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  • Current Event
    10 hours ago
    by sauce
    +13 +2

    This tiny Bluetooth chip doesn’t need a battery because it harvests energy from the air

    The Internet of Things promises to connect billions of otherwise ordinary devices to the internet, but when each one needs to have its own battery, there’s a limit to how small or cheap they can become. A new paper-thin Bluetooth chip that’s able to operate entirely without a battery could be about to solve this problem. The postage stamp-sized chip from Wiliot is able to harvest energy from the ambient radio frequencies around us, such as Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, and cellular signals, and use them to power a Bluetooth-equipped ARM processor that can be connected to a variety of sensors.

  • Current Event
    2 days ago
    by TNY
    +16 +7

    Elon Musk Is Giving My Generation Its Future Back. Let's Not Lose It Again

    Like many, I’ve been watching the developments in Boca Chica, Texas, with great interest. SpaceX, one of Elon Musk’s companies, is building the “Starship Hopper,” a shorter and simpler version of a spacecraft that could revolutionize space travel. Seeing images of the mostly complete test vehicle, clad in shiny stainless steel, makes me feel like a kid again. These are exciting times to be alive. We are at the beginning stages of the electric car revolution. We have access to much of the knowledge of our species at our fingertips. Rockets are being launched, and they mostly return to the ground for the next adventure.

  • Current Event
    4 days ago
    by ppp
    +14 +4

    The Geopolitics of 2069 Are Crazier Than You Can Imagine

    People say we’re about to enter the “Asian century.” That would be true if the world still did centuries. But it doesn’t; change driven by technological advancements now comes so rapidly and with such force that it’s challenging to know what the next year of geopolitics will look like, let alone the next 50.

  • Analysis
    4 days ago
    by grandsalami
    +21 +5

    The plan to make artificial meteor showers

    Is this the start of ‘orbital entertainment’?

  • Analysis
    6 days ago
    by aj0690
    +44 +8

    3D-printed guns may be more dangerous to their users than targets

    Manufacturing errors, undetected by inexpert consumers, may be more dangerous than other threats from 3D-printed guns.

  • Expression
    7 days ago
    by TNY
    +15 +4

    8 Predictions for What the World Will Look Like in 20 Years

    This month, we are all tentatively dipping our toes into the New Year, wondering what horrors and highlights might await us in 2019 — the year that served as a setting, you may remember, for Blade Runner, Akira, and Running Man, three of the most iconic future-casting movies ever made and now divergent choose-your-own-dystopia visions of the years ahead (perhaps some more plausible than others).

  • Analysis
    8 days ago
    by thedevil
    +21 +5

    Bill Gates Just Published a Letter Urging US Leaders to Embrace Nuclear Energy

    Think your New Year's resolution to hit the gym is daunting? Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates wants to change an entire nation's energy policy in 2019.

  • Analysis
    6 days ago
    by Apolatia
    +23 +3

    Before Electric Cars Takes Over, Someone Needs to Reinvent the Battery

    Solid-state technology could help speed the demise of the combustion-engine car.

  • Current Event
    8 days ago
    by drunkenninja
    +25 +4

    Foldimate’s laundry-folding machine actually works now

    Back in 2018, Foldimate was one of two laundry-folding machines exhibiting at CES that promised to make folding clothes a thing of the past. It was up against Laundroid, a $16,000 AI-powered machine that was supposed to analyze each clothing item and figure out the best way to fold it using AI. Neither machine worked at the time— Foldimate’s model was a non-working prototype, and I accidentally broke the Laundroid when I confused the machine’s AI with a black T-shirt. This year, Foldimate is the sole laundry-folding machine at CES, returning for the third time with a fully working prototype.

  • Expression
    6 days ago
    by jerrycan
    +22 +2

    Bots, britches, and bees

    Bill Gates visited a Harvard University lab and saw some incredible creations that are powerful examples of the exciting innovation underway in the field of robotics.

  • Expression
    11 days ago
    by Apolatia
    +34 +4

    The fate of self-driving cars hangs on a $7 trillion design problem

    Waymo One is the world’s first self-driving taxi service. Just two rides in, and we’re already bored of the future.

  • Current Event
    2 weeks ago
    by ubthejudge
    +33 +6

    In 2018, Google DeepMind Imbued A.I. With Human-Like Sight and Imagination

    Humans can do a lot with a little context. If you see a picture of a toilet, you’ll know it’s probably flanked by a bathtub and sink. The picture didn’t include any of that stuff, but the human brain has a knack for filling in missing pieces. And now thanks to Google DeepMind computer scientists, so does artificial intelligence. In a paper published in Science Magazine in June, the company described how it created a Generative Query Network (GQN) that can see and imagine almost like a human.

