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  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by cone
    +23 +1

    The FCC wants to destroy net neutrality and give giant cable companies control over the Internet

    On July 12th: we’ll stop them. Join the Internet-Wide Day of Action to save net neutrality! The FCC wants to destroy net neutrality and give big cable companies control over what we see and do online. If they get their way, they’ll allow widespread throttling, blocking, censorship, and extra fees. On July 12th, the Internet will come together to stop them.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by doodlegirl
    +1 +1

    Amazon, Reddit join internet 'day of action' for net neutrality

    A coalition of activists and internet companies is mobilizing net neutrality supporters for an online demonstration next month against the Federal Communications Commission’s (FCC) plan to repeal the landmark rules. The groups announced on Tuesday that they will be holding an “internet-wide day of action” on July 12 and will help supporters flood the FCC and Congress with pro-net neutrality messages.

  • Analysis
    1 year ago
    by socialiguana
    +28 +1

    We Could Have Had Cellphones Four Decades Earlier

    Thanks for nothing, Federal Communications Commission.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by Apolatia
    +17 +1

    Man Accused Of Making Millions Of Robocalls Faces Biggest-Ever FCC Fine

    FCC proposed a $120 million fine for a Miami resident said to be single-handedly responsible for 97 million robocalls over a three-month period. Telemarketers are prohibited from making prerecorded phone calls to people without prior consent. It's also illegal to deliberately falsify caller ID with the intent to harm or defraud consumers.

  • Expression
    1 year ago
    by zyery
    +24 +1

    Big Cable broke its promise and you're paying for it

    Last June, Big Cable made an appealing offer for viewers and regulators. Companies would provide consumers with free apps to watch TV rather than making them pay monthly fees for cable boxes. But the cable companies didn’t do this out of the kindness of their hearts — they wanted to stop the Federal Communication Commission from passing regulations making them ship apps.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by TNY
    +28 +1

    Congressman Asks FBI to Look into Fake Net Neutrality Comments

    A Democratic Congressman from New Jersey has asked the Department of Justice and the FBI to look into whether fake comments submitted as part of the FCC’s net neutrality proceeding violated federal law. In a letter sent to Attorney General Jeff Sessions and Acting FBI Director Andrew McCabe this week, Rep. Frank Pallone urged the pair to investigate reports that stolen identities were used to submit comments to the Commission.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by TNY
    +12 +1

    AT&T Says It May Soon Charge You Extra For Privacy

    A top AT&T executive says the company may soon return to charging consumers an additional fee to protect their privacy. Last year, you might recall AT&T quietly started charging between $531 and $800 more each year if customers wanted to opt out of AT&T's Internet Preferences program, which uses deep-packet inspection to track and monetize user behavior around the Internet. AT&T was heavily criticized for the move, and ultimately stopped charging the extra fees...

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by funhonestdude
    +25 +1

    Amazon to throttle services for internet protest

    Some of the world's largest internet companies are preparing to throttle their own websites in a day of protest against the United States' Federal Communications Commission (FCC). The 170 organisations involved - including Amazon, Reddit and Netflix - are preparing to choke their own services on Wednesday 12 July as a warning against FCC proposals for deregulating how internet service providers (ISPs) treat customers.

  • Video/Audio
    1 year ago
    by rookshook
    +40 +1

    Net Neutrality explained and why it matters.

    This is a short video explaining in simple terms what Net Neutrality is and the consequences of abolishing it with the dishonestly named Restoring Internet Freedom Act. You are encouraged to share this non-profit video with anyone and if you wish to use it in your videos or streams, it is licensed under Creative Commons for free use, with attribution and without any alteration.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by drunkenninja
    +21 +1

    If FCC gets its way, we’ll lose a lot more than net neutrality

    Beyond no-blocking rules, Title II plays big role in overall consumer protection.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by Apolatia
    +26 +1

    3 ISPs Have Spent $572 Million to Kill Net Neutrality Since 2008

    A study by Maplight indicates that for every one comment submitted to the FCC on net neutrality (and there have been roughly 5 million so far), the telecom industry has spent $100 in lobbying to crush the open internet. The group found that Comcast, AT&T, Verizon and the National Cable & Telecommunications Association (NCTA) have spent $572 million on attempts to influence the FCC and other government agencies since 2008.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by Pfennig88
    +22 +1

    AT&T’s ‘support’ for net neutrality means tricking customers to fight against it

    If you weren’t paying close attention yesterday, it may have looked like AT&T got onboard the net neutrality “day of action” protest. The company’s website displayed a banner saying that “AT&T supports an open internet,” and it sent a message to DirecTV customers mentioning the same thing. “Tell Congress to adopt permanent protections,” both messages added, before directing people to an “Open Internet” page on AT&T’s site.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by ckshenn
    +30 +1

    Ajit Pai not concerned about number of pro-net neutrality comments

    Two million new pro-net neutrality comments claimed by "Day of Action" organizers.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by sauce
    +15 +1

    It’s our last chance to choose information independence over special interests

    What if you were charged $30 dollars to access only 100 websites? Could you still stream videos online if you had to purchase a $10 “expansion bundle” every month to access video streaming services? Or would you still search the news if you had to spend an additional $20 dollars for an “extension package” every month to access Fox News, CNN, CNBC or MSNBC’s websites?

