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  • Analysis
    2 years ago
    by Pfennig88
    +32 +1

    Here's What the Iceman Was Wearing When He Died 5,300 Years Ago

    Since the discovery of Ötzi the Iceman in a European glacier in 1991, scientists have recovered a wealth of information from his 5,300-year-old mummified remains: The brown-eyed, gap-toothed, tattooed man most likely spent his 40-odd years farming and herding, and was probably suffering from a painful stomach ache at the time that he died a quick—albeit violent—death in the Öztal Alps. After 25 years of extensive scientific research and media coverage, the Neolithic Iceman has certainly secured his place as "Europe's Oldest Celebrity."

  • Analysis
    2 years ago
    by tukka
    +18 +1

    Deep in the Swamps, Archaeologists Are Finding How Fugitive Slaves Kept Their Freedom

    The worse it gets, as I wade and stumble through the Great Dismal Swamp, the better I understand its history as a place of refuge. Each ripping thorn and sucking mudhole makes it clearer. It was the dense, tangled hostility of the swamp and its enormous size that enabled hundreds, and perhaps thousands, of escaped slaves to live here in freedom.

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by Apolatia
    +1 +1

    Chance find of 49,000yo shelter

    Archaeologists working with traditional Aboriginal owners have discovered astounding evidence of the earliest human habitation of inland Australia. A man answering a "call of nature" in Australia's Flinders made a chance discovery when he stumbled across the earliest evidence yet of human habitation in the country's arid interior. Clifford Coulthard, an Adnyamathanha elder, was surveying gorges in the area in South Australian when "nature called". He happened across a rock shelter, which has turned out to be one of the most important prehistoric sites in Australia.

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by wildcard
    +26 +1

    'Mud Dragon' Dinosaur Unearthed—By Dynamite

    Chinese construction workers excavating bedrock recently made an explosive discovery when they inadvertently unearthed an unusual new species of feathered dinosaur. The animal lived about 66 to 72 million years ago, right before a giant impact wiped out large dinosaurs in a catastrophic mass extinction. (Find out what happened on the day the dinosaurs died.)

  • Current Event
    2 years ago
    by rexall
    +37 +1

    Secret Passageway Found at Shakespeare's Theater

    A secret passageway has been found beneath the stage of the theater where William Shakespeare's Henry V, and possibly Romeo and Juliet, were first performed. The unusual feature was found at the site of the Curtain Theater, one of London's earliest playhouses. Excavations showed the stage of the 16th-century building was much longer than originally thought, and contained evidence of a mysterious passageway running beneath it.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by cone
    +39 +1

    1,000-Year-Old Viking Toolbox Found at Mysterious Danish Fortress

    A Viking toolbox found in Denmark has been opened for the first time in 1,000 years, revealing an extraordinary set of iron hand tools that may have been used to make Viking ships and houses, according to archaeologists.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by 66bnats
    +20 +1

    New Dead Sea Scroll cave found near Qumran, but scrolls are gone

    Over 60 years after the first excavations at Qumran, researchers from Hebrew University said Wednesday that they identified a twelfth cave near Qumran they believe contained Dead Sea Scrolls until it was plundered in the middle of the 20th century. The latest excavation was conducted by Hebrew University and the Israel Antiquities Authority under the auspices of the IDF’s Civil Administration.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by TNY
    +22 +1

    Previously untouched 600BC palace discovered under shrine demolished by Isil in Mosul

    Archaeologists documenting Isil’s destruction of the ruins of the Tomb of the Prophet Jonah say they have made an unexpected discovery which could help in our understanding of the world’s first empire. The Nebi Yunus shrine - containing what Muslims and Christians believe to be the tomb of Jonah, as he was known in the Bible, or Yunus in the Koran - was blown up by Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (Isil) militants soon after they seized huge swathes of northern Iraq in 2014.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by estherschindler
    +28 +1

