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  • Current Event
    4 months ago
    by lexi6
    +22 +8

    This Tiny Home Grows With The Push Of A Button

    Love the idea of a tiny home, but not the tiny square-footage? ZeroSquared, a Calgary-based company, has come up with tiny home model that is flipping the script on tiny home living — with only one touch of a button. The Aurora tiny home will expand using motorized slide-outs, immediately creating more living space. In fact, the home will almost double in width — going from 8.6 feet to 15.1 feet wide and offering a total 337 sq.-ft. of living space.

  • Current Event
    4 months ago
    by funhonestdude
    +39 +11

    Shani Shingnapur: The Village Without Doors

    About 300 km east of Mumbai, in the remote Indian village of Shani Shingnapur, crime is a concept so alien that villagers here have stopped guarding their houses, their properties and their valuables. Nobody locks their cars and motorbikes anymore. Shopkeepers leave cash in unlocked drawers overnight, and housewives keep jewelry in unlocked boxes, inside houses that have no doors —just a wooden door frame with a curtain drawn across to protect the privacy of the residents.

  • Analysis
    4 months ago
    by zyery
    +34 +7

    Why South Korea predicts its end will come in 2750

    South Korea may be doomed. A recent study, conducted by the National Assembly Research Service in Seoul, predicts that the country will reach zero inhabitants by 2750. The report makes it clear where the country's problem lies: A remarkably low birth rate of 1.19 children per woman. But what's really striking is the speed at which it could happen: South Korea's population (currently larger than Spain) could shrink to a level comparable to tiny Switzerland within only a few generations.

  • Analysis
    4 months ago
    by wildcat
    +33 +7

    Record 40% of Japanese sleep less than six hours a day

    A record 39.5 percent of Japanese get less than six hours of sleep a day, according to an annual health ministry survey. Male respondents attributed their short sleep time to their job and health, while women cited housework and their job, the 2015 National Health and Nutrition Survey found. The survey also highlighted the risk of exposure to secondhand smoke in restaurants and workplaces — which remains high despite the government’s aim of meeting global standards ahead of the 2020 Tokyo Olympics.

  • Current Event
    4 months ago
    by geoleo
    +35 +12

    A day in the life of a care worker: 23 house calls in 12 hours for £64.80

    It’s 6.30am and still dark, and Jean is setting out for her job as a home care worker. When she returns in 12 hours’ time she will have made 23 house calls to sick and elderly people, driven 20 miles between appointments and earned £64.80 before tax. Jean isn’t her real name. Along with fellow care workers in this northern town she is on a zero-hours contract and fears losing work if her employer is unhappy with her. She fears that speaking out about how she has to race between visits, cutting short her appointments in order to earn the “national living wage”, might result in an immediate loss of earnings.

  • Analysis
    4 months ago
    by zyery
    +35 +7

    Inside the world of Australian opal miners who live underground

    Photographer Tamara Merino and her boyfriend were driving through the desert in Australia in November 2015 when they started to see a few odd signs: “Underground bar,” then “underground restaurant.” After they got a flat tire, they found an underground church — empty, but lit by a few flickering candles. They had stumbled into the city of Coober Pedy, a partly subterranean community and the opal capital of the world. The town’s name comes from the Aboriginal phrase “kupa piti,” or, roughly, “white man’s hole.”

  • Expression
    4 months ago
    by rexall
    +22 +6

    Welcome to Canlandia

    “Congratulations on moving to Toronto,” said the FedEx guy, looking down at the job contract I was scanning. There we were, surrounded by bars, clothing stores, and coffee shops full of people working on Macs—exactly where you would expect a young New Yorker to want to be. The city to which I would be returning, in contrast, had always felt a bit like a holding pen for the people waiting to get to the Lower East Side. You have Drake,” he said.

  • Current Event
    4 months ago
    by gottlieb
    +29 +7

    Photos show the privileged lives of North Korea’s new elite

    When Christian Petersen-Clausen visited North Korea last year, he was struck by how few people had cellphones. In a world where it seems virtually everyone is now connected by mobile technology, the Hermit Kingdom lived up to its name. But when the China-based photographer returned to Pyongyang earlier this year, phones were suddenly everywhere.

  • Current Event
    4 months ago
    by jedlicka
    +18 +7

    Dementia patient: 'Assessors say I'm improving'

    Thousands of people living with degenerative conditions such as dementia, Parkinson's and multiple sclerosis (MS) are losing part or all of their disability benefits after being reassessed. Wendy Mitchell, who has early onset dementia, told the Victoria Derbyshire programme how her benefits have stopped following a reassessment, despite her belief that her condition has got worse.

  • Current Event
    3 months ago
    by socialiguana
    +27 +5

    A Job Is More Than a Paycheck

    In the aftermath of the 2016 presidential election, I’m starting to rethink one of my basic beliefs about the economy. For a long time, I’ve believed that what mattered most for economic well-being was money. Median income, consumption, wages -- all the things I cared about most were measured in dollars. Because of this attitude, I’ve supported lots of policies aimed at boosting the amount of money in the average person’s pocket.