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by funhonestdude
    +9 +1

    This is why the FCC listens to Comcast—not you—on Net Neutrality

    Net neutrality—the rule that protects the Internet from government and corporate censorship—is incredibly popular. In poll after poll, overwhelmingly majorities of Independents, Republicans, and Democrats say they support net neutrality and oppose efforts to overturn it. So why is the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) trying to kill net neutrality? As usual, follow the money.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by messi
    +22 +1

    AT&T Tricked Its Customers Into Opposing Net Neutrality

    As most of you probably noticed, last week saw a massive, online protest against FCC boss Ajit Pai's plan to completely ignore consumer welfare and gut popular net neutrality protections. Giant ISPs like AT&T, Comcast and Verizon responded to the protest in the way they've always done: by comically insisting that the press somehow got it wrong, and these companies actually really love net neutrality -- despite a decade of documented anti-competitive behavior, and the fact they've spent millions upon millions of dollars trying to kill any meaningful neutrality protections.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by jedlicka
    +2 +1

    Trump Backs FCC Attack on Net Neutrality

    The White House threw its formal support behind FCC boss Ajit Pai's plan to kill popular net neutrality protections. Speaking to reporters Tuesday, White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said the President fully supports the FCC's plan to dismantle the rules, which were created in 2015 to prevent giant ISPs like AT&T, Verizon and Comcast from abusing the lack of competition in the broadband market.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by messi
    +12 +1

    Senator Doesn't Buy FCC Justification for Killing Net Neutrality

    Senator Edward Markey this week questioned FCC boss Ajit Pai's justifications for killing popular net neutrality rules in a hearing in Washington this week. We've noted repeatedly that while large ISPs claim net neutrality killed broadband investment, objective analysis repeatedly finds that to be a lie. That's not just based on publicly-available SEC filings and earnings reports, but the industry's own repeated comments to investors and analysts.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by dianep
    +21 +1

    FCC sets new record with more than 10 million comments on net neutrality

    The public is fired up about net neutrality. More than 10 million comments have been filed at the Federal Communications Commission on a proposal to roll back net neutrality regulations. That's more than twice as many comments as were filed two years ago when the FCC was considering the current rules. The Republican-led FCC introduced a proposal in May to roll back the 2015 rules, and the first public comment period on the proposal ended Monday. A rebuttal period is now underway to allow for additional comments until August 16.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by TheSpirit
    +19 +1

    FCC has no documentation of DDoS attack that hit net neutrality comments

    The US Federal Communications Commission says it has no written analysis of DDoS attacks that hit the commission's net neutrality comment system in May. In its response to a Freedom of Information Act (FoIA) request filed by Gizmodo, the FCC said its analysis of DDoS attacks "stemmed from real time observation and feedback by Commission IT staff and did not result in written documentation."

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by manix
    +12 +1

    FCC Denies Claim It Didn't Document Cyberattack that Crashed Electronic Comment Filing System

    The Federal Communications Commission is pushing back on a report claiming the agency didn’t document a May cyberattack it credited with knocking its website offline while users tried to file comments on a plan to repeal net neutrality rules. Gizmodo published a story Thursday that claims the FCC “holds no records” or “analysis” of multiple distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks the agency says crashed its electronic comment filing system in May. The attacks followed a “Last Week Tonight with John Oliver” segment...

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by spacepopper
    +13 +1

    The FCC Just Got Sued Again—Now for Withholding Records About Its Alleged DDoS Attack

    A second lawsuit has been filed against the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) this week over the secrecy shrouding its plans to kill off net neutrality. An investigative journalist filed paperwork suing the FCC in New York Wednesday afternoon, accusing the agency of improperly withholding records about a May cyberattack that it claims temporarily took down a website used by the public to participate in the net neutrality debate. Specifically, the FCC has been accused of violating the...

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by funhonestdude
    +21 +1

    Senior US Official Claimed the FCC Got 'Hacked' After Security Professionals Found No Proof

    A senior US official has admitted to being the source behind a claim that the FCC was “hacked” in 2014 during the net neutrality debate. Internally, however, the agency’s security team had assessed there was no evidence of a malicious intrusion.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by dianep
    +11 +1

    Congress Gives The FCC An Earful On Its Despised Plan To Kill Net Neutrality

    At this point, more than sixteen million comments have been filed in response to the FCC's myopic plan to kill net neutrality protections, the majority of them in fierce opposition to the idea. We've also noted how more than 900 startups, countless engineers, and a wave of large companies and websites have similarly urged Ajit Pai to stop, pause, and actually listen to what the majority of the country is saying. And what they're saying is that they want Title II and net neutrality protections to remain in place to protect them from giant telecom duopolies with long histories of fiercely-anti-competitive behavior.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by wildcard
    +9 +1