  • Current Event
    13 days ago
    by rawlings
    +18 +5

    Manned Mars mission 'reality-TV event' plans 2032 launch; astronauts will have 'no return ticket'

    Landing a spot on Mars One's planned rocket to the red planet isn't easy. The selection process has been going on for five years already. After three rounds, 4,200 applicants -- "from architect to janitor," Politico points out -- have been whittled down to an even 100. No more than 24 Earthlings ultimately will be chosen to transform themselves into Martians.

  • Current Event
    13 days ago
    by ppp
    +15 +4

    2018 Was the Year That Tech Put Limits on AI

    For the past several years, giant tech companies have rapidly ramped up investments in artificial intelligence and machine learning. They’ve competed intensely to hire more AI researchers and used that talent to rush out smarter virtual assistants and more powerful facial recognition. In 2018, some of those companies moved to put some guardrails around AI technology. The most prominent example is Google, which announced constraints on its use of AI after two projects triggered public pushback and an employee revolt.

  • Current Event
    2 weeks ago
    by ubthejudge
    +18 +5

    Musk vs. Bezos: The Battle of the Space Billionaires Heats Up

    The commercial space business has blossomed over the past decade. Two companies, though, have grabbed the spotlight, emerging as the most ambitious of them all: Blue Origin and SpaceX. At first glance, these two companies look a lot alike. They are both led by billionaires who became wealthy from the Internet: Jeff Bezos of Blue Origin earned his fortune from Amazon.com, and Elon Musk of SpaceX got rich initially from Web-based businesses, notably PayPal.

  • Current Event
    2 weeks ago
    by Petrox
    +19 +6

    Connected cars accelerate down data-collection highway

    That holiday trip over the river and through the woods to grandmother’s house could turn into nice little gift for automakers as they increasingly collect oodles and oodles of data about the driver. Automakers are collecting valuable pieces of information thanks to the internet connections, cameras and sensors built into most vehicles in recent years. The online access makes it possible for cars to be unlocked remotely if the keys are lost.

  • Current Event
    2 weeks ago
    by mariogi
    +26 +3

    AI Will Create Millions More Jobs Than It Will Destroy. Here's How

    In the past few years, artificial intelligence has advanced so quickly that it now seems hardly a month goes by without a newsworthy AI breakthrough. In areas as wide-ranging as speech translation, medical diagnosis, and gameplay, we have seen computers outperform humans in startling ways. This has sparked a discussion about how AI will impact employment. Some fear that as AI improves, it will supplant workers, creating an ever-growing pool of unemployable humans who cannot compete economically with machines.

  • Current Event
    3 weeks ago
    by jerrycan
    +26 +8

    Unmanned grocery delivery is underway in Arizona

    Kroger is headed for the driverless delivery express lane, announcing Tuesday that it is now ready to begin deliveries

  • Current Event
    3 weeks ago
    by geoleo
    +25 +8

    Artificial intelligence makers wrestle with the politics of their inventions

    Earlier this month, Ed Felten — a Princeton professor and former adviser to President Obama — chided an international audience of artificial intelligence experts packing a cavernous Montreal convention center. What he's saying: For too long, AI hands have been hiding in their basements, in effect playing God by deciding which technology is ultimately released to the masses, Felten said. Stop assuming that you know what's best for people, he admonished his listeners...

  • Expression
    3 weeks ago
    by zobo
    +17 +5

    If we want to solve the world's problems, we first need to abolish all borders

    “Nations will revert to their natural tendency of hiding behind their borders, of moving towards protectionism, of listening to vested interests, and they’ll forget about transcending those national priorities,” said Christine Lagarde, the managing director of the International Monetary Fund back in 2013.

  • Current Event
    2 weeks ago
    by hedman
    +14 +3

    Norway's EV Incentives Have Worked. Now What?

    No other country on Earth has bet as big on electric vehicles as Norway, and it’s finally paying off. Half of all new cars sold to Norwegians are either fully electric or hybrid, making the country of 5.3 million the biggest per-capita market for EVs. Norway’s EV success is owed to both the carrot and the stick.

  • Current Event
    3 weeks ago
    by wildcat
    +22 +5

    This robot picks a pepper in 24 seconds using a tiny saw, and could help combat farm labor shortage

    To pick a single pepper takes about 24 seconds, though the researchers say they purposefully slowed down the robot's movements for safety reasons. Sweeper is also equipped with LED lights so that it can work regardless of the time of day, for about 20 hours/day. Still, the robot is far from perfect, with only 61 percent accuracy in picking ripe fruit.

  • Current Event
    2 weeks ago
    by messi
    +21 +2

    What made solar panels so cheap? Thank government policy.

    From an economic perspective, the core challenge of climate change is that the standard way of doing things — the dirty, carbon-intensive way — is typically cheaper than newer, lower-carbon alternatives. Solving the problem means driving down the cost of those alternatives. Simple, right? But in practice, it’s not so simple. In fact, we still don’t have a very good grasp on exactly what drives technological innovation and improvement. Is it basic scientific research? Early-stage R&D? Learning by doing? Economies of scale?

