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  • Expression
    7 months ago
    by TNY
    +20 +4

    The absurdity of the “can the iPad replace a laptop” debate

    Matt is right on point here. I think the iPhone is the personal computing device of our generation. Our parents had the PC revolution, and it was a massive change unlike almost anything we’ve seen before. The PC was the center of everything for decades, but the smartphone is the new king of the hill. In the first quarter of 2017 it’s estimated 348 million smartphones were sold worldwide, while 62 million PCs we sold in the same time period.

  • Current Event
    7 months ago
    by baron778
    +20 +5

    Computing pioneer Evelyn Berezin died this week—she should be remembered

    Computing pioneer Evelyn Berezin died at 93 this week. She was most known as the designer of the first true word-processing computer. But she designed many other innovative computing systems and helmed Redactron Corporation, a company that helped transform offices by producing and distributing her word-processor device.

  • Current Event
    7 months ago
    by darvinhg
    +22 +4

    ASUS ROG Phone review: A few stumbles can't stop this gaming-phone heavyweight

    Smartphones have achieved the ridiculous level of market penetration they have thanks in no small part to their universal utility: While in the not-too-distant past you might have carried around a separate MP3 player, game console, PDA, flashlight, and any number of other accessories in addition to your cell phone, having all this functionality baked into one device is what helps make the general-purpose smartphone so appealing.

  • Analysis
    7 months ago
    by maelstorm
    +33 +6

    The Yoda of Silicon Valley

    Donald Knuth, master of algorithms, reflects on 50 years of his opus-in-progress, “The Art of Computer Programming.”

  • Current Event
    6 months ago
    by geoleo
    +32 +8

    Two Qubits Could Be Better Than One In Quantum Computing

    Scientists have combined two types of qubit on a single device, potentially overcoming some of the barriers to practical quantum computing. Quantum computing has been on the horizon for a number of years, but there’s more than one problem in making the idea scalable and practical. While the resulting machine could handle maths problems far larger than the greatest modern supercomputer, right now, researchers are struggling to produce a machine that can come up with any coherent answers at all.

  • Current Event
    6 months ago
    by TNY
    +38 +6

    To save us from a Kafkaesque future, we must democratise AI

    Picture a system that makes decisions with huge impacts on a person’s prospects – even decisions of life and death. Imagine that system is complex and opaque: it sorts people into winners and losers, but the criteria by which it does so are never made clear. Those being assessed do not know what data the system has gathered about them, or with what data theirs is being compared. And no one is willing to take responsibility for the system’s decisions – everyone claims to be fulfilling their own cog-like function.

  • Analysis
    5 months ago
    by AdelleChattre
    +15 +3

    Quantum computing as a field is obvious bullshit

    Sort of like making artificial life out of silicon, controlled nuclear fusion power or Bussard ramjets is “just an engineering problem.” By Scott Locklin.

  • Current Event
    5 months ago
    by spacepopper
    +22 +4

    What Games Are Humans Still Better at Than AI?

    Artificial intelligence (AI) systems’ rapid advances are continually crossing rows off the list of things humans do better than our computer compatriots. AI has bested us at board games like chess and Go, and set astronomically high scores in classic computer games like Ms. Pacman. More complex games form part of AI’s next frontier.

  • Current Event
    5 months ago
    by Borska
    +19 +2

    Trump’s Plan to Keep America First in AI

    THE US LEADS the world in artificial intelligence technology. Decades of federal research funding, industrial and academic research, and streams of foreign talent have put America at the forefront of the current AI boom. Yet as AI aspirations have sprouted around the globe, the US government has lacked a high-level strategy to guide American investment and prepare for the technology’s effects.

  • Analysis
    5 months ago
    by MichDe
    +16 +3

    AR Will Spark the Next Big Tech Platform—Call It Mirrorworld

    We are building a 1-to-1 map of almost unimaginable scope. When it's complete, our physical reality will merge with the digital universe.

  • Current Event
    5 months ago
    by geoleo
    +15 +2

    Superfast Raspberry Pi rival: Odroid N2 promises blistering speed for only 2x price

    Hardkernel failed to deliver the $100 Rockchip RK3399-based Odroid-N1 developer board last year due to component shortages. But it's now back with a successor, the Odroid-N2, which is cheaper and performs significantly better in benchmarking tests. The Odroid-N2 won't be as cheap as the $35 Raspberry Pi, but it's also intended for a different market that's willing to pay for some extra memory, more ports, and a faster processor.

  • Current Event
    5 months ago
    by weekendhobo
    +22 +5

    MacBook Pro 2019: what we want to see

    There are some long-time MacBook users out there that are starting to feel like Apple has lost the spark that once brought the company out of its dark ages. There have been a number of new MacBook Pro models in recent years, and other devices, that have been releasing faster than our bank accounts can keep up. And, while some of these upgrades have resulted in improved devices – looking at you, Mac mini – some of these updates have fallen flat.