    As net neutrality dies, one man wants to make Verizon pay for its sins

    Imagine if you took every single gripe you've had with Verizon over the past five years — the time it blocked Nexus 7 tablets for five months; the time it forced you to pay $20 per month for tethering; the time it tried to make you use a mobile wallet app called "ISIS" — and finally put your foot down. For a year, you spend free moments holed up in library stacks, speaking with experts, and researching and writing a sprawling legal complaint about the company's many, many misdeeds.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by aj0690
    +10 +1

    Almost All of FCC’s New Advisory Panel Works for Telecoms

    When the Federal Communications Commission went looking this year for experts to sit on an advisory committee regarding deployment of high-speed internet, Gary Carter thought he would be a logical choice. Carter works for the city of Santa Monica, California, where he oversees City Net, one of the oldest municipal-run networks in the nation. The network sells high-speed internet to local businesses, and uses the revenue in part to connect low-income neighborhoods.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by wetwilly87
    +18 +1

    FCC extends net neutrality comment period by two weeks

    You’ll have two extra weeks to file your thoughts with the FCC on its plan to get rid of net neutrality. The proposal’s comment period was originally scheduled to end next week, on August 16th, but the commission just pushed the date out to August 30th. The extension was granted in response to 10 groups asking for more time to respond. They had been looking for an additional eight weeks, but the commission said an additional two weeks would be more in line with the type of extensions granted in the past.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by everlost
    +1 +1

    Democrats Ask FCC Why It's Helping a Pro-Trump Media Company Consolidate Power

    Democratic lawmakers are demanding answers from President Trump's top telecom regulator about an obscure policy change that will allow a pro-Trump media giant to grow even larger. Earlier this year, Trump's Federal Communications Commission (FCC) chief Ajit Pai moved to reinstate a regulatory loophole that will allow Sinclair Broadcast Group, the nation's largest TV station owner by coverage, to buy Tribune Media, another large TV station owner, in a controversial $3.9 billion deal. This would create a national broadcasting giant with more than 230 stations reaching 72 percent of households across the country.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by rhingo
    +24 +1

    72% of Consumers Don't Know What Net Neutrality Is

    Maybe it’s a busy political news cycle, perhaps fatigue, or even worse, it might just be a lack of understanding, but the FCC voted this year to roll back Net Neutrality to much less resistance seen in previous efforts. Despite a fervent tech community voicing concern, very few people seemed able to muster up enough concern to protest this decision.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by zobo
    +12 +1

    The FCC says it wants to be more transparent. Just don't ask tough questions

    Shortly after Ajit Pai was named chair of the Federal Communications Commission in February, he said he wanted the agency to be “as open and accessible as possible to the American people." Six months on, the agency is falling short of Pai’s lofty goal in some key areas. Critics are especially concerned about the FCC’s handling of complaints from the public about internet providers and the causes of a May 7 outage of the public-comments section of the agency’s website.

  • Analysis
    1 year ago
    by wildcard
    +16 +1

    Net Neutrality Reduced to Mogul vs. Mogul in Corporate Media's Shallow Coverage

    A common refrain in popular news media is that net neutrality is just too boring and esoteric for ordinary people to be interested in. “Oh my god that is the most boring thing I’ve ever seen,” John Oliver (HBO, 6/1/14) once exclaimed after showing his audience a short clip from a government hearing on the subject. “That is even boring by C-SPAN standards.”

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by distant
    +25 +1

    Stop hiding 47,000 net neutrality complaints, advocates tell FCC chair

    The Federal Communications Commission is being pressured to release the text of 47,000 net neutrality complaints before going through with Chairman Ajit Pai's plan to eliminate net neutrality rules. The FCC has refused to release the text of most neutrality complaints despite a Freedom of Information Act (FoIA) request that asked for all complaints filed since June 2015. The FCC has provided 1,000 complaints to the National Hispanic Media Coalition (NHMC), which filed the public records request but said last month that it's too "burdensome" to redact personally identifiable information from all 47,000.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by TentativePrince
    +23 +1

    FCC flooded with comments before critical net neutrality vote

    The FCC has received nearly 22m comments on “Restoring Internet Freedom” with just hours left before the window for public feedback closes on Wednesday

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by gottlieb
    +13 +1

    U.S. House panel scraps Sept. 7 net neutrality hearing

    A U.S. House committee said on Wednesday it has canceled a planned hearing on Sept. 7 on the future of internet access rules after no companies publicly committed to appearing. Among those who had been invited in late July to share thoughts before the U.S. House Energy and Commerce Committee were the chief executives of Alphabet Inc, Facebook Inc, AT&T Inc and Verizon Communications Inc.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by rhingo
    +16 +1

    Apple calls for 'strong' open internet protection in FCC comments

    Apple has historically kept quiet on the subject of net neutrality, but not anymore. The company recently filed a comment with the FCC calling for "strong, enforceable open internet protections" centered around the principles of consumer choice, transparency and competition. Apple got its comments in just under the wire, too: the FCC's electronic commenting system says the filing, signed by Apple Public Policy VP Cynthia Hogan, was received on the last day public comments were allowed.