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  • Analysis
    2 years ago
    by TNY
    +35 +1

    Homeopathy effective for 0 out of 68 illnesses, study finds

    A leading scientist has declared homeopathy a "therapeutic dead-end" after a systematic review concluded the controversial treatment was no more effective than placebo drugs. Professor Paul Glasziou, a leading academic in evidence based medicine at Bond University, was the chair of a working party by the National Health and Medical Research Council which was tasked with reviewing the evidence of 176 trials of homeopathy to establish if the treatment is valid.

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by funhonestdude
    +29 +1

    Federal Court strikes down ban on medical marijuana patients growing own pot

    A Federal Court judge has struck down federal regulations restricting the rights of medical marijuana patients to grow their own cannabis and given the Liberal government six months to come up with new rules.

  • Analysis
    2 years ago
    by hxxp
    +37 +1

    Handy Device Shows Where Patient's Veins Are Located

    Those who fear needles are not likely to want to experience the prick more than once. And even experienced medical professionals can miss a vein sometimes, so it helps to have a little guidance. The VeinViewer uses harmless, near-infrared light to show precisely where veins are located and take the guesswork out of the process. Designed by Memphis-based company Christie Medical Holdings, the device can find the veins and then project them onto the arm in real time.

  • Expression
    2 years ago
    by CatLady
    +21 +1

    Touching the Past: Why History Is Important?

    But why does history matter? What is the ‘point’ of history? What is the value of humanities in a modern society?

  • Expression
    2 years ago
    by socialiguana
    +15 +1

    Inside the Unregulated Chinese Hospitals That Make Men Impotent

    Doctors at private clinics are destroying men's penises, tricking women into aborting healthy fetuses, and killing patients through negligence—so why are American companies investing millions? On the afternoon of September 30, 2015, 23-year-old Little Huang stood on the roof of the 11-story Shenzhen Health and Family Planning Commission building, ready to jump to his death. In the lot below, Chinese officials' cars looked about the size of matchboxes, and the clamor...

  • Analysis
    2 years ago
    by Gozzin
    +20 +1

    Medical Equipment Crashes During Heart Procedure Because of a Antivirus Scan.

    A critical medical equipment crashed during a heart procedure thanks to a scan triggered by the antivirus software installed on a Windows PC. Why are people ok with this?

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by bkool
    +40 +2

    Man Receives First Penis Transplant in the United States

    A man whose penis was removed because of cancer has received the first penis transplant in the United States, at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. Thomas Manning, 64, a bank courier from Halifax, Mass., underwent the 15-hour transplant operation on May 8 and 9. The organ came from a deceased donor. “I want to go back to being who I was,” Mr. Manning said on Friday in an interview in his hospital room. Sitting up in a chair, happy to be out of bed...

  • Analysis
    2 years ago
    by drunkenninja
    +31 +1

    What happens to your body on Mount Everest

    "Human beings aren't built to function at the cruising altitude of a 747," the voice in the trailer for the film "Everest" warns. "Our bodies will be literally dying." It's Rob Hall, played by actor Jason Clarke, as he prepares to lead an expedition up the world's highest peak. The film, also starring Jake Gyllenhaal and Josh Brolin, is based on a 1996 climb, when eight people died during a blizzard. This particular journey is well known: Its horrifying details were chronicled in Jon Krakaue

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by weekendhobo
    +29 +1

    Breast cancer cell growth halted by osteoporosis drug, study shows

    Women who have a high risk of breast cancer may benefit from a drug that is already prescribed to treat bone loss in old age, according to scientists in Australia. Researchers found that the osteoporosis drug, denosumab, can halt the growth of cells which give rise to breast tumours in women whose risk of the disease is greater because of mutations in a gene called BRCA1.

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by canuck
    +34 +1

    Saskatoon woman says she was fired for having allergic reaction on the job

    A Saskatoon woman says she was fired from her retail job earlier this week -- not for being late or slacking off, but for having an allergic reaction on the job. Danielle Duperreault has several life-threatening allergies, including one to bell peppers. On Monday while at work at a local Urban Planet clothing store, Duperreault ate some of her colleagues’ seasoned nuts, not realizing they contained pepper powder. Within minutes, her tongue began burning and her skin started itching and she realized she was going into anaphylactic shock.

  • Analysis
    2 years ago
    by ubthejudge
    +34 +1

    Paralyzed Muscle Movement Can Be Restored Through Repeated Stimulation

    Patients that have experienced damage to their spinal cords may see success with a treatment involving repeated muscle stimulation. A new study was conducted at Helsinki University Hospital and it los very promising. Dr Anastasia Shulga was the leader of this study and she attempted something completely new. This was the first time that this type of long-term nerve stimulation was given to patients with spinal cord injuries for rehabilitation purposes. Two patients took part in the study, which involved a combination of magnetic transcranial stimulation and peripheral nerve simultaneous stimulation.

  • Expression
    2 years ago
    by distant
    +29 +1

    The Secret Documents That Detail How Patients’ Privacy is Breached

    A federal agency sends thousands of letters a year to health providers closing out complaints about HIPAA violations. Though the government could make those letters public, it doesn’t. ProPublica has started to do so. When the federal government takes the rare step of fining medical providers for violating the privacy and security of patients’ medical information, it issues a press release and posts details on the web.