  • Expression
    1 month ago
    by belangermira
    +18 +7

    The chef that can make a gourmet burger every 30 seconds

    Robots that grill meat, slice tomatoes, stir-fry vegetables and stretch pizza dough are making fast food even faster, but can you trust a chef who's never tasted the food it creates? There is a distinct lack of chopping, smoke, sweating or swearing in the kitchen at Creator, a new burger restaurant in San Francisco. Instead, there is faint whirring and, if you really listen, the muffled sound of grinding and distant sizzling. It’s because the chefs here are not human.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by Chubros
    +26 +5

    Supertall skyscraper hangs from orbiting asteroid in Clouds Architecture Office concept

    In a bid to get around terrestrial height restrictions, Clouds Architecture Office has proposed suspending the world's tallest skyscraper from an asteroid, leaving residents to parachute to earth. New York-based Clouds Architecture Office drew up plans for Analemma Tower to "overturn the established skyscraper typology" by building not up from the ground but down from the sky by affixing the foundations to an orbiting asteroid.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by wildcat
    +13 +6

    Virgin Galactic flies its first astronauts to the edge of space, one step closer to space tourism

    The two pilots on board Virgin Galactic's spacecraft Unity became the company's first astronauts. Virgin Group founder Richard Branson was on hand to watch the historic moment. Virgin Galactic said the test flight reached an altitude of 51.4 miles, or nearly 83 kilometers. The U.S. military and NASA consider pilots who have flown above 80 kilometers to be astronauts. Test pilots in 2004 were awarded a commercial astronaut badge by the Federal Aviation Administration for flying a previous, experimental iteration of Virgin Galactic's spacecraft design.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by TNY
    +21 +4

    MIT invents method to shrink objects to nanoscale

    Some say bigger is better, but researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology will tell you that when it comes to tech, smaller things are far more impressive. This month, MIT researchers announced they invented a way to shrink objects to nanoscale -- smaller than what you can see with a microscope -- using a laser. That means they can take any simple structure and reduce it to one 1,000th of its original size.

  • Current Event
    3 weeks ago
    by socialiguana
    +21 +3

    President Trump has signed a $1.2 billon law to boost US quantum tech

    The new National Quantum Initiative Act will give America a national masterplan for advancing quantum technologies. The news: The US president just signed into law a bill that commits the government to providing $1.2 billion to fund activities promoting quantum information science over an initial five-year period. The new law, which was signed just as a partial US government shutdown began, will provide a significant boost to research, and to efforts to develop a future quantum workforce in the country.

  • Current Event
    3 weeks ago
    by wildcard
    +25 +3

    Can an “AI Physicist” Outperform Einstein?

    Physics is an important scientific field—it is a fundamental science with principles that impacts other branches of natural sciences. It explains the nature and properties of matter, energy, motion and force. The laws of physics have real-world relevance, and are deployed into products and services used in everyday modern living. Ranging from cars, airplanes, smartphones, headphones, to see-saws in a playground, the laws of physics impact the way we live.

  • Current Event
    11 days ago
    by wildcat
    +13 +1

    Artificial intelligence and bias: Four key challenges

    John Villasenor discusses the sources of bias in artificial intelligence, how to identify instances of bias, and what can be done to mitigate it.

  • Analysis
    1 month ago
    by Apolatia
    +31 +9

    How to Control a Machine with Your Brain

    A neuroscientist’s research into the mysteries of motion helps a paralyzed woman escape her body.

  • Review
    1 month ago
    by bkool
    +36 +6

    The Electric Airplane Revolution May Come Sooner Than You Think

    Eviation’s Alice is an all-electric, nine-person aircraft that may help replace fossil fuel-burning commuter planes.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by rexall
    +19 +6

    Transparent Solar Technology ‘Wave of the Future’

    See-through solar materials that can be applied to windows represent a massive source of untapped energy and could harvest as much power as bigger, bulkier rooftop solar units, scientists report today in Nature Energy. Led by engineering researchers at Michigan State University, the authors argue that widespread use of such highly transparent solar applications, together with the rooftop units, could nearly meet U.S. electricity demand and drastically reduce the use of fossil fuels.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by hiihii
    +23 +4

    The dawn of self-driving companies

    If you’ve already imagined how profoundly self-driving vehicles will change our lives, think of what self-driving companies could do. I’m talking about self-executing enterprise software that, when mature, could enable businesses to virtually run themselves. Autonomous companies may be less sexy than autonomous cars, but their impact on society will be just as significant.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by messi
    +19 +4

    Researchers just overcame a key barrier to fusion power

    One promising approach to nuclear power is a type of reactor called a tokamak, which uses powerful magnetic fields to trap super-heated plasma in a bagel-shaped torus. An obstacle to making tokamak reactors viable is that the plasma gets extremely hot, reaching temperatures of up to 100 million degrees Celsius — as hot as the Sun. But according to Reuters, U.K. researchers say they’ve finally found a way to vent that heat safely.