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  • Expression
    2 years ago
    by jcscher
    +10 +1

    From Panama to Sparta: A Brief History of Leaks

    Modern-day leaks may have caused embarrassment and resignations, but in ancient times revealing secrets often ended in death.

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by zyery
    +26 +1

    MIT’s Teaching AI How to Help Stop Cyberattacks

    Finding evidence that someone compromised your cyber defenses is a grind. Sifting through all of the data to find abnormalities takes a lot of time and effort, and analysts can only work so many hours a day. But an AI never gets tired, and can work with humans to deliver far better results. A system called AI2, developed at MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, reviews data from tens of millions of log lines each day and pinpoints anything suspicious.

  • Analysis
    2 years ago
    by geoleo
    +19 +1

    Your phone number is all a hacker needs to read texts, listen to calls and track you

    Hackers have again demonstrated that no matter how many security precautions someone takes, all a hacker needs to track their location and snoop on their phone calls and texts is their phone number. The hack, first demonstrated by German security researcher Karsten Nohl in 2014 at a hacker convention in Hamburg, has been shown to still be active by Nohl over a year later for CBS’s 60 Minutes.

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by zritic
    +30 +1

    Mexican voter database containing 93.4 million records leaks online

    A database reportedly containing roughly 93.4 million Mexican voter registration records was discovered on an Amazon cloud server without any password protection and includes everything from home addresses to ID numbers, a security researcher has disclosed. MacKeeper researcher Chris Vickery, who is well known in security circles for unearthing database flaws by using the Shodan search engine, found the massive trove of records...

  • Analysis
    2 years ago
    by Pfennig88
    +45 +1

    Websites that reject ad-blocker readers don't deserve your clicks

    Ad-blockers are controversial, but are just as much a fact of life as ads are. But now some sites are preventing users with active ad-blockers from accessing their content -- a controversial practice not least because of the security implications, but also as it falls foul of privacy laws for an entire continent. Elephant in the room: ads keep websites free for everyone to access, but they also keep writers and content creators in business because ads are the driving force behind our wages.

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by zyery
    +23 +1

    NSA Silent on Spies’ Child Porn Problem

    The government’s cyber spying outfit has an ‘unbelievable’ child porn problem. But the NSA can’t—or won’t—say how often it finds such criminal images on its workers’ computers.

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by TNY
    +32 +1

    Use LinkedIn? You might want to change that password ... now

    Another day, another security breach. They've almost become routine to many of us. This latest one actually happened in 2012, when LinkedIn, and later EHarmony, revealed that hackers had stolen the login info for about 6.5 million users. The new development is the revelation it actually affected over 100 million users. (Yes, that's significantly more.) And now a hacker is selling user data on the Dark Web marketplace...

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by dianep
    +30 +1

    Uber Knows Too Much About You

    Uber has your home address. It has the addresses of the places you want to get to. It knows when you’re going to church, to your boyfriend’s house, to the union hall, to the doctor’s office. And if you’re a driver for Uber, it’s tracking you for hours and hours each day. We talk a lot about NSA surveillance, National Security Letters, warrant canaries, facial recognition technology, a police van disguised as a Google Maps vehicle, the war against encryption, and government-mandated backdoors.

  • Analysis
    2 years ago
    by manix
    +8 +1

    This custom Android phone promises to protect your privacy — but there's a catch

    A new, yet-to-be-released smartphone promises to put its users' security and privacy first with the help of a radical if not somewhat uncertain approach. Una earlier this month launched its crowdsourcing campaign ahead of the debut of its newest custom-built smartphone: the Unaphone Zenith. Dubbed a "truly private and secure smartphone" that "values your privacy and data as much as you do," the 5.5-inch smartphone runs a modified Android 6.0 operating system called UnaOS.

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by takai
    +34 +1

    For $20M, These Israeli Hackers Will Spy On Any Phone On The Planet

    With just a few million dollars and a phone number, you can snoop on any call or text that phone makes – no matter where you are or where the device is located. That’s the bold claim of Israel’s Ability Inc, which offers its set of bleeding-edge spy tools to governments the world over. And it’s plotting to flog its kit to American cops in the coming months.

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by rhingo
    +30 +1

    Online voting is a cybersecurity nightmare

    It's easy to get excited about internet voting. Social media, Skype, online banking—these types of tools and services have expanded our voices, connected us the world over, and added convenience and efficiency to our lives. Who wouldn’t want to see elections benefit from these kinds of advances? But internet voting isn’t online banking or video calling or tweeting. Voting is a special activity, and trying to do it online poses special problems, most of which security researchers don’t yet know how to solve.

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by funhonestdude
    +34 +1

    Microsoft is banning your stupidly easy-to-guess passwords

    No matter how many times we tell you to change your passwords and make it anything but your birthday, “123456,” or “password,” many still aren’t taking the efforts to make their accounts more secure. So Microsoft is actively doing something about it by banning weak passwords entirely. The team calls it “dynamically banned,” which means that if your account uses a password that appears in the most-used/stolen password list, Microsoft will force you to create a more complex one instead. This will apply to Microsoft Account and Azure AD services.