    Face of 'ordinary poor' man from medieval Cambridge graveyard revealed

    New facial reconstruction of a man buried in a medieval hospital graveyard discovered underneath a Cambridge college sheds light on how ordinary poor people lived in medieval England.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by ckshenn
    +24 +1

    Face of Stone Age woman from Thailand's northern highlands revealed

    Archaeologists have put a face to the oldest human remains excavated from Thailand's northern highlands. The remains of the woman, who lived about 13,600 years ago, were found in the Late Pleistocene Tham Lod rock shelter in north-west Thailand. The woman was between 25 and 35 years old and between 1.48 and 1.56 metres tall.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by geoleo
    +19 +1

    Two-Millennia-Old Underground City Unearthed in Iran

    After more than a decade of excavations, archaeologists unearthed a two-millennia-old subterranean city in Iran’s Samen, Hamedan Province. The city, located 400 km west of Tehran—provisionally dubbed the Underground City of Samen, is “under the modern city of Samen,” said Ali Khaksar, the head of the provincial office of Iran’s Cultural Heritage, Handicrafts and Tourism Organization (ICHTO).

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by jedlicka
    +30 +1

    Remains of five 'lost' Archbishops of Canterbury found

    The remains of five Archbishops of Canterbury have been found beneath a medieval parish church next to Lambeth Palace, the Archbishop of Canterbury's official London residence. Builders renovating the Garden Museum, housed at the deconsecrated church of St Mary-at-Lambeth, found a hidden crypt containing 30 lead coffins. Site manager Karl Patten said: "We discovered numerous coffins - and one of them had a gold crown on top of it".

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by hedman
    +10 +1

    Alberta sun temple has 5,000-year-old calendar

    An academic maverick is challenging conventional wisdom on Canada's prehistory by claiming an archeological site in southern Alberta is really a vast, open-air sun temple with a precise 5,000-year-old calendar predating England's Stonehenge and Egypt's pyramids.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by TNY
    +16 +1

    First settlers reached Americas 130,000 years ago, study claims

    The New World was a shockingly old goal for people or our transformative relatives, say agents of a disputable arrangement of bones and stones. A unidentified Homo species utilized stone devices to break separated mastodon bones, teeth and tusks around 130,700 years prior at a site close to what's presently San Diego.

  • Analysis
    1 year ago
    by wildcard
    +31 +1

    Europe's Famed Bog Bodies Are Starting to Reveal Their Secrets

    High-tech tools divulge new information about the mysterious and violent fates met by these corpses

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by hxxp
    +32 +1

    Europe's Famed Bog Bodies Are Starting to Reveal Their Secrets

    If you’re looking for the middle of nowhere, the Bjaeldskovdal bog is a good place to start. It lies six miles outside the small town of Silkeborg in the middle of Denmark’s flat, sparse Jutland peninsula. The bog itself is little more than a spongy carpet of moss, with a few sad trees poking out. An ethereal stillness hangs over it. A child would put it more simply: This place is really spooky.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by baron778
    +24 +1

    Egypt uncovers chamber of mummies, sees life for tourism

    Egypt has unearthed an ancient burial site replete with at least 17 mummies, most fully intact, the latest in a string of discoveries that the country's antiquities minister described as a helping hand from the crypt for its struggling tourism sector. The funerary site, uncovered eight meters below ground in Minya, a province about 250 km (150 miles) south of Cairo, contained limestone and clay sarcophagi, animal coffins, and papyrus inscribed with Demotic script.

  • Analysis
    1 year ago
    by ppp
    +17 +1

    For 4,500 years, Stone Age humans returned to this mysterious cave

    45,000 years ago, in an area that is now part of Ethiopia, humans found a roomy cave at the base of a limestone cliff and turned it into a special kind of workshop. Inside, they built up a cache of over 40 kilograms of reddish stones high in iron oxide. Using a variety of tools, they ground the stones into different colored powders...

