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  • Analysis
    1 month ago
    by aj0690
    +35 +4

    As Seas Warm, Galápagos Islands Face a Giant Evolutionary Test

    Climate change is ravaging the natural laboratory that inspired Darwin. The creatures here are on the brink of crisis.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by zobo
    +20 +6

    Carbon labeling can reduce greenhouse gases even if it doesn’t change consumer behavior

    In a new commentary piece published Dec. 18 in Nature Climate Change, Michael Vandenbergh, David Daniels Allen Distinguished Professor of Law and director of the Climate Change Research Network, examines how carbon labeling can help reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in a variety of ways. The article, “From Myths to Action,” is coauthored by Kristian Steensen Nielsen of the Copenhagen Business School in Denmark and comments on recent research by Adrian R. Camilleri and colleagues.

  • Analysis
    1 month ago
    by gotivAa
    +28 +6

    Rising Waters Are Drowning Amtrak’s Northeast Corridor

    By the middle of this century, climate change may punch a hole through the bottom half of the Northeast Corridor.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by ppp
    +19 +4

    Leonardo DiCaprio raises a whopping $100 million to fight climate change

    Is there anything he can't do? Leonardo DiCaprio has proved there’s nothing he can’t do by raising a whopping $100 million (£79 million) to fight climate change. He’s a good egg all round. The Titanic actor, who founded the Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation to increase awareness about climate change, wrote in a statement: ‘When I founded LDF 20 years ago, I did so based on the simple idea that we could make a real difference by directly funding some of the most effective environmental projects.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by bradd
    +26 +5

    Climate Activist, 15, Tells Leaders They're Too Immature to Act

    At 15, Greta Thunberg has many decades of living with the effects of climate change ahead of her—and she doesn't want to tell her grandchildren she didn't try to stop it. At an address to the United Nations COP24 conference in Poland last week, the Swedish activist accused world leaders of stealing the future of her generation and said they weren't mature enough to act, CNN reports. "You say you love your children above all else and yet you are stealing their future in front of their very eyes," she told the conference, which was attended by delegates from 190 countries.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by dynamite
    +16 +4

    Why is Pollution from U.S. Manufacturing Declining?

    In the 1960s, there were worries that U.S. economic growth would lead to increasingly dangerous levels of pollution, and that by the year 2000, air pollution would make cities like Los Angeles and New York uninhabitable. Instead, U.S. air quality has improved dramatically since then. Between 1990 and 2008, emissions of the most common air pollutants from U.S. manufacturing fell by about two-thirds, even as real output from U.S. manufacturing grew substantially (see Figure 1).

  • Current Event
    3 weeks ago
    by baron778
    +26 +3

    The case for "conditional optimism" on climate change

    Is there any hope on climate change, or are we just screwed? I hear this question all the time. When people find out what I do for a living, it is generally the first thing they ask. I never have a straightforward or satisfying answer, so I usually dodge it, but in recent years it has come up more and more often. So let’s tackle it head on. In this post, I will lay out the case for pessimism and the case for (cautious) optimism, pivoting off a new series of papers from leading climate economists.

  • Current Event
    3 weeks ago
    by doodlegirl
    +14 +2

    What the Believers Are Denying

    For two years, they formed a community of experts, about 1,000 in all, including 300 leading climate scientists inside and outside 13 federal agencies. For two years, they volunteered their time and expertise to produce the Fourth National Climate Assessment. There is no parallel process to tackle the questions I study; there is no ongoing national racial assessment mandated by a law summarizing the impact of racism on the United States, now and in the future. Still, I can relate to these climate scientists.

  • Current Event
    2 weeks ago
    by doodlegirl
    +10 +2

    Study: Climate change replaces terror attacks as Czechs’ biggest fear

    Czechs are increasingly concerned about threats related to climate change, suggests a freshly published survey. According to the study by the Median agency, they are mostly worried about drinking water becoming scarce and the impact of drought on the food harvest. On the other hand, Czechs are less afraid of terrorism than in the past, the poll indicates.

  • Current Event
    10 days ago
    by rexall
    +3 +1

    Government still not tackling climate change? So sue them

    Climate action by way of litigation has become a key frontline action, with cases against governments and fossil fuel companies spiralling across the world. The Irish Government is next in the dock, as an environmental group has claimed the national response is inadequate and contravenes the human rights of Irish citizens. The case is due to commence on January 22nd and follows similar proceedings in the Netherlands.