  • How-to
    2 years ago
    by sameer
    +1 +1

    Best Pressure Points For Headaches

    Everyone experiences a headache at least once in a life. The most common cause of headache is stress. Usually people opt for painkillers but for those who believe in natural cure, this post about the pressure points can help.

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by wetwilly87
    +23 +1

    Scientists test use of virtual reality to diagnose pedophilia

    A handful of scientists are testing a controversial practice of using virtual reality to diagnose pedophilia in men in hopes of helping them manage their sexual desires before they act on them. Pedophilia, a psychiatric disorder, affects up to 5 percent of men, according to the American Psychiatric Association. But it’s difficult to study because researchers don’t want to use real photos of children to measure arousal. So they’re turning to 3-D animated characters and virtual reality.

  • Analysis
    2 years ago
    by spanishflyco
    -1 +1

    NSFW Spanish Fly

    The Best Sexual Enhancement Products Online

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by ckshenn
    +4 +1

    Doctors remove 40 knives from man's stomach

    A man in India spent two months swallowing knives and had 40 of them surgically removed from his stomach, according to the doctor who led the operation. "He had a wild urge to consume metal. Even for us, the experienced surgeons, it was frightening," Dr. Jatinder Malhotra told CNN. "We were so nervous... a small mistake could have taken the patient's life. In my 20 years of practice, I have never seen anything like it." Malhotra said it took his team about two days to form a diagnosis and surgery plan.

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by darvinhg
    +31 +1

    Insulin price spike leaves diabetes patients in crisis

    A massive spike in insulin prices is causing a health crisis for millions of diabetes patients who depend on the lifesaving drug, doctors say. Now, after years of rapid increases having nothing to do with available supply and not matched elsewhere in the world, those in the U.S. insulin supply chain are blaming each other. Tens of thousands of medical professionals are engaged in an intricate therapeutic ballet performed to protect the health, limbs, and lives of the almost 30 million people in the U.S. suffering from diabetes.

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by zritic
    +18 +1

    Kratom to join heroin, LSD on Schedule I drug list

    Beginning September 30, kratom will be considered a Schedule I drug, a substance that has "no currently accepted medical use and a high potential for abuse," the Drug Enforcement Administration announced today. Other Schedule I drugs include heroin, LSD, marijuana and ecstasy. In this week's Federal Register, the DEA proposes designating the drug as Schedule I for up to three years. After that time, the status could be extended permanently.

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by rexall
    +52 +1

    This invention by a British student could save millions of lives across the world

    A 22-year-old British student has invented a mobile fridge that could save millions of lives across the world. Will Broadway's "Isobar" has been designed to keep vaccines at the ideal temperature while in transit in developing countries. And Will doesn't plan to make money from his creation. His focus is to get it to people who need it, which is why he won't be trying to get a patent.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by zobo
    +13 +1

    Ghost Pepper Sends Man To Hospital For 23 Days

    The ghost pepper is one of the world's hottest peppers, with a Scoville rating of more than a million. So it might follow that you shouldn't ingest it in more than tiny quantities. And yet, the Journal of Emergency Medicine reports on the unusual case of a man who tore a hole in his esophagus after eating an incredibly hot ghost pepper. The 47-year-old American ate a burger topped with a "ghost pepper puree" as part of an eating contest. YouTube is rife with video of people eating these things, so you can probably guess how this one went: The man started vomiting, profusely.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by zobo
    +6 +1

    New Portable Smartphone Laboratory Can Detect Cancer Instantly And Produces Lab Quality Results

    A research team from Washington State University, led by Lei Li, assistant professor in the School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering has developed a portable laboratory on a smartphone. Although the unit is low-cost, it produces lab quality results and can analyze several samples at once to detect a cancer biomarker.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by larylin
    +29 +1

    Prostate cancer laser treatment cures half of trial subjects

    A new prostate cancer treatment that combines lasers and deep-sea bacteria could be "truly transformative," according to a team of researchers. A trial conducted with 415 men across Europe finished with nearly half completely free of cancer compared to 13.5 percent given regular treatment. To top it off, unlike with current, aggressive therapies that can cause impotence and urinary incontinence, most of the subjects were free of side effects after two years.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by jedlicka
    +14 +1

    Something incredible just happened in Chicago

    It's being called a Christmas miracle, and it happened just in time for Christmas for one Chicago family with a sick child. The phrase “Christmas miracle” gets thrown around a lot this time of year, but what just happened to a 5-month-old boy suffering from a rare disease may qualify. Little Daniel McCabe was at Lurie Children’s Hospital in Chicago, waiting for a liver transplant that could save his life due to a rare liver disorder called biliary atresia. As it turns out, he didn’t have to wait long at all.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by baron778
    +23 +1

    NHS 'crisis': Corbyn demands answers from PM

    Jeremy Corbyn is demanding Prime Minister Theresa May comes to the Commons on Monday to set out how she plans to "fix her failure on the NHS". It comes after the head of the British Red Cross claimed the National Health Service was facing a "humanitarian crisis" due to Government cuts. Mike Adamson told Sky News he was "not trying to embarrass anyone" but hospitals are "feeling the pressure" amid "increasingly chaotic situations".

