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  • Analysis
    1 month ago
    by hxxp
    +26 +3

    Epilepsy drug discovered in fish model shows promise in small pediatric clinical trial

    “Bench-to-bedside” describes research that has progressed from basic science in animal models that has led to therapies used in patients. Now, a study in the journal Brain describes what could be considered a direct “aquarium-to-bedside” approach, taking a drug discovered in a genetic zebrafish model of epilepsy and testing it, with promising results, in a small number of children with the disease. The study was supported by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), part of the National Institutes of Health.

  • Analysis
    1 month ago
    by Apolatia
    +21 +4

    Six centuries of geomagnetic intensity variations recorded by royal Judean stamped jar handles

    Understanding the geomagnetic field behavior in the past, and, in particular, its intensity component, has implications for various (and disparate) fields of research, including the physics of Earth’s interior, atmospheric and cosmologic sciences, biology, and archaeology. This study provides substantial data on variations in geomagnetic field intensity during the eighth to second centuries BCE Levant, thus significantly improving the existing record for this region.

  • Analysis
    5 months ago
    by canuck
    +35 +15

    A New Tack to Stave Off Alzheimer's Years before the First Symptom

    The new mantra for researchers fighting Alzheimer’s disease is “go early,” before memory loss or other pathology appears. The rationale for this approach holds that by the time dementia sets in the disease may already be destroying brain cells, placing severe limits on treatment options. Some large clinical trials are now testing drugs intended to clear up the brain’s cellular detritus—the aggregations of amyloid and tau proteins that may ultimately destroy brain cells. So far this approach has had decidedly mixed results.

  • Current Event
    4 months ago
    by robmonk
    +35 +9

    Scientists find key protein for spinal cord repair

    A freshwater zebrafish costs less than two bucks at the pet store, but it can do something priceless: Its spinal cord can heal completely after being severed, a paralyzing and often fatal injury for humans. While watching these fish repair their own spinal cord injuries, Duke University scientists have found a particular protein important for the process. Their study, published Nov. 4 in the journal Science, could generate new leads into tissue repair in humans.

  • Current Event
    4 months ago
    by wildcard
    +26 +10

    'Mud Dragon' Dinosaur Unearthed—By Dynamite

    Chinese construction workers excavating bedrock recently made an explosive discovery when they inadvertently unearthed an unusual new species of feathered dinosaur. The animal lived about 66 to 72 million years ago, right before a giant impact wiped out large dinosaurs in a catastrophic mass extinction. (Find out what happened on the day the dinosaurs died.)

  • Current Event
    4 months ago
    by rexall
    +37 +10

    Secret Passageway Found at Shakespeare's Theater

    A secret passageway has been found beneath the stage of the theater where William Shakespeare's Henry V, and possibly Romeo and Juliet, were first performed. The unusual feature was found at the site of the Curtain Theater, one of London's earliest playhouses. Excavations showed the stage of the 16th-century building was much longer than originally thought, and contained evidence of a mysterious passageway running beneath it.

  • Current Event
    4 months ago
    by mariogi
    +41 +10

    ‘We Couldn’t Believe Our Eyes’: A Lost World of Shipwrecks Is Found

    The medieval ship lay more than a half-mile down at the bottom of the Black Sea, its masts, timbers and planking undisturbed in the darkness for seven or eight centuries. Lack of oxygen in the icy depths had ruled out the usual riot of creatures that feast on sunken wood. This fall, a team of explorers lowered a robot on a long tether, lit up the wreck with bright lights and took thousands of high-resolution photos. A computer then merged the images into a detailed portrait.

  • Analysis
    4 months ago
    by gladsdotter
    +33 +8

    Researchers Develop Way To "Fingerprint" the Brain

    Using a new imaging technique, researchers have developed a way to "fingerprint" the human brain, confirming what scientists have always thought to be true: the structural connections in the brain are unique to each individual person.

  • Analysis
    4 months ago
    by zritic
    +25 +6

    Ant species cultivates coffee for accommodation

    Scientists on the island of Fiji have discovered a type of ant that plants, fertilizes and guards its own coffee crops. The industrious creatures have been perfecting their agricultural know-how for millions of years.