  • Current Event
    4 months ago
    by jasont
    +21 +3

    Artificially Intelligent Players Invent Nonverbal “Languages” to Win Card Games

    Machines are becoming more collaborative, both with humans and one another. Soon, we may have self-driving cars that negotiate rights-of-way and robots to assist nurses with home care. But first, they’ll need to learn to communicate, and not just through spoken language. Humans say a lot with their actions. Tapping the brakes both slows you and signals potential trouble ahead. Crossing your arms both protects you and signals reticence.

  • Current Event
    4 months ago
    by hedman
    +27 +3

    Intel says its 5G modems won’t be ready until 2020, aligning with Apple’s rumored 5G iPhone roadmap

    Several reports have suggested that the iPhone won’t feature support for true 5G until 2020, and now Intel itself has addressed those concerns. As reported by Reuters, Intel executives have said they don’t expect 5G modem chips to be ready for consumer phones until 2020. Sandra Rivera, head of Intel’s networking chip business, said at an event this week that 5G modems won’t appear in consumer “products in the market” until 2020. This suggests that while Intel might have the technology ready at some point this year, it won’t be early enough for its 5G modems to appear in 2019 phones.

  • Current Event
    4 months ago
    by jedlicka
    +15 +2

    This AI is so good at writing that its creators won't let you use it

    A new artificial intelligence system is so good at composing text that the researchers behind it said they won't release it for fear of how it could be misused. Created by nonprofit AI research company OpenAI (whose backers include Tesla CEO Elon Musk and Microsoft), the text-generating system can write page-long responses to prompts, mimicking everything from fantasy prose to fake celebrity news stories and homework assignments. It builds on an earlier text-generating system the company released last year.

  • Current Event
    4 months ago
    by dianep
    +26 +3

    Why it takes a supercomputer to map a mouse brain

    Inside a 25,000 square foot room within Argonne National Laboratory one of the most formidable supercomputers in the world — Theta — is applying its incredible computing power to the largest batch of data ever recorded or analyzed. It’s information that researchers hope might one day contribute to our understanding of intelligence itself.

  • Current Event
    4 months ago
    by roxxy
    +33 +7

    IBM hopes to double quantum computing speed every year

    Quantum computers are just weird, with data processed by qubits that can store ones and zeros at the same time. But they're like regular "classical" computers in one obvious way: Their designers want them to run faster. Now, with machines like its Q System One, IBM has not only proposed a convenient single number to calibrate a speedometer but also laid out an ambitious dotted line stretching across a road map into the future.

  • Current Event
    4 months ago
    by geoleo
    +25 +2

    USB4 Is Coming, Boasts Data Transfer Speeds as Fast as Thunderbolt 3

    USB 3.2 is still in the process of being rolled out, but its successor has already been announced. USB4 is the next generation of USB technology, now with data transfer speeds double its predecessor. The new standard comes with support from Intel's Thunderbolt protocol.

  • Current Event
    4 months ago
    by timex
    +17 +3

    Google Builds Circuit to Solve One of Quantum Computing’s Biggest Problems

    One of the big limiters to today’s quantum computing systems is that while their superconducting qubits live in a cryogenic enclosure at less than 1 kelvin, all the control and readout circuits must be at room temperature. For today’s sub-100-qubit systems, there’s enough space for specialized RF cabling to come in and out of the enclosure. But to scale up to the million-qubit systems needed to do really cool stuff, there just won’t be enough room.

  • Current Event
    4 months ago
    by jerrycan
    +15 +2

    AI’s Paradox: The Unsolvable Problem of Machine Learning

    Artificial intelligence (AI) is trending globally in commerce, science, health care, geopolitics, and more. Deep learning, a subset of machine learning, is the lever that launched the worldwide rush—an area of strategic interest for researchers, scientists, visionary CEOs, academics, geopolitical think tanks, pioneering entrepreneurs, astute venture capitalists, strategy consultants, and management executives from companies of all sizes. Yet in the midst of this AI renaissance is a relatively fundamental yet unsolvable problem with machine learning that is not commonly known...

  • Current Event
    4 months ago
    by mariogi
    +6 +2

    Nvidia announces $99 AI computer for developers, makers, and researchers

    In recent years, advances in AI have produced algorithms for everything from image recognition to instantaneous translation. But when it comes to applying these advances in the real world, we’re only just getting started. A new product from Nvidia announced today at GTC — a $99 AI computer called the Jetson Nano — should help speed that process.

  • Current Event
    4 months ago
    by ppp
    +15 +4

    Valve's New 'Steam Link Anywhere' Service Streams PC Games to Mobile Devices, Excluding Apple's

    Valve today announced an expansion of its game-streaming app Steam Link, now named Steam Link Anywhere (via The Verge). The original Steam Link app let users stream PC games on Steam to a mobile device within their home, but Steam Link Anywhere lets users stream games from their PC to any compatible device with internet service, excluding Apple devices. Apple rejected the original Steam Link app due to "business conflicts," while the app went on to see a release on Android.

