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  • Analysis
    1 year ago
    by wetwilly87
    +21 +1

    More intelligent people are quicker to learn (and unlearn) social stereotypes

    Smart people tend to perform better at work, earn more money, be physically healthier, and be less likely to subscribe to authoritarian beliefs. But a new paper reveals that a key aspect of intelligence – a strong “pattern-matching” ability, which helps someone readily learn a language, understand how another person is feeling or spot a stock market trend to exploit – has a darker side: it also makes that person more likely to learn and apply social stereotypes.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by 66bnats
    +20 0

    How America Helped Make Vladimir Putin Dictator for Life

    It is impossible to evaluate events in Russia today without understanding the mysterious series of bombings in 1999 that killed 300 civilians and created the conditions for Vladimir Putin to become Russia’s dictator for life. The bombings changed the course of Russia’s post-Soviet history. They were blamed on the Chechens, who denied involvement. In the wake of initial success, Russia launched a new invasion of Chechnya. Putin, who had just been appointed prime minister...

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by grandtheftsoul
    +3 +1

    Congressman Rohrabacher Wants Julian Assange to Get a White House Press Pass

    Rohrabacher recently returned from a London meeting with Assange, and is reportedly trying to negotiate a deal with the White House which would allow Assange out of his house arrest.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by Chubros
    +16 +1

    NSA Quietly Awarded a Classified $2.4 Billion Tech Contract With More to Come

    The National Security Agency has awarded tech firm CSRA the first of three portions of its classified Groundbreaker contract, which could potentially be worth as much as $2.4 billion over the next decade if all options are exercised. CSRA announced the award through a Securities and Exchange Commission filing, where it acknowledged the value and duration of the contract without naming the customer agency or the contract’s name. Neither CSRA nor NSA offered comment to Nextgov for this story.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by geoleo
    +2 +1

    Pressure mounts on Facebook to release campaign ads bought by Russia

    A campaign finance reform group, accusing Facebook of being used as an “accomplice” in a Russian influence scheme, is calling on company chairman Mark Zuckerberg to reverse his position and publicly release “secretly-sponsored” Russian political ads that ran on its platform during last year’s presidential

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by Apolatia
    +12 +1

    Cuba mystery: What theories US investigators are pursuing

    There must be an answer. Whatever is harming U.S. diplomats in Havana, it’s eluded the doctors, scientists and intelligence analysts scouring for answers. Investigators have chased many theories, including a sonic attack, electromagnetic weapon or flawed spying device. Each explanation seems to fit parts of what’s happened, conflicting with others. The United States doesn’t even know what to call it. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson used the phrase “health attacks.” The State Department prefers “incidents.”

  • Analysis
    1 year ago
    by geoleo
    +4 +1

    Analytic thinking undermines religious belief while intelligence undermines social conservatism, study suggests

    Religion and politics appear to be related to different aspects of cognition, according to new psychological research. Religion is more related to quick, intuitive thinking while politics is more related to intelligence. The study, which was published in the scientific journal Personality and Individual Differences, found evidence that religious people tend to be less reflective while social conservatives tend to have lower cognitive ability.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by timex
    +2 +1

    Obama tried to give Zuckerberg a wake-up call over fake news on Facebook

    Nine days after Facebook chief executive Mark Zuckerberg dismissed as “crazy” the idea that fake news on his company’s social network played a key role in the U.S. election, President Barack Obama pulled the youthful tech billionaire aside and delivered what he hoped would be a wake-up call. For months leading up to the vote, Obama and his top aides quietly agonized over how to respond to Russia’s brazen intervention on behalf of the Donald Trump campaign without making matters worse.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by hiihii
    +16 +1

    The confrontation that fueled the fallout between Kaspersky and the U.S. government

    The United States’ hostile relationship with Moscow-based cybersecurity firm Kaspersky Lab may have been partially shaped by an incident two years ago in which an eyebrow-raising Kaspersky sales pitch eventually led to a secret and previously undisclosed confrontation between Russian intelligence and the CIA. The confrontation, which ended in Russia’s domestic intelligence agency issuing a diplomatic démarche, was the result of the U.S. government’s intrusive treatment of the...

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by rexall
    +1 +1

    CIA ‘working to take down’ WikiLeaks threat, agency chief says

    The head of the CIA lumped WikiLeaks with al Qaeda and the Islamic State and said his agency is working toward reducing the “enormous threat” posed by each of them. CIA Director Mike Pompeo placed the antisecrecy website in the same category as terrorist organizations while speaking Thursday at the Foundation for the Defense of Democracies’ National Security Summit in D.C.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by messi
    +20 +1

    Judge rebukes handling of JFK records

    The federal judge who oversaw the collection of government documents on John F. Kennedy's assassination called it "disappointing" that President Donald Trump is holding back so many of the records while the CIA, FBI and other agencies review them. "I just don't think there is anything in these records that require keeping them secret now," John Tunheim, who from 1992 to 1998 chaired a congressionally established board that reviewed all the files on the assassination...