  • Analysis
    3 months ago
    by distant
    +34 +7

    Geologist uncovers 2.5 billion-year-old fossils of bacteria that predate the formation of oxygen

    Somewhere between Earth's creation and where we are today, scientists have demonstrated that some early life forms existed just fine without any oxygen. While researchers proclaim the first half of our 4.5 billion-year-old planet's life as an important time for the development and evolution of early bacteria, evidence for these life forms remains sparse including how they survived at a time when oxygen levels in the atmosphere were less than one-thousandth of one percent of what they are today.

  • Current Event
    3 months ago
    by cone
    +39 +11

    1,000-Year-Old Viking Toolbox Found at Mysterious Danish Fortress

    A Viking toolbox found in Denmark has been opened for the first time in 1,000 years, revealing an extraordinary set of iron hand tools that may have been used to make Viking ships and houses, according to archaeologists.

  • Current Event
    3 months ago
    by AdelleChattre
    +26 +8

    New Giant, Air-Breathing Fish Discovered

    Several other species of arapaimas are likely lurking in the Amazon, waiting to be identified. By Brian Clark Howard.

  • Current Event
    3 months ago
    by weekendhobo
    +30 +7

    Ancient Marsupial Relative May Have Eaten Little Dinosaurs

    An ancient mammal the size of a badger may have used its bone-crushing canines and powerful bite to take down little dinosaurs, researchers have found. In fact, the little guy could chomp down with more force, pound for pound, than any other mammal on record. The creature (Didelphodon vorax), an early marsupial relative, lived during the last few million years of the Mesozoic, or dinosaur age, in what is now present-day Montana and North Dakota, the researchers said.

  • Current Event
    3 months ago
    by rawlings
    +20 +7

    Swedish and Greek archaeologists discover unknown city in Greece

    An international research team at the Department of Historical Studies, University of Gothenburg, is exploring the remains of an ancient city in central Greece. The results can change the view of an area that traditionally has been considered a backwater of the ancient world. Archaeologists from the University of Gothenburg have begun exploring a previously unknown ancient city at a village called Vlochós, five hours north of Athens. The archaeological remains are scattered on and around the Strongilovoúni hill on the great Thessalian plains and can be dated to several historical periods.

  • Current Event
    3 months ago
    by grandtheftsoul
    +30 +7

    World’s oldest water gets even older

    The world’s oldest water, which is locked deep within the Earth’s crust, just got even older. The liquid was discovered deep down in a mine in Canada in 2013 and is about 1.5 billion years old. But now, at the same site, University of Toronto scientists have found a deeper source of water that is at least 500 million years more ancient. The work was presented at the American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting in San Francisco.

  • Current Event
    3 months ago
    by timex
    +28 +5

    Strange giant diamonds give hints to the inner Earth's composition

    The largest diamonds ever mined on earth aren’t just set apart by their large size and luster, but by a unique origin story as well. They were born of metal, growing from patches of liquid iron and gas deep inside the Earth. That’s the conclusion formed in a study published in Science on Thursday, written by Evan Smith of the Gemological Institute of America. Most diamonds form somewhere between 150 and 200 km [93 and 124 miles] deep in the Earth.

  • Analysis
    3 months ago
    by zritic
    +37 +6

    Graphene-Fed Silkworms Produce a Super-Strong Silk That Conducts Electricity

    The carbon-enhanced silk conducts electricity, is twice as tough as regular silk, and can withstand at least 50 percent higher stress before breaking. This smart textile could have applications in medicine, athletics, wearable electronics...the possibilities are endless.

  • Current Event
    3 months ago
    by larylin
    +29 +8

    Prostate cancer laser treatment cures half of trial subjects

    A new prostate cancer treatment that combines lasers and deep-sea bacteria could be "truly transformative," according to a team of researchers. A trial conducted with 415 men across Europe finished with nearly half completely free of cancer compared to 13.5 percent given regular treatment. To top it off, unlike with current, aggressive therapies that can cause impotence and urinary incontinence, most of the subjects were free of side effects after two years.