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by hxxp
    +12 +1

    Mass Grave from Thirty Years' War Battle Reveals Soldiers' Fatal Wounds

    In November of 1632, the townspeople of Lützen, Germany, were stuck with a grim task: They had to bury some 9,000 soldiers who were left dead on a battlefield after a bloody fight during the Thirty Years' War. Archaeologists recently undid some of that work. A few years ago, researchers uncovered a mass grave at the site of the Battle of Lützen.By analyzing the bones, they have now learned more about the violent lives and deaths of soldiers from this era. [See Images of the War Grave and Battle Injuries]

  • Analysis
    1 year ago
    by wildcard
    +14 +1

    In Neanderthal DNA, Signs of a Mysterious Human Migration

    A new genetic analysis finds that ancient Africans walked into Europe 270,000 years ago, much earlier than previously known, and interbred with Neanderthals.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by distant
    +12 +1

    A rare 2,700-year-old water reservoir with ancient engravings was unearthed in Israel

    A well-preserved 2,700-year-old reservoir from the Assyrian period was recently unearthed near Rosh Ha’ayin by archaeologists from the Antiquities Authority, the authority announced on Thursday. The excavation was carried out with the aid of archaeology students prior to the groundbreaking of a new residential neighborhood adjacent to the site, initiated by the Construction Ministry.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by wetwilly87
    +21 +1

    Lost crew of 18th Century Dutch treasure ship found off coast of Kent 

    The lost crew of an 18th century Dutch merchant ship has been found by marine archaeologists who were racing against time to preserve the wreck before it is destroyed forever by an invasive sea worm. The Rooswijk sank in bad weather off the coast of Ramsgate in Kent in January 1740, on her second voyage, and was first discovered by a diver in 2005. But after preliminary excavations it was covered up.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by sauce
    +14 +1

    2,000-year-old tombs from Roman period found in Egypt

    A series of tombs dating back about 2,000 years, to the time when the Romans controlled Egypt, has been discovered, the Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities announced Aug. 23. Excavations at Bir esh-Shaghala in the Dakhla Oasis have uncovered tombs made of mudbrick and some are quite large containing multiple burial chambers. Some of the tombs have vaulted roofs and one tomb has a roof built in the shape of a pyramid.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by TNY
    +32 +1

    Fossil footprints challenge established theories of human evolution

    Newly discovered human-like footprints from Crete may put the established narrative of early human evolution to the test. The footprints are approximately 5.7 million years old and were made at a time when previous research puts our ancestors in Africa – with ape-like feet.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by geoleo
    +20 +1

    Major Roman ruins discovered underwater in Tunisia

    Roman ruins stretching over 20 hectares have been discovered off the coast of northeastern Tunisia, confirming "with certainty" a theory that the city of Neapolis was partly submerged by a tsunami in the 4th century AD. "It's a major discovery," Mounir Fantar, the head of a Tunisian-Italian archaeological mission which made the find off the coast of Nabeul, told AFP news agency on Thursday.

  • Analysis
    1 year ago
    by Nelson
    +1 +1

    Ancient tomb with mummies unearthed in Egypt

    Luxor, Egypt (CNN)Egyptian authorities unveiled a previously undiscovered ancient tomb belonging to a goldsmith and his wife near Luxor in southern Egypt on Saturday. The tomb, at the Draa Abul Nagaa necropolis, contains "mummies, sarcophagi, statuettes, pots and other artifacts," according to Egypt's Ministry of Antiquities.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by socialiguana
    +15 +1

    Viking sword discovery: Hunter finds 1,100-year-old weapon on Norwegian mountain

    The incredibly well-preserved Viking sword was found by a reindeer hunter on a remote mountain in Southern Norway. The Glacier Archaeology Program at Oppland County Council was recently notified about the sword, which was found in late August in the high mountains of the Lesja area. “It is a common type of Viking sword - what makes it special is the context and the preservation: It was found at 1640 m [5381 feet] above sea level,” explained Lars Pilø, an archaeologist at Oppland County Council, in an email to Fox News. “To my knowledge, a Viking sword has never been found at such a high altitude before.”