  • Current Event
    3 months ago
    by everlost
    +24 +5

    The next AI explosion will be defined by the chips we build for it

    Hardware design, rather than algorithms, will help us achieve the next big breakthrough in AI. That’s according to Bill Dally, Nvidia’s chief scientist, who took the stage Tuesday at EmTech Digital, MIT Technology Review’s AI conference. “Our current revolution in deep learning has been enabled by hardware,” he said.

  • Expression
    3 months ago
    by distant
    +19 +2

    How to improve MacBook Pro Performance and Thermals

    I have a Early 2015 MacBook Pro , bought it when I joined engineering It’s a thing of beauty and I love it. Which started to get a bit warmer (may be because Global Warming) when Idle and was reaching high temperature with medium load usually Chrome with few tabs, Spotify, VS Code, Terminal etc. If I said that I could perhaps fry an egg on its surface at times, I don’t think I would be too far from the truth.

  • Current Event
    3 months ago
    by canuck
    +26 +2

    Scientists build a machine to generate quantum superposition of possible futures

    In the 2018 movie Avengers: Infinity War, a scene featured Dr. Strange looking into 14 million possible futures to search for a single timeline in which the heroes would be victorious. Perhaps he would have had an easier time with help from a quantum computer. A team of researchers from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) and Griffith University in Australia have constructed a prototype quantum device that can generate all possible futures in a simultaneous quantum superposition.

  • Analysis
    3 months ago
    by socialiguana
    +12 +2

    Researchers Simulated Religious Groups With AI to Try to Understand Religious Violence

    Religious violence is as old as religion itself, but the dynamics that lead to clashes between religious groups are remarkably complex. To get a better grasp on this problem, an international team of researchers turned to simulations that use “psychologically realistic” artificial intelligences to model conflicts between religious groups.

  • Current Event
    3 months ago
    by geoleo
    +23 +4

    This Quantum Computer Can See the Future — All 16 of Them

    When Mile Gu boots up his new computer, he can see the future. At least, 16 possible versions of it — all at the same time. Gu, an assistant professor of physics at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore, works in quantum computing. This branch of science uses the weird laws that govern the universe's smallest particles to help computers calculate more efficiently.

  • Analysis
    2 months ago
    by estherschindler
    +10 +4

    Meet Your iPhone’s Grandparent

    How the calculator morphed into the pocket computer—the predecessor of today’s smartphones

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by grandsalami
    +4 +2

    Intel puts 8 cores, 16 threads, and a 5GHz turbo option in a laptop processor

    The first processors to include Intel's ninth-generation Core branding came out last year with a limited line-up: just a handful of high-end desktop processors in the Coffee Lake family. Today, the company has unveiled a bumper crop of new ninth-gen chips. There's a set of H-series processors for laptops and a complete range of desktop processors across the Celeron, Pentium, and Core brands, from i3 all the way to i9.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by timex
    +29 +2

    Quantum breakthrough could lead to 'super-powered' hard disk drives

    While the world’s focused on the latest Avenger’s flick, an international team of scientists have potentially unlocked the super powers of another familiar Marvel character: Magneto. Researchers from the Argonne National Laboratory, Oakland University in Michigan, and Fudan University in China have discovered a quantum-level exploit that has the potential to give engineers greater control over the magnetic properties of certain metals.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by Amabaie
    +13 +2

    Infants shouldn’t be exposed to electronic screens, new guidelines say

    The WHO drew on emerging - but as yet unsettled - science about the risks screens pose to the development of young minds at a time when surveys show children are spending increasing amounts of time watching smartphones and other mobile devices.

  • Analysis
    2 months ago
    by Bluesky2705
    +12 +2

    Light-based computer hardware that can compete with silicon

    A team of researchers at NTT Corporation has developed a way to use light-based computer hardware that allows it to compete with silicon. In their paper published in the journal Nature Photonics, the group describes their research, the devices they created and how well they worked.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by geoleo
    +22 +3

    AMD to launch new 7nm Navi GPU, Rome CPU in 3rd quarter

    In its earnings call, AMD offered a little more detail about the launch of its next-generation processors, built using the Zen 2 architecture and TSMC's 7nm manufacturing process, and new GPU architecture, Navi, again built on 7nm. Server-oriented EPYC-branded chips (codenamed Rome) should be shipping to customers in the third quarter of this year, and so too will Navi-based video cards.

  • Expression
    2 months ago
    by Clariti
    +3 +1

    A Simple Fix To Poor Business Communications

    Wasteful communication is a major problem faced by businesses all over the world. However, poor employee communication skills alone cannot be blamed for this. Actually, a major portion of the blame has nothing to do with employees communication skills at all. Much of the cause of inefficient communications is from the use of poor communication systems.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by ubthejudge
    +10 +1

    A new camera can photograph you from 45 kilometers away

    Long-distance photography on Earth is a tricky challenge. Capturing enough light from a subject at great distances is not easy. And even then, the atmosphere introduces distortions that can ruin the image; so does pollution, which is a particular problem in cities. That makes it hard to get any kind of image beyond a distance of a few kilometers or so (assuming the camera is mounted high enough off the ground to cope with Earth’s curvature).