  • Analysis
    3 months ago
    by hxxp
    +33 +8

    A Retired Professor Thinks He's Found the Location of King Arthur's Camelot

    A retired professor from the UK says he might have pinpointed the location of Camelot, the legendary castle where stories claim that King Arthur held court some 1,400 years ago - if he actually existed. According to Arthurian literature expert Peter Field, Camelot used to stand at the site of an ancient Roman fort called Camulodunum in Slack, West Yorkshire in the UK, which would have been an ideal spot in 500 AD, when King Arthur is argued to have existed as a real-life military expert tasked with defending Briton from invaders.

  • Current Event
    3 months ago
    by darvinhg
    +28 +6

    Ammonia Detected in Earth's Atmosphere for First Time

    In an unexpected first, researchers have discovered ammonia in Earth's lowest atmospheric layer, a new study said. The detected ammonia was most concentrated in the upper layer of the troposphere above India and China, countries that have experienced population and economic booms in recent years. The gas (NH3) is most likely coming from livestock farming and fertilization in those countries, the researchers said.

  • Analysis
    3 months ago
    by Pfennig88
    +20 +4

    This 509-year-old map contains the first known use of the word 'America' — but not where you may think

    In April 1507, German cartographer Martin Waldseemüller published his Universalis cosmographia secundum Ptholomaei traditionem et Americi Vespucii aliorumque lustrationes, or The Universal Cosmography according to the Tradition of Ptolemy and the Discoveries of Amerigo Vespucci and others. It was the first known map to feature parts of the New World labeled “America,” derived from the Latin version of Vespucci’s first name.

  • Current Event
    3 months ago
    by TNY
    +29 +6

    Exclusive: Stunning New Photos of Isolated Tribe Yield Surprises

    Deep in the Brazilian rain forest, these protected Indians freely pursue a timeless way of living.  

  • Current Event
    3 months ago
    by doodlegirl
    +28 +8

    6 More Mysterious Radio Signals Have Been Detected Coming From Outside Our Galaxy

    Back in March, scientists detected 10 powerful bursts of radio signals coming from the same location in space. And now researchers have just picked up six more of the signals seemingly emanating from the same region, far beyond our Milky Way. These fast radio bursts (FRB) are some of the most elusive and explosive signals ever detected from space - they only last milliseconds, but in that short period of time, they generate as much energy as the Sun in an entire day. But despite how powerful they are, scientists still aren't sure what causes them.

  • Analysis
    3 months ago
    by zyery
    +22 +5

    Ancient Chinese malaria remedy fights TB

    A centuries-old herbal medicine, discovered by Chinese scientists and used to effectively treat malaria, has been found to potentially aid in the treatment of tuberculosis and may slow the evolution of drug resistance. In a promising study led by Robert Abramovitch, a Michigan State University microbiologist and TB expert, the ancient remedy artemisinin stopped the ability of TB-causing bacteria, known as Mycobacterium tuberculosis, to become dormant. This stage of the disease often makes the use of antibiotics ineffective.

  • Analysis
    3 months ago
    by manix
    +22 +6

    Metformin Plus Syrosingopine Effectively Combats Cancer Cells

    A combination of a diabetes medication and an antihypertensive drug effectively fights cancer cells, according to a team of researchers at the University of Basel. They also report that specific cancer cells respond to this combination of drugs. Metformin is the most widely prescribed drug for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Besides its blood sugar lowering effect, it also displays anti-cancer properties. The usual therapeutic dose, however, is too low to effectively fight cancer. The research team led by Prof. Michael Hall, at the Biozentrum of the University of Basel, has now made an unexpected discovery. The antihypertensive drug

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by geoleo
    +30 +8

    Massive object frozen under Antarctica

    SCIENTISTS believe a massive object which could change our understanding of history is hidden beneath the Antarctic ice. The Sun reports the huge and mysterious “anomaly” is thought to be lurking beneath the frozen wastes of an area called Wilkes Land. It stretches for a distance of 151 miles across and has a maximum depth of about 848 metres. Some researchers believe it is the remains of a truly massive asteroid which was more than twice the size of the Chicxulub space rock which wiped out the dinosaurs.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by larylin
    +20 +4