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by TentativePrince
    0 +1

    Mystery of Great Pyramid may be solved, researchers say

    New evidence proves that the ancient Egyptians constructed the Great Pyramid at Giza by transporting 170,000 tons of limestone in boats. It has long been known that the rock was extracted eight miles away in Tura and that granite used in the monumental structure was quarried 533 miles away in Aswan.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by cone
    +22 +1

    Archaeologists Find Lost Ancient Greek Temple Of Goddess Artemis

    It took more than 100 years of searching but archaeologists have finally found a lost temple to the ancient Greek goddess Artemis. The Greek Ministry of Culture reported that a team has found the remains of the sanctuary near Amarynthos, a coastal town a couple of dozen miles northeast of Athens on the large Greek island of Euboea. Scientists and historians have spent more than a century looking for what is left of the temple, but an ancient text with inaccurate directions threw them off the trail.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by Chubros
    +24 +1

    Archaeologists find 4,000-year-old obelisk near Cairo

    Egypt says archaeologists have discovered the upper part of royal obelisk dating back more than 4,000 years. The Antiquities Ministry said Wednesday the unearthed part of the obelisk is made of pink granite and is about 2.5 meters (yards) high. The entire obelisk is believed to have been at least twice as high.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by spacepopper
    +50 +1

    Scientists discover hidden chamber in Egypt's Great Pyramid

    Scientists have found a hidden chamber in Egypt's Great Pyramid of Giza, the first such discovery in the structure since the 19th century and one likely to spark a new surge of interest in the pharaohs. In an article published in the journal Nature on Thursday, an international team said the 30-meter (yard) void deep within the pyramid is situated above the structure's Grand Gallery, and has a similar cross-section. The purpose of the chamber is unclear, and it's not yet known whether it was built with a function in mind.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by dynamite
    +3 +1

    Ancient workout: Archaeologists in Egypt discover 2,300-year-old gymnasium

    Archaeologists in Egypt have unearthed an ancient gymnasium that dates back to the third century B.C. The site is the first ever gym found in Egypt dating back to the ancient Hellenistic, or Greek, period. A joint team of German and Egyptian archaeologists made the discovery at Watfa in Fayoum province, about 50 miles southwest of Cairo.

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by tukka
    +8 +1

    These may be the world’s first images of dogs—and they’re wearing leashes

    Carved into a sandstone cliff on the edge of a bygone river in the Arabian Desert, a hunter draws his bow for the kill. He is accompanied by 13 dogs, each with its own coat markings; two animals have lines running from their necks to the man’s waist. The engravings likely date back more than 8000 years, making them the earliest depictions of dogs, a new study reveals. And those lines are probably leashes, suggesting that humans mastered the art of training and controlling dogs thousands of years earlier than previously thought.

  • Current Event
    11 months ago
    by geoleo
    +32 +1

    Archaeologists discover 2 ancient tombs in Egypt's Luxor

    Egypt on Saturday announced the discovery of two small ancient tombs in the southern city Luxor dating back some 3,500 years and hoped it will help the country's efforts to revive its ailing tourism sector. The tombs, located on the west bank of the river Nile in a cemetery for noblemen and top officials, are the latest discovery in the city famed for its temples and tombs spanning different dynasties of ancient Egyptian history.

  • Current Event
    11 months ago
    by Apolatia
    +15 +1

    Ancient penguin was as big as a (human) Pittsburgh Penguin

    Fossils from New Zealand have revealed a giant penguin that was as big as a grown man, roughly the size of the captain of the Pittsburgh Penguins. The creature was slightly shorter in length and about 20 pounds (9 kilograms) heavier than the official stats for hockey star Sidney Crosby. It measured nearly 5 feet, 10 inches (1.77 meters) long when swimming and weighed in at 223 pounds (101 kilograms).