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by ckshenn
    +1 +1

    CVS Puts Out Generic Competitor To EpiPen At A 6th Of The Price

    CVS is now selling a rival, generic version of Mylan’s EpiPen at about a sixth of its price, just months after the maker of the life-saving allergy treatment was eviscerated before Congress because of its soaring cost to consumers. The drugstore chain says it will charge $109.99 for a two-pack of the authorized generic version of Adrenaclick, a lesser-known treatment compared to EpiPen, which can cost more than $600.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by Maternitus
    +14 +1

    Denmark's 29,000 Doctors Declare Circumcision of Healthy Boys an "Ethically Unacceptable" Procedure Offering no Meaningful Health Benefits

    Except within the small Muslim and orthodox Jewish communities, people in Denmark wonder why on Earth any parents would want to have their precious newborn child held down to have a part of his healthy, yet immature, penis cut off.

  • Analysis
    1 year ago
    by lostwonder
    +15 +1

    Frustrated widow wants Liberals to expand assisted dying rules

    Two years after a landmark ruling from the Supreme Court of Canada on doctor-assisted death, the widow of a man who travelled to Switzerland to end his life wants the government to ease the rules.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by roxxy
    +25 +1

    Drug maker pushes pause on $89K drug after outcry

    In an unexpected move, Marathon Pharmaceuticals announced Monday that it is pausing the roll-out of its now FDA-approved Duchenne muscular dystrophy drug—which has an $89,000-per-year list price. The announcement comes in the wake of intense outcry from patients, the public, and lawmakers over the drug’s eye-popping price, which Marathon announced last week. The drug, deflazacort, is a steroid treatment that slows the progression of Duchenne, a rare, devastating neuromuscular disorder that leaves mostly boys unable to walk by their teens (it's X-linked recessive). The disorder also shortens their lifespan to 25-30 years.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by zobo
    +35 +1

    Five HIV patients left 'virus-free' with no need for daily drugs in early vaccine trials

    A new vaccine-based treatment for HIV has succeeded in suppressing the virus in five patients, raising hopes further research could help prevent Aids without the need for daily drugs. Researchers combined two innovative HIV vaccines with a drug usually used to treat cancer in the trial, conducted over three years at the IrsiCaixa Aids Research Institute in Barcelona. After receiving the treatment, the virus was undetectable in five out of 24 participants and its spread was stopped by their immune systems...

  • Analysis
    1 year ago
    by wetwilly87
    +34 +1

    Given the choice, patients will reach for cannabis over prescribed opioids

    Chronic pain sufferers and those taking mental health meds would rather turn to cannabis instead of their prescribed opioid medication, according to a new study. “This study is one of the first to track medical cannabis use under the new system of licensed producers, meaning that all participants had physician authorization to access cannabis in addition to their prescription medicines,” says UBC Assoc. Prof. Zach Walsh, co-author of the study.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by Chubros
    +11 +1

    Rectal Marijuana Is More Effective Than Smoking Joints: Doctor

    Not all medicinal marijuana is created equal. That's what some experts are saying as they warn about the health risks and curtailed effectiveness associated with smoking medicine. As medical pot becomes increasingly mainstream and Canada moves toward legalizing the substance, health experts are emphasizing the need for doctors and patients to consider the sometimes serious side effects linked to the various ways of consuming the drug.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by rawlings
    +5 +1

    Feds cause standstill for promising marijuana cure for Alzheimer's

    Promising new research conducted last year at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies has shown that marijuana extracts may hold a key to treating Alzheimer's disease. The next step: To conduct tests on mice and, if the results are promising, move on to human trials.

  • Analysis
    1 year ago
    by wetwilly87
    +1 +1

    With a 10-day supply of opioids, 1 in 5 become long-term users

    The longer a person uses opioids, the greater the risk of forming a deadly addiction. But just how long does it take to switch from being a short-term user—say, while you’re dealing with pain after a surgery—to a long-term, potentially problematic user? A few weeks? A month? According to a new study, that transition could take just a matter of days.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by mariogi
    +26 +1

    Gun injuries cost Americans $730 million a year in hospital bills

    The total cost for initial inpatient hospitalization for firearm-related injuries was $6.6 billion. The federal government's portion was $2.7 billion.

  • Expression
    1 year ago
    by hiihii
    +11 +1

    For insect detectives, the trickiest cases involve the bugs that aren't there

    Gale Ridge could tell something was wrong as soon as the man walked into her office at the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station. He was smartly dressed in a collared shirt and slacks, but his skin didn’t look right: It was bright pink, almost purple — and weirdly glassy. Without making eye contact, he sat hunched in the chair across from Ridge and began to speak. He was an internationally renowned physician and researcher. He had taught 20 years’ worth of students, treating patients all the while, and had solved mysteries about the body’s...