  • Current Event
    3 months ago
    by belangermira
    +38 +12

    Amazon unveils ‘self-driving’ brick-and-mortar convenience store

    The 1,800-square-foot store, dubbed “Amazon Go,” is the latest beach in brick-and-mortar retail stormed by the e-commerce giant. It’s clearly a sign Amazon sees a big opportunity in revolutionizing Main Street commerce.

  • Current Event
    3 months ago
    by geoleo
    +20 +7

    Why Living Near Water is Good For Your Mind

    As someone healing from debilitating postpartum depression and anxiety, I've come to realize that a short walk near the ocean, a lake, or even a reservoir calms my anxious mind. In the cities where I've lived—New York City and Singapore—I have never been more than a few minutes from a river or a strait or a harbor, and I turn to them often in times of distress.

  • Analysis
    3 months ago
    by gladsdotter
    +32 +9

    What would it take to make an age-friendly city?

    Planned, multi-generational communities might be great for those who can afford them. The rest of us need cities better equipped for older people.

  • Analysis
    3 months ago
    by geoleo
    +31 +8

    The Libertarian Utopia That’s Just a Bunch of White Guys on a Tiny Island

    With some luck, Liberland, the unrecognized three-square-mile territory on the Western bank of the Danube, might one day become the Libertarian utopia for disaffected white men.

  • Current Event
    3 months ago
    by aj0690
    +41 +5

    Amazon workers sleeping in tents near Dunfermline site

    At least three tents have been spotted in woodland beside the online retail giant’s base just off the M90 in Dunfermline in recent days, sparking concerns about the depths some employees are apparently plumbing to hold down a job.

  • Unspecified
    3 months ago
    by everlost
    +44 +11

    Banning Smoking in Public Housing is Just Another Experiment on the Poor

    It is understandable, given everything else going on, that there has not been much controversy around the Department of Housing and Urban Development’s (HUD) new plan to ban smoking in all public housing. And after all, why should there be controversy? Liberals like the smoking ban because it’s a public health initiative, and keeps children from getting asthma. Conservatives couldn’t care less about some new public housing regulation. Banning smoking in housing projects is a plan everyone can be happy with.

  • Current Event
    3 months ago
    by takai
    +23 +7

    Mental health and relationships 'key to happiness'

    Good mental health and having a partner make people happier than doubling their income, a new study has found. The research by the London School of Economics looked at responses from 200,000 people on how different factors impacted their wellbeing. Suffering from depression or anxiety hit individuals hardest, whilst being in a relationship saw the biggest increase in their happiness. The study's co-author said the findings demanded "a new role from the state".

  • Analysis
    3 months ago
    by wildcat
    +29 +7

    Why Minimum Wage Hikes Work, in 3 Charts

    The biggest argument against raising the minimum wage is that it’s going to end up cutting jobs. By having to pay each worker extra, the cost of producing goods or services will increase. So, the argument goes, employers will either pass that cost off to customers (by raising prices) or try to find savings elsewhere (by investing in equipment rather than workers, or reducing the hours their employees work). Either way, the total demand for labor will drop.

  • Analysis
    3 months ago
    by Apolatia
    +37 +9

    100 CEOs Have as Much Retirement Savings as 116 Million Americans - Monetary Watch

    While many Americans are facing a “frightening retirement reality,” 100 CEOs are looking at “colossal nest eggs” and can look forward to monthly retirement checks of over $250,000 for the rest of their lives. The Institute for Policy Studies (IPS) puts a spotlight on this massive savings gap in its newreport (pdf), “A Tale of Two Retirements.”

  • Analysis
    3 months ago
    by Nelson
    +31 +6

    Robots will take our jobs – but that's good for the future of civilisation

    The next time you're standing at a busy junction, look around and count how many people you can see driving for a living. Tot them up – bus drivers, van drivers, Amazon deliverymen, Ubers, black cabs, hauliers – and you're looking at the single biggest sector of our economy. Yet, in another decade or so, almost all these men – they're mainly men – will be out of work, displaced by driverless cars and delivery drones.

  • Analysis
    2 months ago
    by gladsdotter
    +29 +8

    Why people get happier as they get older

    As people age, they gain what they spend their lives pursuing: happiness

  • Image
    2 months ago
    by jcscher
    +19 +6

    In Pictures: Twelve months, Twelve Frames

    The best images of 2016 by Getty Images photographers as selected by Hugh Pinney.

  • Analysis
    2 months ago
    by tranxene
    +43 +6

    Charles Bukowski wrote this letter about quitting the 9 to 5 Life, 30 years later it’s more relevant than ever.

    As a young man I could not believe that people could give their lives over to those conditions. As an old man, I still can’t believe it. What do they do it for? Sex? TV? An automobile on monthly payments? Or children? Children who are just going to do the same things that they did?

