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  • Expression
    2 years ago
    by dynamite
    +18 +2

    The ‘sea-nomad’ children who see like dolphins

    Unlike most people, the children of a Thailand tribe see with total clarity beneath the waves – how do they do it, and might their talent be learned? Deep in the island archipelagos on the Andaman Sea, and along the west coast of Thailand live small tribes called the Moken people, also known as sea-nomads. Their children spend much of their day in the sea, diving for food. They are uniquely adapted to this job – because...

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by drunkenninja
    +32 +2

    SeaWorld Agrees To End Captive Breeding Of Killer Whales

    In an agreement with The Humane Society of the United States, the theme park will also phase out the use of the giant marine mammals in theatrical shows.

  • Analysis
    2 years ago
    by jcscher
    +24 +1

    Bizarre Fossil Hauled its Offspring Around 'like Kites'

    Scientists who discovered the fossil have dubbed it the "kite runner".

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by Chubros
    +23 +1

    Scientists are streaming a live video feed of the Mariana Trench right NOW

    Scientists just estimated that Earth could contain as many as 1 trillion species, an incredible 99.999 percent of which are currently undiscovered. And it's a good bet that a whole lot of those mystery creatures are hiding out at the bottom of the ocean, which is just one of the reasons why this live video feed is so awesome. Stick it on at work and you could witness something no other human has ever seen before - or at the very least, you'll get scientists cracking jokes...

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by hxxp
    +28 +1

    Abandoned Tanker Mysteriously Washes Ashore in Liberia

    An abandoned oil tanker has mysteriously washed ashore in Liberia leaving officials scratching their heads as to how it got there and what exactly happened to its crew. According to local reports the vessel emblazoned with the name Tamaya 1 was discovered washed up on a beach in Robertsport, Liberia on Wednesday with no sign of any crew. AIS data from MarineTraffic.com shows the Tamaya 1 is a 63-meter oil products tanker flagged in Panama.

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by canuck
    +32 +1

    Malaysia just established a one million hectare marine park

    Malaysia has just established the biggest marine protected area (MPA) in the country. The Tun Mustapha park (TMP) occupies 1m hectares (2.47m acres) of seascape off the northern tip of Sabah province in Borneo, a region containing the second largest concentration of coral reefs in Malaysia as well as other important habitats like mangroves, sea grass beds and productive fishing grounds.

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by timex
    +10 +1

    Electric eels use 'leaping attacks' to defend themselves, study finds

    A well-known account of an epic battle between electric eels and horses, long unsubstantiated by scientific evidence, now appears more realistic thanks to new research demonstrating these aquatic creatures are capable of targeting land threats with powerful electrical shocks. The study, led by Vanderbilt University biologist Kenneth Catania and published online Monday in the Proceedings of the National...

  • Video/Audio
    2 years ago
    by 8mm
    +2 +1

    Watch these amazing octopuses stand up on two legs and run (video)

    As if they weren't remarkable enough, now we can add "prancing about on a pair of arms" to the cephalopod's impressive bag of tricks. They can virtually disappear into their surroundings and when things get rough, they can swim away with jet propulsion. So why would some species of octopus – creatures that have no bones to support their bodies – set two arms on the ground and take a bipedal-style ramble to flee from a predator?

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by TNY
    +33 +1

    Giant Clam Poaching Wipes Out Reefs in South China Sea

    More than 40 square miles (104 square kilometers) of coral reefs—some of the most biodiverse on Earth—have been destroyed by giant clam poaching in the South China Sea, according to a new analysis of satellite imagery. The poachers use boat propellers to loosen the valuable bivalves, which can weigh up to 500 pounds (227 kilograms) and are a luxury item in China. Carving up a reef leaves it barren of life. And because reefs in the region are often interconnected, the damage in one place can have repercussions elsewhere. Another 22 square miles (58 square kilometers) of reef have been destroyed by island-building activities...

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by geoleo
    +37 +2

    WWF buys shark fishing licence on Great Barrier Reef to scrap it

    A conservation group has taken the unusual step of buying a commercial shark fishing licence on the Great Barrier Reef, and will retire it, saving the sharks that it would otherwise be used to catch. WWF said it was now seeking funds to cover the cost of the $100,000 licence, which gives the owner the right to drag a 1.2km net anywhere along the length of the Great Barrier Reef, targeting sharks. It can also be used for fishing with lines to target other species.

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by aj0690
    +41 +1

    Whales Mourn Their Dead, Just Like Us

    Smart and often sociable, whales forge tight bonds with one another. Now it’s clear that those bonds can be stronger than death itself. More than six species of the marine mammals have been seen clinging to the body of a dead compatriot, probably a podmate or relative, scientists say in a new study. The most likely explanation for the animals’ refusal to let go of the corpses: grief. “They are mourning,” says study co-author Melissa Reggente, a biologist at the University of Milano-Bicocca in Italy. “They are in pain and stressed. They know something is wrong.”