  • Current Event
    9 days ago
    by spacepopper
    +3 +1

    With the right guiding principles, carbon taxes can work

    Like most economists, I favor taxing carbon dioxide to cut carbon pollution. A carbon tax makes fossil fuels like oil and coal more expensive. That, in turn, leads consumers and industries to use less of them. At the same time, it boosts demand for alternative energy sources like wind and solar powered electricity.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by Chubros
    +12 +5

    Can We Grow More Food on Less Land? We’ll Have To, a New Study Finds

    If the world hopes to make meaningful progress on climate change, it won’t be enough for cars and factories to get cleaner. Our cows and wheat fields will have to become radically more efficient, too. That’s the basic conclusion of a sweeping new study issued Wednesday by the World Resources Institute, an environmental group. The report warns that the world’s agricultural system will need drastic changes in the next few decades in order to feed billions more people without triggering a climate catastrophe.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by spacepopper
    +18 +6

    Greenland's ice sheet melt has 'gone into overdrive' and is now 'off the charts'

    The icy realm of Greenland is getting hot under the collar. The melting of Greenland's massive ice sheet has now accelerated, scientists announced Wednesday, and shows no signs of slowing down, according to a new study. "Melting of the Greenland ice sheet has gone into overdrive," said Luke Trusel, a glaciologist at Rowan University and lead author of the study. "Greenland melt is adding to sea level more than any time during the last three and a half centuries, if not thousands of years," he said.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by ppp
    +17 +4

    Climate change caused the “Great Dying,” aka the planet’s worst extinction

    The “Great Dying” was just as bad as it sounds. In the planet’s worst mass extinction 252 million years ago, up to 80 percent of all species died out, including up to 96 percent of ocean species. Trilobites, sea scorpions, and spiny sharks disappeared forever. The rapid reorganization of life on Earth spawned all kinds of unimaginably nasty things, like a giant burp of toxic hydrogen sulfide in the atmosphere released from decaying marine animals.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by spacepopper
    +22 +4

    Can Americans eat less meat? It’s looking promising

    The “Missing Pathways to 1.5°C” report is part of a wider body of scientific research connecting the dots between eating animals and our rapidly changing climate. Report co-author and College of the Atlantic professor Doreen Stabinsky, Ph.D., told me that climate scientists are not so much frustrated as “really freaked out” by the inaction of policy makers and the general public, who continue to eat animal-based diets.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by geoleo
    +17 +5

    The Colorado River is evaporating, and climate change is largely to blame

    An hour’s drive from Las Vegas stands America’s Hoover Dam, a commanding barrier of concrete holding back the trillions of gallons of Colorado River water held inside Lake Mead. The dam is a proud place, built by thousands of hands and with 5 million barrels of concrete. Its golden elevator doors, Gotham-esque pillars, and stoic guardian angel statues line the lofty walkways atop the structure. A U.S. flag beating patriotically over the desert gets swapped out...

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by geoleo
    +13 +5

    While Paris and Washington fought over climate measures, Costa Rica went 300 days on renewable energy alone

    While the west battles itself over the reality of climate change, reasonable diesel tax and how to make their countries sustainable and eco-friendly, Costa Rica has broken their own renewable energy record. The entirety of Costa Rica went 300 days using only renewable energy, beating their own 2015 record of of 299 days on renewable energy, according to The Independent.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by grandtheftsoul
    +22 +6

    Global carbon dioxide emissions will hit a record high in 2018

    Global carbon dioxide emissions are expected to hit a record high in 2018, despite urgent calls from climate scientists and international groups such as the United Nations to cut back. Worldwide, fossil fuel use is projected to pump 2.7 percent more CO2 into the atmosphere in 2018 compared with 2017. Last year, such emissions contributed 9.9 gigatons of carbon. The data are presented in the Global Carbon Budget published online December 5 in Earth System Science Data. 2018 marks the second year in a row that the emissions, which fuel global warming, have risen substantially after a lull from 2014 to 2016.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by wildcard
    +14 +5

    In 200 years, humans reversed a climate trend lasting 50 million years, study says

    What do scientists see when comparing our future climate with the past? In less than 200 years, humans have reversed a multimillion-year cooling trend, new research suggests. If global warming continues unchecked, Earth in 2030 could resemble its former self from 3 million years ago, according to a study published Monday in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences finds.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by geoleo
    +23 +5

    Mention of 'fossil fuels' cut from videos at UN climate talks

    Videos produced by environmental groups to be shown to thousands of participants in a major UN climate summit were banned by organisers for mentioning fossil fuels, in a move campaigners say amounts to censorship. AFP has obtained emails sent by the United Nations to NGOs asking them to remove frames referring to "dirty energy" and "pipelines", claiming that they breached the UN climate convention's rules of participation.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by ilyas
    +15 +3

    Another Major Investor Joins World Bank In Dropping Support For Coal

    The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD) has dropped its support for coal. The World Bank signaled an intent to pivot away from coal in 2013 but continued work on a project in Kosovo that was only recently shelved. Like most major European nations, the EBRD’s new energy strategy also includes ample investment in natural gas plants as an alternative to delivering large, centralized power generation capacity. It’s support for gas, however, will only happen “where it is consistent with a low-carbon transition that is both secure and affordable”.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by lexi6
    +18 +3

    California says all city buses have to be emission free by 2040

    On the heels of a dire government report published last month about climate change and its devastating impacts, many cities and states are scrambling to find ways to curb the greenhouse gas emissions that threaten their air quality, not to mention their economies. As is often the case, California is leading the charge, yesterday becoming the first state to mandate that mass transit agencies purchase fully electric buses only beginning in 2029, and that public transit routes be populated by electric buses alone by 2040.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by geoleo
    +14 +3

    Using archaeology to understand the past, present, future of climate change

    A photo from the tragic "Camp Fire," the most destructive wildfire in California history, shows a house burned down to its foundation. Such images are difficult to process, particularly with 86 people dead. The image got me thinking about what archaeological research can tell us about about disasters and climate change. As an archaeologist, I seek to answer questions about the choices we make, and the things we own and love.

