LOUNGE all new asksnapzu ideasforsnapzu newtribes interesting pics videos funny technology science technews gaming health history worldnews business web research entertainment food living internet socialmedia mobile space sports photography nature animals movies culture travel television finance music celebrities gadgets environment usa crime politics law money justice psychology security cars wtf art google books lifetips bigbrother women apple kids recipes whoa military privacy education facebook medicine computing wildlife design war drugs middleeast diet toplists economy fail violence humor africa microsoft parenting dogs canada neuroscience architecture religion advertising infographics sex journalism disaster software aviation relationships energy booze life japan ukraine newmovies nsa cannabis name Name of the tribe humanrights nasa cute weather gifs discoveries cops futurism football earth dataviz pets guns entrepreneurship fitness android extremeweather fashion insects india northamerica
+47
Save

What are your hobbies and how did you get started with them?

Bonus question: what are some interesting hobbies you want to try but do not know where to start?

7 months ago by wickedcoder256 with 45 comments

Join the Discussion

  • Auto Tier
  • All
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
Post Comment
Conversation 8 comments by 5 users
  • canuck
    +5

    Golf, poker, video games, tv shows. They just came to me I guess.

    • wickedcoder256
      +5

      Which tv shows are you currently watching? What video games are you excited about?

      Thank you for your answer and have a nice day! :]

      • canuck
        +5

        TV shows: The Night Of (airs every Sunday on HBO), Vice Principals (same), Stranger Things (Netflix), and waiting for some shows, like both Walking Dead's, Better Call Saul, True Detective, to come back.

        Games: Still playing Fallout 4, got it on the summer sale. Looking forward to NHL 17 the most.

        • wickedcoder256
          +3

          Yay, I watched Stranger Things and True Detective as well.

          Stranger Things: Am I the only person bothered by no one caring about Barb? And El dying was so sad, after all she went through.

          True Detect: Do you think season 2 was as bad as a lot of people say it is?

          I didn't think it was that bad, although I have not actually watched the first one yet.

          • OL44893
            +6

            Stranger Things: Nope. You're not the only one. And I'm not sure El is dead. Remember the eggos & yummies in the hatch?

            Yes, I thought True Detective 2 was wretched. I could go into all the reasons why...

            Fargo, seasons 1 & 2 -- love!

            • wickedcoder256
              +4

              Stranger Things: Hmm you and /u/twoBits might be right, I completely forgot about that scene in the end!

          • twoBits
            +5

            Stranger Things was great! My wife and I just finished it last night. Are you sure in Stranger Things that ...El actually died. Didn't Hopper put Eggos and cookies in a box for her at the end?

            • Appaloosa (edited 7 months ago)
              +6

              How polite and thoughtful you 3 are blanking out the spoilers!!

Conversation 9 comments by 5 users
  • elemental
    +10

    I use to draw in high school. I was pretty good. That was in the late 70's. In 40+ years my hands and mind took a lot of abuse, plus my body. After a life changing event I started to slow down a little and last year I took up trying to draw again. I had no hand/eye coordination. I never knew where to start even if there was something in front of me. I couldn't even grip a pencil in my hand but I kept going because it kept me calm. Slowly I got my grip but found i could hold markers easier so I switched to sharpies. Then I discovered zentangle and mandalas and how detailed some were. That's were I'm at now, plus I started doing the alphabet because I had no subject and found it to be a good exercise in coordination, colors. I tried watercolors but that's hard as hell. I'm in no hurry so I'll just do what I'm doing.

    Here's my blog where I track my progress. I rarely give it out because I never thought I was any good at it but other bloggers have found it and encourage me along. If I knew how to, I would post them here if there's an art section. Plus you'd have to show me how to do it.

    https://elementalfractal.wordpress.com/

    • wickedcoder256
      +7

      Your drawings are beautiful!

      You can always post them to /t/art tribe and/or /t/pics, by clicking green "Submit" button then "Upload image / compose." That should get you a snap with an image module, then just sort out title, description, tribes in which you want to post it and optionally tags. Here is a post from teamsnapzu that might help.

      Thank you for your answer and have a nice day! :]

    • Appaloosa
      +4

      Very inspirational! I like to take pictures and old Disney artist friend of mine tutored me on how to use a camera. Over the years I've gotten pretty good and I have always wanted to start my own blog to do just what you did!....so you've just put some more wind into that sail.

      You must have the patience of Job to do all of that detailed work!