  • Expression
    2 years ago
    by grandtheftsoul
    +18 +1

    The Chinese Hackers in the Back Office

    Drive past the dairy farms, cornfields and horse pastures here and you will eventually arrive at Cate Machine & Welding, a small-town business run by Gene and Lori Cate and their sons. For 46 years, the Cates have welded many things — fertilizer tanks, jet-fighter parts, cheese molds, even a farmer’s broken glasses. And like many small businesses, they have a dusty old computer humming away in the back office. On this one, however, an unusual spy-versus-spy battle is playing out: The machine has been taken over by Chinese hackers.

  • Video/Audio
    2 years ago
    by TNY
    +11 +1

    Finding an ATM Skimmer in Vienna

    Finding an ATM Skimmer on vacation at the Samsung Cash Machine outside St. Steven's cathedral in Vienna, Austria. While on vacation with my family in Vienna, Austria I went to grab some cash from an ATM, being security paranoid I went repeated my typical habit of checking the card reader as I have 100's of times... today's the day when my security awareness paid off! Check out how perfectly made this skimmer is that was custom made for this ATM MACHINE! Please note that while I am a Carbon Black employee, this video was made on my own accord and is my personal property. Carbon Black did not plant or instigate any of this content.

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by bradd
    +19 +1

    Russia set to pass bill requiring ISPs to eavesdrop on customer data

    Most of the Russian government's attempts to wrangle the internet sound like humorous tirades -- for example, banning Wikipedia for an article on cannabis. But when they command Twitter and Facebook to store Russian users' data inside the country, we're reminded how much they want to keep tabs on their citizens and control their discourse. Yesterday, lawmakers took the first step in passing a measure into law that would require internet providers to give the government access to customer data.

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by geoleo
    +25 +1

    Hackers steal $10 million from a Ukrainian bank through SWIFT loophole

    Hackers have stolen $10 million from an unnamed Ukrainian bank, according to an independent IT monitoring organization. The Kyiv branch of ISACA, the Information Systems Audit and Control Association, reported this week that the theft had occurred via the SWIFT international banking system, the organization responsible for managing money transfers between financial institutions worldwide.

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by ubthejudge
    +27 +1

    How IS terrorists used social media for 'updates' on Dhaka cafe attack

    An analysis by DW's social media expert shows how IS militants used the internet to post 'updates' on the killings. Bangladesh's police ignored crucial clues as 20 people died in the hourslong siege. Militants on Friday stormed into a restaurant and bakery in Dhaka's high-security diplomatic zone, butchering 20 foreigners and initiating a gun battle that left six terrorists and one police officer dead.

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by lostwonder
    +5 +1

    Avast to acquire its security rival AVG for $1.3 Billion

    Avast Software recently announced that it will acquire its rival AVG Technologies for $1.3 billion. The two companies are known for offering internet security products like antivirus software.

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by socialiguana
    +14 +1

    VPN Provider PIA Exits Russia After Server Seizures

    In a digital world where surveillance and privacy invasions are becoming more commonplace, increasing numbers of Internet users are improving their online security. As a result, in recent years there has been an explosion in people deploying privacy-enhancing tools such as VPNs, which enable anyone to add an extra layer of protection against online snoops. One of the most successful companies in this field is London Trust Media, the makers of the popular Private Internet Access (PIA) service. The company prides itself on its dedication to security and is possibly the only operator to have its strict no-logging claims tested in public.

  • Expression
    2 years ago
    by junglman
    +19 +1

    How America Could Go Dark

    An early morning passerby phoned in a report of two people with flashlights prowling inside the fence of an electrical substation in Bakersfield, Calif. Utility workers from Pacific Gas & Electric Co. later found cut transformer wires. The following night, someone slashed wires to alarms and critical equipment at the substation, which serves 16,700 customers. A guard surprised one intruder, who fled. Police never learned the...

  • Expression
    2 years ago
    by rhingo
    +45 +1

    By November, Russian hackers could target voting machines

    Russia was behind the hacks into the Democratic National Committee’s computer network that led to the release of thousands of internal emails just before the party’s convention began, U.S. intelligence agencies have reportedly concluded. The FBI is investigating. WikiLeaks promises there is more data to come. The political nature of this cyberattack means that Democrats and Republicans are trying to spin this as much as possible. Even so, we have to accept that someone is attacking our nation’s computer systems in an apparent attempt to influence a presidential election.

  • Analysis
    2 years ago
    by Project2501
    +6 +1

    Can Facts Slow The DNC Breach Runaway Train?