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by grandtheftsoul
    +27 +1

    SeaWorld shares sink to record low as attendance keeps falling

    SeaWorld shares sank to a record low on Thursday after the controversial aquatic theme park company reported further falls in attendance and profits. The company, which induces killer whales, dolphins and sea lions to perform tricks to entertain the public, said 494,000 fewer people visited its parks in the three months to the end of June compared with the same period a year earlier. The 7.7% drop in attendance, from 6.5 to six million, knocked more than $16m off SeaWorld’s quarterly earnings and spooked analysts...

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by TNY
    +34 +2

    Talk About An Ancient Mariner! Greenland Shark Is At Least 272 Years Old

    Sharks can live to be at least 272 years old in the Arctic seas, and scientists say one recently caught shark may have lived as long as 512 years. That's according to a study published Thursday in the journal Science that says Greenland sharks can live longer than any other known animal advanced enough to have a backbone. Until now, the record-holder for the oldest vertebrate was the bowhead whale, known to have lived up to 211 years.

  • Video/Audio
    2 years ago
    by geoleo
    +23 +2

    Dolphin Steals Woman's iPad

    A playful dolphin at SeaWorld in Orlando grabbed a woman's iPad right out of her hands while she was taking a picture. The visitor got her iPad back -- but not before getting splashed!

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by jcscher
    +8 +1

    Obama Creates the Largest Protected Place on the Planet, Off Hawaii

    Expansion of 2006 monument will protect rare corals, fish, birds and marine mammals

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by jedlicka
    +58 +2

    Dolphins recorded having a conversation 'just like two people' for first time

    Two dolphins have been recorded having a conversation for the first time after scientists developed an underwater microphone which could distinguish the animals' different "voices". Researchers have known for decades that the mammals had an advanced form of communication, using distinctive clicks and whistles to show they are excited, happy, stressed or separated from the group.

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by jedlicka
    0 +1

    Scientists discover dolphins 'can speak almost like humans'

    Dolphins are capable of “highly developed spoken language” which closely resembles human communication, scientists have suggested. While it has long been acknowledged dolphins are of high intelligence and can communicate within a larger pack, their ability to converse with each other individually has been less understood. But researchers at the Karadag Nature Reserve, Feodosia, Crimea, believe the pulses, clicks and whistles – of up to five “words” – made by dolphins are listened to fully by another before a response is made.

  • Analysis
    2 years ago
    by rexall
    +22 +1

    Stingrays Chew? Who Knew?

    Plenty of animals bite, but mammals were once thought to be the only ones to chew, at least as it’s usually defined: moving our toothy jaws up, down, and side to side to tear through tough food. But chew on this: the ocellate river stingray, a beautiful spotted fish from the Amazon River, also chews its food. The discovery not only demonstrates that chewing isn’t special to mammals, but explains how rays, whose skeletons are made of soft cartilage rather than bone, can eat tough prey like shellfish.

  • Video/Audio
    2 years ago
    by geoleo
    +28 +2

    GoPro Awards: Soaring with Orcas

    Captured and submitted by GoPro Awards recipient Andreas Heide, who was joined by a pod of Orcas while riding his Subwing off the coast of Norway.

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by socialiguana
    +24 +1

    Protect dolphins, UK government urged

    Campaigners are demanding better safeguards for the UK's marine mammals after the EU said it would take Britain to court over harbour porpoises. The European Commission announced the action because it says the UK is failing to protect the endangered animals properly. The government is yet to comment on the court action. But the Wildlife Trusts are urging ministers to declare many more Marine Conservation Zones (MCZs).

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by hxxp
    +23 +1

    China's 'extinct' dolphin may have returned to Yangtze river, say conservationists

    Chinese conservationists believe they may have caught a rare glimpse of a freshwater dolphin that was declared functionally extinct a decade ago having graced the Yangtze river for 20 million years. Scientists and environmentalists had appeared to abandon hope that China’s baiji, or white dolphin, could survive as a species after they failed to find a single animal during a fruitless six-week hunt along the 6,300-km (3,915-mile) waterway in 2006.

  • Expression
    2 years ago
    by lostwonder
    +6 +1

    Obituary: Great Barrier Reef (25 Million BC-2016)

    Climate change and ocean acidification have killed off one of the most spectacular features on the planet.

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by canuck
    +23 +1

    Ocean algae blooms earlier, with potential ripple effects to come

    Warmer oceans are acting like a catalyst for one of the world's most abundant species of plankton, triggering earlier blooms of blue-green algae in the waters of the North Atlantic. Because of plankton's fundamental role in the marine ecosystem, researchers expect this shift to have far-reaching impacts throughout the world's oceans. The study, published in the journal Science, focused on Synechococcus, a type of blue-green algae that is one of the most abundant phytoplankton in the ocean. The authors drew on 13 years worth of data to measure the spring blooms that cover the North Atlantic in a carpet of green each year.

