ovarian cancer

    Women who use modern forms of the combined pill are at a lower risk of developing ovarian cancer than women who don’t take hormonal contraception, research suggests. The study backs up previous findings for older forms of the combined pill – an oral contraceptive that contains artificial versions of both oestrogen and progesterone. Modern forms of the pill contain different doses of synthetic oestrogen and different types of progestins, and are sometimes taken continuously.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by weekendhobo
    +11 +2

    He Got Schizophrenia. He Got Cancer. And Then He Got Cured.

    The man was 23 when the delusions came on. He became convinced that his thoughts were leaking out of his head and that other people could hear them. When he watched television, he thought the actors were signaling him, trying to communicate. He became irritable and anxious and couldn’t sleep. Dr. Tsuyoshi Miyaoka, a psychiatrist treating him at the Shimane University School of Medicine in Japan, eventually diagnosed paranoid schizophrenia. He then prescribed a series of antipsychotic drugs. None helped. The man’s symptoms were, in medical parlance, “treatment resistant.”

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by 8mm
    +16 +4

    Bacterial therapy tolerable, shows early promise in patients with advanced solid tumors

    A phase I clinical trial investigating the use of bacterial Clostridium novyi-NT spores as an injectable monotherapy had manageable toxicities and showed early clinical efficacy in patients with treatment-refractory solid tumor malignancies, according to data presented at the Fourth CRI-CIMT-EATI-AACR International Cancer Immunotherapy Conference: Translating Science into Survival, held Sept. 30-Oct. 3.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by aj0690
    +13 +2

    Nobel prize for landmark cancer therapy

    Two scientists who discovered how to fight cancer using the body's immune system have won the 2018 Nobel Prize for physiology or medicine. The work, by Professor James P Allison from the US and Professor Tasuku Honjo from Japan, has led to treatments for advanced, deadly skin cancer. Immune checkpoint therapy has revolutionised cancer treatment, said the prize-giving Swedish Academy. Experts say it has proved to be "strikingly effective".