    “No, no! The adventures first, explanations take such a dreadful time.” (Lewis Carroll)

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by Pfennig88
    +31 +1

    Thieves use chip-and-pin cards to steal up to $50k from ATMs

    Touted as a safer solution to magnetic stripe cards, it seems the chip-and-pin (or EMV) counterpart might not be as secure as we once thought. After retailers around the globe made the switch to the new technology we’re now uncovering vulnerabilities in the cards that make them only marginally superior to their predecessor. A new ATM hack demonstration shows just how vulnerable they are. In the demonstration, hackers were able to use a common chip-and-pin card to withdraw money from an ATM in under 15 minutes.

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by JaminAndrews
    +4 +1

    Census website attacked by hackers, ABS claims

    The census website was shut down after being attacked by foreign hackers, the Australian Bureau of Statistics says.

  • Analysis
    2 years ago
    by junglman
    +27 +1

    Have a smart lock? Yeah, it can probably be hacked

    Once a year, security enthusiasts gather at the Las Vegas-based hacker convention DEF CON to call out vulnerabilities in the tech industry. At DEF CON 2016 -- the 24th such meeting -- presenters Anthony Rose and Ben Ramsey from Merculite Security focused on smart locks. And the news wasn't good. Specifically, the duo tested 16 different Bluetooth-enabled locks and found that 75 percent had "insufficient BLE security." You can find their 42-page slide presentation here, but the gist is that Rose and Ramsey were able to access multiple...

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by TNY
    +35 +1

    Hacker demonstrates how voting machines can be compromised

    Concerns are growing over the possibility of a rigged presidential election. Experts believe a cyberattack this year could be a reality, especially following last month's hack of Democratic National Committee emails. The ranking member of the Senate Homeland Security Committee sent a letter Monday to the Department of Homeland Security, saying in part: "Election security is critical, and a cyberattack by foreign actors on our elections systems could compromise the integrity of our voting process."

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by geoleo
    +30 +1

    Mom discovers security cameras hacked, kids' bedroom livestreamed

    A mother in Houston, Texas woke up one morning to pretty much every parent's worst-case scenario. "I happened to get a text from a friend of mine that said she saw a picture on Facebook and she thought it was a picture of our daughters' room," Jennifer, who asked to keep her last name private, told ABC subchannel KTRK. As it turned out, the security cameras she'd installed in her daughter's room to keep them safe had been hacked and the footage had been uploaded on the internet to livestream.

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by baron778
    +43 +1

    Hackers Say They Hacked NSA-Linked Group, Want 1 Million Bitcoins to Share More

    A mysterious group claims to have stolen some hacking tools allegedly belonging to the NSA.

  • Analysis
    2 years ago
    by larylin
    +43 +1

    Commentary: Evidence points to another Snowden at the NSA

    In the summer of 1972, state-of-the-art campaign spying consisted of amateur burglars, armed with duct tape and microphones, penetrating the headquarters of the Democratic National Committee. Today, amateur burglars have been replaced by cyberspies, who penetrated the DNC armed with computers and sophisticated hacking tools.

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by Chubros
    +16 +1

    FBI says foreign hackers penetrated state election systems

    The FBI has uncovered evidence that foreign hackers penetrated two state election databases in recent weeks, prompting the bureau to warn election officials across the country to take new steps to enhance the security of their computer systems, according to federal and state law enforcement officials.

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by funhonestdude
    +21 +1

    Edward Snowden attacks Russia over human rights and hacking

    The US whistleblower Edward Snowden has attacked his Russian protectors by criticising the Kremlin’s human rights record and suggesting that its officials have been involved in hacks on US security networks.

  • Expression
    2 years ago
    by canuck
    +5 +1

    Someone Is Learning How to Take Down the Internet

    Over the past year or two, someone has been probing the defenses of the companies that run critical pieces of the Internet. These probes take the form of precisely calibrated attacks designed to determine exactly how well these companies can defend themselves, and what would be required to take them down. We don't know who is doing this, but it feels like a large a large nation state. China or Russia would be my first guesses.

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by geoleo
    +33 +1

    Teen hacker infiltrates numerous FTP servers owned by the U.S. government

    On Monday, a report surfaced claiming that a teen hacker using the alias “Fear” managed to gain access to hundreds of FTP servers owned by the U.S. government. The hacker initially gained access to one server, but then discovered that it listed the access credentials to all FTP servers residing on the .us and .gov domains. The .us servers include public data, private data, program source code, and more sensitive data, while the hacker wouldn’t say what’s loaded on the .gov sites.

  • Analysis
    2 years ago
    by Dracher
    +30 +1

    Hackers Stole Account Details for Over 60 Million Dropbox Users

    Although the accounts were stolen during a previously disclosed breach, only now is the extent coming to light.

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by b1ackbird
    +31 +1

    Chinese hackers take over moving Tesla from 12 miles away

    Chinese white-hat hackers (hackers that expose vulnerabilities with good rather than pernicious intentions) just proved that Tesla has a significant security risk on its hands.