      • elemental
        +7

        I never learned to use a camera but I've caught a few good shots. the first thing I ever uploaded to a blog was a photo. I switched over to wordpress and just went nuts uploading everything. They have decent free templates and for $25 a year you can get a .com blog name. The free is good enough for me.

    • OL44893
      +4

      Stunning

    • RoamingGnome
      +1

      Pretty cool. Do you draw those lines freehand?

      • elemental
        +2

        Yes, I'll do it rough with a pencil to get an idea, then finish with a ultra fine sharpie. I do use a compass for the circles and a square to get angles

  • Yamadori
    +9

    Bonsai.

    Growing up, I've always had a curiosity about caring for small trees in pots, but I got serious about 5 years ago. I gather most of my trees from the wild, in Japanese the idea is called 'yamadori' - going up into the mountains to take a tree.

    What you only really need to get started is a sunny outdoor location. Bonsai is 100% not an indoor sport. First, you'll need to learn the horticulture - how to grow healthy and strong trees. You'll be tempted to buy species that are unsuitable for your USDA growing zone (I am 6B), but you'll have so much more success if you stick to native trees that are well adapted to your current climate. For me in Pennsylvania, that means maple, hornbeam, pine, and beech. You'll be stressing these trees greatly as you cut them and force them to live in small quarters; if you aren't also fighting the climate you simply wont have as many casualties.

    One of the characteristics that all good bonsai have is taper. It refers to a trunk that is broad and spreading at the soil line and tapers to a point at the top, like a cone. This gives the impression that a mature, developed tree has been hit with a shrink ray. It mimics the perspective you get with tall objects; a vanishing point.

    Once you are confident that you can keep a tree alive, healthy, and growing strong, you'll want to develop a vision for its final structure and form. This is where you delve into the art side of bonsai. This will mean first growing the trunk to its final desired thickness, then the primary branches, then lastly getting the twigs and leaves small, dense and ramified. Always in this order. You'll be growing the tree large and repeatedly chopping the trunk and branches back to save what you want, the bones.

    Trees should be grown in the native soil or if that's not feasible, then at least a large container (5-20 gallon pot) for the first several years of its training. Once you cut the roots and seat it in a nice small bonsai pot, its growth will slow almost to a halt. Trees gain trunk caliper only if their canopy is growing tall and spreading wide. So we treat bonsai pots as the final step. At that point, you focus on maintenance - growing the foliage into dense pads, keeping the energy balanced from top to bottom / inside to out, and keeping the roots as fine feeders instead of thick structural roots.

    Copper or aluminum wire is used to train the woody branches and twigs into desirable shapes and directions. Its wound around the tree in a 45* spiral from the base outwards to the thinner wood, allowed to stay on for many months. The sweet spot is after the wood has lignified (hardened off) into the new form, but before so much new wood has grown that the wire bites in. It looks really bad if there's a deep spiral wound in the branches from the wire.

    I have many trees in varying stages of development. As I said, its important to get the girth on your tree as soon as possible, then cut it back and regrow the finer branches. This means that you often gather large trees from nature or tree nurseries as a starting point instead of growing seedlings. That being said, I have about 50 seedlings of varying species growing in the gorgeous garden soil at my parents'. But I know that those trees wont be in a final bonsai pot for 20 years.

    So, bonsai is a very rewarding art that requires certain principles to be followed. You can do it casually and informally, but if you are going to spend the t...

    ... Read Full
    • OL44893
      +6

      Impressive! Bonsai are so lovely and must be very calming.

    • wickedcoder256
      +4

      Thank you for such an in depth explanation of bonsai! Joined bonsai tribe because it sounds fascinating. :]

  • OL44893
    +7

    I'm not sure these activities I like are hobbies per se and time spent is kinda of seasonal. During yucky, yuck weather I crochet & knit, I also do these doodle things, and projector expressionism. Outdoors stuff would be collect sea beans, do tombstone chalkings, and I really like exploring abandoned places. I don't know if this is a hobby, but I've this goal to visit all the manned lighthouses or lighthouse sights (b/c the lighthouse is gone) in NZ. This is rather more a journey b/c some of these sights are not public access so I have to get clever or creative or both to get to the sight (like talking my way to a ride with a maintenance crew).