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by funhonestdude
    +38 +1

    Starfish are dying out in the Pacific – and no-one is quite sure why

    Starfish are dying out on the Pacific Coast from Mexico to Alaska – and no-one is quite sure why. The problem has been documented among starfish, or sea stars as they are also known, that live along the Pacific shore before. But a new study has found species which live below the low tide mark are also being severely affected.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by lexi6
    +8 +1

    Sperm Whales Found Dead In Germany, Stomachs FULL Of Plastic And Car Parts

    In January, 29 sperm whales were found stranded on shores around the North Sea, an area that is too shallow for the marine wildlife. Only recently were details of the animals’ necropsy released. However, scientists were deeply disturbed by what they found in the animals’ stomachs. According to a press release from Wadden Sea National Park in Schleswig-Holstein, many of the whales had stomachs FULL of plastic debris, including a 13-meter-long fishing net, a 70 cm piece of plastic from a car and other pieces of plastic litter.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by messi
    +31 +1

    Mercury levels drop in Atlantic bluefin tuna

    Pollution can seem like a vague, general problem, but sometimes it is specific and personal. People with asthma living in some major cities know to keep tabs on the ozone report in the weather forecast, for example. And frequent anglers should be keenly aware of how much of their catch they put on the dinner table because of mercury contamination in fish. Mercury is a problem for marine fish, as well—particularly the ever-popular tuna.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by hedman
    +12 +1

    Stop eating sushi. Immediately

    Healthy, convenient and increasingly popular over the past few years, sushi has become as common a cuisine in the UK as Indian or Chinese. It’s a staple lunch-choice for city-workers all over the country and you’re never far from a restaurant or supermarket selling the traditional Japanese delicacy. But it turns out sushi may not be as wholesome a choice as we previously thought – leading biologists have warned that it is in fact harming both the environment and our health.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by TNY
    +23 +1

    650 whales stranded on New Zealand coast

    A new pod of 240 whales swam aground at a remote New Zealand beach on Saturday just hours after weary volunteers managed to refloat a different group of whales following an earlier mass stranding. In total, more than 650 pilot whales have beached themselves along a 5 kilometer (3 mile) stretch of coastline over two days on Farewell Spit at the tip of the South Island. About 335 of the whales are dead, 220 remain stranded, and 100 are back at sea.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by messi
    +28 +1

    Oil disaster will halve dolphin population say St Andrews researchers

    An international study involving researchers at St Andrews has revealed dolphins are struggling to survive seven years after the Deepwater Horizon disaster. In April 2010 a blowout on the drilling rig resulted in 134 million gallons of oil being released into the Gulf of Mexico over an 87-day period, killing thousands of marine mammals including bottlenose dolphins.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by TNY
    +27 +1

    The Winning Photos of Underwater Photographer of the Year 2017

    The international Underwater Photographer of the Year photo contest has announced its winners for the 2017 edition. The winning photo (shown above) was by French photographer Gabriel Barathieu, who captured a “Dancing Octopus” in a lagoon on the island of Mayotte in the Indian Ocean. Barathieu’s photo was selected from over 4,500 underwater photos entered by photographers based in 67 different countries around the world.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by aj0690
    +15 +1

    Before Vaquitas Vanish, a Desperate Bid to Save Them

    In the shallow sea waters of the Gulf of California swims a porpoise that few have seen, its numbers dwindling so fast that its very existence is now in peril. Known mostly by its Spanish name, the snub-nosed vaquita is the world’s smallest cetacean, a miniature porpoise with a cartoonlike features and dark smudges around its eyes. The species lives only in the fertile waters of the gulf’s northern corner. The size of its population has always been precarious, but now voracious demand in China for a fish that shares the vaquita’s only habitat has pushed the tiny porpoise to the brink of extinction.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by 66bnats
    +1 +1

    Scientists Race to Prevent Wipeout of World's Coral Reefs

    There were startling colors here just a year ago, a dazzling array of life beneath the waves. Now this Maldivian reef is dead, killed by the stress of rising ocean temperatures. What's left is a haunting expanse of gray, a scene repeated in reefs across the globe in what has fast become a full-blown ecological catastrophe.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by roxxy
    +24 +1

    Humpback whales are organizing in huge numbers, and no one knows why

    The world is ending and only the whales know. At least, that’s one explanation. Humpback whales are normally pretty solitary—scientists used to call groups of 10 to 20 “large.” Now they’re congregating in groups of 20 to 200 off the coast of South Africa. Something is definitely going on here, but so far experts are stumped.

  • Analysis
    1 year ago
    by lostwonder
    +18 +1

    Great Barrier Reef obit maybe not so premature

    ENVIRONMENT -- I took a lot of grief and criticism in October from around the world, perhaps not totally undeserved, for promoting an obituary for the Great Barrier Reef. This week, the science journal Nature and The New York Times are suggesting the notion isn't...

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by larylin
    +22 +1

    Oil drilling in Maui dolphin habitat threatens species

    There are fears a decision to allow oil drilling off the Taranaki coast could spell disaster for New Zealand's rare Māui dolphins. Thirty-five percent of the dolphins' habitat is to be opened up to exploration, and Green Party MP Gareth Hughes says it's a reckless move. "We're talking about more than 2000km squared. We know that the seismic surveys, the oil rigs, the risk of oil spills could be catastrophic for the species.