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by TentativePrince
    +23 +1

    How Russia hacked the world: Putin's spies used 'digital hit list' to hunt global targets

    The hackers who upended the US presidential election had ambitions well beyond Hillary Clinton's campaign, targeting the emails of Ukrainian officers, Russian opposition figures, US defence contractors and thousands of others of interest to the Kremlin, according to a previously unpublished digital hit list obtained by The Associated Press.

  • Analysis
    1 year ago
    by Maternitus
    +31 +1

    Security Breach and Spilled Secrets Have Shaken the N.S.A. to Its Core

    A serial leak of the agency’s cyberweapons has damaged morale, slowed intelligence operations and resulted in hacking attacks on businesses and civilians worldwide.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by geoleo
    +6 +1

    Security Breach and Spilled Secrets Have Shaken the N.S.A. to Its Core

    Jake Williams awoke last April in an Orlando, Fla., hotel where he was leading a training session. Checking Twitter, the cybersecurity expert was dismayed to discover that he had been thrust into the middle of one of the worst security debacles ever to befall American intelligence. Mr. Williams had written on his company blog about the Shadow Brokers, a mysterious group that had somehow obtained many of the hacking tools the United States used to spy on other countries. Now the group had replied in an angry screed on Twitter.

  • Analysis
    1 year ago
    by messi
    +20 +1

    Very intelligent people make less effective leaders, according to their peers and subordinates

    Highly intelligent people tend to make good progress in the workplace and are seen as fit for leadership roles: overall, smarter is usually associated with success. But if you examine the situation more closely, as does new research in the Journal of Applied Psychology, you find evidence that too much intelligence can harm leadership effectiveness. Too clever for your own good? Let’s look at the research.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by sauce
    +15 +1

    RT says the Kremlin doesn't own it, but won't say who does

    The company that owns and runs the U.S. operations of the RT website and television channel filed paperwork Monday registering with the Justice Department as a foreign agent — a step the U.S. said was necessary in order for the media outlet to continue operating in the country. In its filing, RT did not identify who in fact owned the company, The Wall Street Journal reported.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by larylin
    +12 +1

    Why FBI Can’t Tell All on Trump, Russia

    The FBI cannot tell us what we need to know about Trump's contacts with Russia. Why? Because doing so would jeopardize a long-running, ultra-sensitive operation targeting mobsters tied to Putin — and to Trump. But the Feds’ stonewalling risks something far more dangerous: Failing to resolve a crisis of trust in America’s president. WhoWhatWhy provides the details of a two-month investigation in this 6,500-word exposé.

  • Expression
    1 year ago
    by aj0690
    +32 +1

    Fake news and botnets: how Russia weaponised the web

    The digital attack that brought Estonia to a standstill 10 years ago was the first shot in a cyberwar that has been raging between Moscow and the west ever since.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by geoleo
    +8 +1

    Operative Offered Trump Campaign ‘Kremlin Connection’ Using N.R.A. Ties

    A conservative operative trumpeting his close ties to the National Rifle Association and Russia told a Trump campaign adviser last year that he could arrange a back-channel meeting between Donald J. Trump and Vladimir V. Putin, the Russian president, according to an email sent to the Trump campaign.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by Chubros
    +18 +1

    WikiLeaks faces U.S. probes into its 2016 election role and CIA leaks: sources

    WikiLeaks and its founder, Julian Assange, are facing multiple investigations by U.S. authorities, including three congressional probes and a federal criminal inquiry, sources familiar with the investigations said. The Senate and House of Representatives intelligence committees and leaders of the Senate Judiciary Committee are probing the website’s role in the 2016 U.S. presidential election campaign, according to the sources, who all requested anonymity, and public documents.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by jedlicka
    +2 +1

    Email shows effort to give docs to Trump camp

    Candidate Donald Trump, his son Donald Trump Jr. and others in the Trump Organization received an email in September 2016 offering a decryption key and website address for hacked WikiLeaks documents, according to an email provided to congressional investigators. The September 4 email was sent during the final stretch of the 2016 presidential race -- on the same day that Trump Jr. first tweeted about WikiLeaks and Clinton.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by hiihii
    +12 +1

    Email shows effort to give docs to Trump camp

    Donald Trump, his son and others received an email in September 2016 offering a decryption key and website address for hacked WikiLeaks documents, according to an email provided to congressional investigators.

  • Analysis
    1 year ago
    by ckshenn
    +51 +1

    Bad News for the Highly Intelligent

    Superior IQs associated with mental and physical disorders, research suggests.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by larylin
    +18 +1

    Alpha Zero’s “Alien” Chess Shows the Power, and the Peculiarity, of AI

    The latest AI program developed by DeepMind is not only brilliant and remarkably flexible—it’s also quite weird. DeepMind published a paper this week describing a game-playing program it developed that proved capable of mastering chess and the Japanese game Shoju, having already mastered the game of Go. Demis Hassabis, the founder and CEO of DeepMind and an expert chess player himself, presented further details of the system, called Alpha Zero, at an AI conference in California on Thursday. The program often made moves that would seem unthinkable to a human chess player.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by jasont
    +17 +1

    Putin Gets Reports on Trump’s Tweets, Kremlin Says

    Russian President Vladimir Putin receives reports of U.S. counterpart Donald Trump’s tweets because they’re considered to be official White House statements, Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov said. Everything Trump posts on his Twitter account “is regarded in Moscow as his official statements,” Peskov told reporters on a conference call Tuesday. “Obviously, it’s reported to President Putin, along with other information about the official statements of politicians and heads of state from other countries.”