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by Petrox
    +23 +4

    People who don't have children benefit our environment more than any campaign

    The global population is growing rapidly, while the resources we depend on to live are dwindling. If you consider the footprint each person makes on the world – in terms of food and water consumed, electricity and gas used, and waste produced – the challenge of improving living standards while protecting natural resources and the environment is striking. The question of human population size is fundamentally one of sustainability, and in that so is the choice to have children.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by socialiguana
    +24 +6

    Any way you calculate it, income inequality is getting worse

    A flurry of new reports have provided yet more data demonstrating that inequality is getting worse. All right, this does not qualify as a shock. But it really isn’t your imagination. The economic crisis, nearly a decade on now, has been global in scope — working people most everywhere continue to suffer while the one percent are doing just fine. One measure of this is wages.

  • How-to
    2 months ago
    by AdelleChattre
    +24 +6

    How to Become a ‘Superager’

    Sudoku isn’t enough. You have to push yourself.

  • Expression
    2 months ago
    by drunkenninja
    +32 +7

    Your Life in Weeks

    All the weeks in a human life shown on one chart. Sometimes life seems really short, and other times it seems impossibly long. But this chart helps to emphasize that it’s most certainly finite. Those are your weeks and they’re all you’ve got. Given that fact, the only appropriate word to describe your weeks is precious. There are trillions upon trillions of weeks in eternity, and those are your tiny handful. Going with the “precious” theme, let’s imagine that each of your weeks is a small gem, like a 2mm, .05 carat diamond.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by funhonestdude
    +41 +7

    Take It From A German: Americans Are Too Timid In Confronting Hate

    In Germany, we were taught over and over again that Hitler came to power because ordinary people were afraid to stand up and speak out. Americans could stand to learn that lesson now.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by zyery
    +30 +7

    Saving New Zealand's murder capital: 'We don't want to be defined by death'

    Ringed by golden beaches and temperate Pacific seas, Kaitaia is unconscionably pretty, dotted with flaming red pohutukawa trees and blessed by year-round blue skies. The town of 5,000 people on the northern tip of New Zealand’s North Island should be known as a holiday resort, but instead it has been dubbed the murder capital of New Zealand after four homicides and six suicides in a single year.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by gottlieb
    +17 +3

    Colombia Kidnappings Down 92% Since 2000

    According to Colombian police officials, the number of people kidnapped in their nation has fallen by 92% since 2000. The country used to be considered one of the most popular zones for kidnapping in the world, with an estimated 30,000 people captured since 1970. Thanks to the recent peace deal between the rebels of The Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia People’s Army and the government, thus ending their 52 year war, only about 188 people were kidnapped in 2016, showing historic new progress.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by zyery
    +21 +4

    Detectives on the toll of investigating child deaths: it only gets harder

    There has been little research into what it’s like for police detectives to investigate the death of a child. As bluntly stated in official police guidance documents “children are not meant to die”, and coping with these circumstances, especially as a detective and parent, could involve emotional and psychological demands beyond those experienced when investigating adult murders.

  • Analysis
    2 weeks ago
    by bradd
    +1 +1

    Gamers Are Having A Lot More Sex Than 'Gym Goers', Study Finds

    Stereotypes are hard to get rid of. Even amongst the gaming community we tend to see the average gamer as an overweight, frustrated, mouse-grabbing male; one with little to no knowledge of what makes a decent beard. But, time and time again, scientific studies have stepped in to shatter the image of #VideoGames in popular culture. I must say, even though I'm someone who supports challenges to the stereotypes that hold our industry back, I had no idea that we were so... promiscuous.

  • Expression
    1 year ago
    by zobo
    +38 +14

    If you were handed $1,100 a month, would you amount to anything?

    Would Germany be a better place if each citizen received a no-strings-attached government check for $1,100 a month? Would people still get out of bed each day and go to work or do something else productive even with that unconditional basic income of 1,000 euros, less than half the average German monthly wage, but more than twice what those on welfare receive?

  • Current Event
    1 year ago
    by Apolatia
    +44 +11

    Caffeine Junkies, Rejoice! Coffee Just Got Cheaper

    If you’re obsessed with (or barely functional without) your morning cup of joe, you’re not alone— 59 percent of Americans drink a cup of coffee every day, according to the National Coffee Association. And now, that daily cup is poised to become more affordable. As Marvin G. Perez reports for Bloomberg News, coffee prices are falling fast. Thank the weather in Brazil for the declining price of coffee, writes Perez: A rainy season in the country led to better Arabica coffee growth...

  • Expression
    1 year ago
    by TNY
    +43 +13

    What It Feels Like to Be Adopted at 17

    Earlier this year, I legally became an Esparza, five years after they took me in. It took five years for me to realize that these people were serious about being my parents; five years of doubting their love, but yearning for what they claimed to offer. We had to go to court and wear dresses and ties — it was kind of like a marriage. When I entered the building my body immediately tensed up, and my mom put her hand on the small of my back. We walked into the courtroom where...