  • Expression
    1 month ago
    by zyery
    +11 +3

    Climate Change and the Limits of Reason

    Humankind is a runaway project. With a world population of more than 7.3 billion, we are a Malthusian plague species. This is not a condemnation or indictment, nor some kind of ironic boast. It is an observable fact. The evidence is now overwhelming that we stand at a crossroads of history and of natural history, of nature and our own nature.

  • Current Event
    1 month ago
    by bradd
    +20 +2

    Offshore wind – bigger is better

    A world-leader in offshore wind. Cutting carbon while cutting bills. Blowing the winds of change through our energy sector. Ministers are never short of praise for offshore wind power. Now the only substantive recipient of new support for renewable energy, Britain’s offshore wind fleet is the largest in the world.

  • Current Event
    2 weeks ago
    by mariogi
    +1 +1

    'We are all in this together': California, Puerto Rico officials join in climate fight

    In the wake of mudslides, wildfires and hurricanes, Southern California elected officials joined the mayor of Puerto Rico's capital city on Sunday, promising to support each other in responding to climate emergencies. The officials drew climate change connections in the struggles following Hurricane Maria in 2017, the worst recorded natural disaster in Puerto Rico history, and the Woolsey Fire that forced nearly 300,000 people from their homes last November and created conditions for mudslides Saturday night that closed a stretch of the Pacific Coast Highway near Malibu.

  • Expression
    12 days ago
    by larylin
    +3 +1

    How the fossil fuel industry got the media to think climate change was debatable

    Late last year, the Trump administration released the latest national climate assessment on Black Friday in what many assumed was an attempt to bury the document. If that was the plan, it backfired, and the assessment wound up earning more coverage than it probably would have otherwise. But much of that coverage perpetuated a decades-old practice, one that has been weaponized by the fossil fuel industry: false equivalence.

  • Analysis
    3 months ago
    by aj0690
    +31 +9

    Arctic ice cap destabilizes at ‘unprecedented’ speed

    Satellite images revealing an Arctic ice cap destabilizing at “unexpected and unprecedented” speed have scientists questioning the stability of some polar ice caps.

  • Analysis
    3 months ago
    by kxh
    +24 +7

    Barley shortages from climate change could mean less beer worldwide

    Even modest warming leads to more drought and excessive heat for barley crops.

  • Current Event
    3 months ago
    by canuck
    +23 +6

    This Remote Hawaiian Island Just Vanished

    Hurricane Walaka, one of the most powerful Pacific storms ever recorded, has erased an ecologically important remote northwestern island from the Hawaiian archipelago. Using satellite imagery, federal scientists confirmed Monday that East Island, a critical habitat for endangered Hawaiian monk seals and green sea turtles, was almost entirely washed away earlier this month.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by TNY
    +17 +5

    Climate change, overharvesting may doom a pricey parasite

    A parasitic fungus that grows wild throughout the Himalayas and sells for more than its weight in gold could vanish if current harvesting and climate trends continue, according to new research from Stanford University.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by doodlegirl
    +21 +5

    With global warming, whale carcasses will no longer be enough to feed polar bears

    In the face of global warming, polar bears continue to lose ground. The gradual withdrawal of the ice could lead to periods of scarcity with worrying repercussions. Among the victims of global warming, polar bears are probably the most iconic. These creatures have probably survived previous warm periods in the Arctic with stranded whale carcasses. However, this source of power may no longer suffice with the gradual removal of ice, reducing the number of platforms on the surface of which they can hunt seals.

  • Analysis
    2 months ago
    by zobo
    +17 +5

    Antarctic's future in doubt after plan for world's biggest marine reserve is blocked

    Environmental groups say Russia, China and Norway played part in rejecting plan.

  • Analysis
    2 months ago
    by TentativePrince
    +18 +5

    European Glaciers Have Been Coming and Going for Thousands of Years, But Now They’re Just Going

    2018 was a terrible year for Swiss glaciers.

  • Image
    2 months ago
    by AdelleChattre
    +15 +4

    Climate change is unraveling this Antarctic ecosystem

    As the Antarctic Peninsula heats up, the rules of life there are being ripped apart. Alarmed scientists aren’t sure what all the change means for the future. By Craig Welch, photographs by Paul Nicklen, Cristina Mittermeier, Keith Ladzinski.