  • Current Event
    11 months ago
    by bradd
    +16 +1

    Ukraine may have just sniffed out two Russian spies among its ranks

    Ukraine’s security services (SBU) arrested two different men suspected of spying for Russia, one working for the cabinet of ministers, another serving in Kiev’s own intelligence ranks, within 24 hours of each other. "As we speak, the illegal activity of another citizen of Ukraine who acted against the national interest and for Russia’s intelligence services, is being documented,” Vitaly Mayakov, the deputy head of Ukraine’s main investigative department said Thursday.

  • Analysis
    11 months ago
    by doodlegirl
    +13 +1

    The Story of Reality Winner, America’s Most Unlikely Leaker

    Reality Winner grew up in a carefully kept manufactured home on the edge of a cattle farm 100 miles north of the Mexican border in a majority-Latino town where her mother, Billie, still lives. From the back porch, a carpet of green meets the horizon, and when a neighbor shoots a gun for target practice, a half-dozen local dogs run under the trailer to hide. Billie worked for Child Protective Services, and in Ricardo, Texas, the steady income made her daughters feel well-off; the fact that they had a dishwasher seemed evidence of elevated social standing.

  • Current Event
    11 months ago
    by TentativePrince
    +9 +1

    Russian involvement in MH17 crash proved 'beyond doubt', say spies

    British spies believe that it is proved "beyond any reasonable doubt" that the missile launcher that downed the MH17 jet over Ukraine in 2014 was supplied and later removed by Russia. The disclosure is contained in a short paragraph buried in the annual report of parliament's Intelligence and Security Committee, spotted by Bellingcat, an investigative site that has worked extensively on the Ukraine conflict.

  • Expression
    11 months ago
    by zritic
    +16 +1

    Who serves whom?

    The takeover of artificial intelligence seems to be a done deal. The open questions are: When will machines outperform us? Will they annihilate us? And: Should self-driving cars kill one pregnant woman or two Nobel prize winners? Artificial Intelligence is a complex riddle for all sorts of experts. It’s full of magic, mystery, money, mind-boggling techno-ethical paradoxes and sci-fi dilemmas that may or may not affect us in some far or near future.

  • Current Event
    11 months ago
    by zyery
    +18 0

    'Very high level of confidence' Russia used Kaspersky software for devastating NSA leaks

    Three months after U.S. officials asserted that Russian intelligence used popular antivirus company Kaspersky to steal U.S. classified information, there are indications that the alleged espionage is related to a public campaign of highly damaging NSA leaks by a mysterious group called the Shadow Brokers.

  • Current Event
    11 months ago
    by zritic
    +15 +1

    Ex-C.I.A. Officer Suspected of Compromising Chinese Informants Is Arrested

    The arrest of the former agent, Jerry Chun Shing Lee, 53, capped an intense F.B.I. investigation that began around 2012 after the C.I.A. began losing its agents in China.

  • Current Event
    11 months ago
    by aj0690
    +19 +1

    EU accuses Russia of 'orchestrated' disinformation campaign

    The European Union on Wednesday accused Russia of pumping out thousands of pieces of disinformation in an "orchestrated strategy" aimed at destabilising the bloc. Russia faces a barrage of accusations of interfering in a string of seismic political events, including the British vote to leave the European Union, the US election of President Donald Trump and the Catalan independence crisis.

  • Current Event
    10 months ago
    by socialiguana
    +13 +1

    Trump campaign aide Carter Page may have been a Russian agent, a secret memo reveals

    President Donald Trump’s Justice Department had reason to suspect that former Trump campaign associate Carter Page was a Russian agent, according to a Republican memo. The contentious and secret memo, allegedly created by Republicans to discredit the investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential election, shows that Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein approved an application to continue surveillance of Page, sources told The New York Times.

  • Current Event
    10 months ago
    by ubthejudge
    +15 +1

    Russian hackers hunt hi-tech secrets, exploiting US weakness

    Russian cyberspies pursuing the secrets of military drones and other sensitive U.S. defense technology tricked key contract workers into exposing their email to theft, an Associated Press investigation has found. What ultimately may have been stolen is uncertain, but the hackers clearly exploited a national vulnerability in cybersecurity: poorly protected email and barely any direct notification to victims.

  • Current Event
    10 months ago
    by sasky
    +20 +1

    Jeremy Corbyn knew I was a spy and was a Cold War source, says Czech 'diplomat' 

    The Czechoslovak secret agent who met Jeremy Corbyn during the Eighties claimed last night that the Labour leader knew he was a spy and said the MP had supplied information to the Communist regime.