    Severe PMS Linked to Gene Network Disturbance

    Even though its causes have been unclear, premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) has been described as a severe form of premenstrual syndrome (PMS). Affecting 2–5% of women of reproductive age, PMDD is like PMS in that it follows a predictable, cyclic pattern. Yet PMDD, which is marked by disabling irritability, sadness, and anxiety, is associated with unusual sensitivity to fluctuations in sex hormones. This sensitivity has motivated researchers to focus on PMDD’s potential biological drivers, rather than on psychological or cultural phenomena.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by zyery
    +20 +6

    Promising new drug stops spread of melanoma by 90 percent

    Michigan State University researchers have discovered that a chemical compound, and potential new drug, reduces the spread of melanoma cells by up to 90 percent. The man-made, small-molecule drug compound goes after a gene's ability to produce RNA molecules and certain proteins in melanoma tumors. This gene activity, or transcription process, causes the disease to spread but the compound can shut it down. Up until now, few other compounds of this kind have been able to accomplish this.

  • Expression
    2 months ago
    by AdelleChattre
    +22 +7

    The Couple Who Saved China’s Ancient Architectural Treasures Before They Were Lost Forever

    As the nation teetered on the brink of war in the 1930s, two Western-educated thinkers struck out for the hinterlands to save their country’s riches. By Tony Perrottet.

  • Analysis
    2 months ago
    by canuck
    +32 +5

    Baboons use vowel sounds strikingly similar to humans

    For decades, scientists thought that most primates could not produce vowels, sounds fundamental to human speech. That’s because nonhumans supposedly lacked the necessary vocal anatomy. But now, researchers report that Guinea baboons, monkeys that inhabit the forests and savanna of West Africa, make five vowellike sounds similar to those used by humans. The findings bolster a recent study showing that Japanese macaques are also anatomically capable of speech.

  • Analysis
    2 months ago
    by junglman
    +20 +3

    Scientists Use Light to Turn Mice Into Predatory Killers

    The house mouse is a relatively benign animal, feeding almost entirely on plant matter. Its scientific counterpart, the laboratory mouse, is even more so, dieting on nutritive food pellets. But tickle a specific part of its brain, and this humble rodent instantly transforms into a predatory killer. When Ivan Eid Tavares de Araujo, an Associate Professor of Psychiatry and of Cellular and Molecular Physiology at Yale University, uncovered this fascinating neurological quirk...

  • Analysis
    2 months ago
    by drunkenninja
    +27 +3

    Scientists genetically modified salmonella to eat cancerous tumors

    Everybody hates food poisoning. If you could wave a magic wand and rid the Earth of it in an instant, you’d totally do it, right? Well, maybe not. Because as it turns out, a strain of food poisoning may just be our best ally in fighting an even worse enemy: Glioblastomas, aka one of the deadliest forms of brain cancer around. According to a new research project carried out by biomedical engineers at Duke University, the bacterium Salmonella typhimurium can be tweaked to turn a nasty bug into a veritable “cancer-seeking missile.”

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by darvinhg
    +12 +3

    Cows are secretly being fed defective Skittles because it's cheaper than corn

    American farmers have secretly been feeding their cows defective Skittles to avoid paying for corn. That discovery was made public after a truck deposited hundreds of thousands of Skittles onto a rural road. All of them were in one colour and without the trademark "S" on them and, after they were found, the police were forced to ask highway cleaners to get rid of them. Unknown to many, the practice has been going on for years, according to experts.

  • Current Event
    2 months ago
    by robmonk
    +30 +4

    Physicists may have just manipulated 'pure nothingness'

    It's one of those philosophical questions we occasionally ponder: What is nothing? Can nothing be something? If not, then how can something come from nothing? If there's one scientific field on the forefront of such conceptual paradoxes, it's quantum theory. And in quantum theory, nothing actually is something ... sort of.

  • Expression
    2 months ago
    by jcscher
    +22 +3

    Claim made for Hydrogen 'Wonder Material'

    US scientists draw controversy as they claim to have fulfilled the decades-long quest to turn hydrogen into a state where it behaves like a metal.