    I wish I could garden but I kill everything, so that's a waste. My father and grandfather collected stamps and I inherited the collection -- I tried to get into collecting but I'm terrible at it (anyone want to buy a stamp collection?) Wait! Cookbooks, I like cookbooks, especially ones associated with a brand or something. I just was gifted the best -- The Metropolitan Cook Book from the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company, 1918. There's a section on Invalid Cookery, Oatmeal Gruel anyone?

    Thinking about raising snails.

    • wickedcoder256
      +6

      Crocheting and knitting are awesome! What do you usually crochet/knit?

      I started crocheting a month or so ago, and I love crocheting amigurumi.

      Thank you for your response and have a nice day! :]

      • OL44893
        +5

        Amigurumi, how adorable! I've been really into retro patterns lately and I can pick up the older patterns at 2nd hand bookstores and op-shops. So, I just finished a crochet mini-dress for a friend, it's a lemony yellow color, just in time for spring! Another friend is having a baby so I'm going to bust out a baby blanket next. I'd like to take up the challenge of circular knitting -- socks, and hats would be nice to do. I've more confidence in my crocheting abilities. I thought about joining the local knitting group to get some pointers but apparently they are hardcore and get tetchy if you miss meetings... I'd rather be around some chilled knitting peeps that could make a good gin&t.

        Any thoughts about pure wool versus blends? I ask because 100% wool here is ridiculously expensive and I'm considering going with a blend for the baby blanket -- I know that seems odd and less "pure" -- but I've been reading that the blends don't shrink so much with frequent washings? And there are some super soft blends available.

        • wickedcoder256
          +7

          Your retro patterns sound great! I am fascinated by people crocheting clothes, I wish to try something simple like a cap eventually. Chilled people are the best. :]

          I would love to help you with your wool vs blends question, but honestly I have not messed with too many different yarns. I mostly work with 50% cotton 50% bamboo blend (Fibra natura bamboo jazz) because it is cheap and so soft! Sadly it easily splits which can be annoying but is relatively manageable.

          • OL44893
            +8

            Oh the splitting (>_<) I made a vest using a lovely lavender raw silk. Nightmare to work with. I like the bamboo, my favorite scarf is from bamboo. But funny bit it's a soft brown right. Then I thought to trim the ends in a variegated green? Yeah, looks like camo on the ends. Makes me giggle. Clothes are heaps of fun to make. If you can make amigurumi you can make a beanie. Just have to pick a fiber that won't stretch too much or eventually have a floppy beanie. Course I just chunk mine in a hot wash, ta da!

            Tried to make a felt rug once, it was pretty but damn it shrunk to kid size and not worth the cost/effort. The cats love it.

            • wickedcoder256
              +3

              Your stories is funny! Both the camo scarf and the kitty felt rug :D

              Don't you hate/love how quickly yarn stash accumulates? I want to do like a scarf or blanket just to go through all my stash D: Amigurumis barely make it any smaller!

              Have a nice day! :]

            • Gozzin
              +5
              @wickedcoder256 -

              Do you have pictures of your work?

            • wickedcoder256
              +3
              @Gozzin -

              Sure do, I can PM them to you if you want :] So far made a whale and Oddish amigurumi, and a couple simple single crochet bracelets.

            • Gozzin
              +3
              @wickedcoder256 -

              You could show them to everybody! People love seeing art work. If your really shy,you can pm them.

            • wickedcoder256 (edited 7 months ago)
              +4
              @Gozzin -

              >_< Yeah, I am pretty shy, I'll pm you :]

            • OL44893
              +4
              @wickedcoder256 -

              Don't you hate/love how quickly yarn stash accumulates? Yes! I so do! You could easily do a blanket with the leftover bits -- the tying on and off and tucking might be a bother. I've taken to picking up vintage suitcases to store the yarn in then I stack the suitcases "decoratively."

            • wickedcoder256
              +5
              @OL44893 -

              Do you "weave in ends"? It's almost always in patterns but I usually just fasten off then knot (using a needle) and remove the rest.

    • Appaloosa (edited 7 months ago)
      +6

      If you are going to do the exploring for goodness sakes, bring a camera. I love to do the same thing , and when you bring a camera, how you look at things is so much more rewarding. Your attention to detail goes up exponentially, you are looking at light, old details to capture, textures, suddenly that old lighthouse has things you never knew were there, the bolts on the stairs, the rust on the metal, weathered grain of the wood, the worn cobblestones...and then the process of trying to capture what you see brings what you are looking at into even greater focus!

      I used to raise snails, but I had to give it up. The neighbors called the cops on me several times from all of the noise. It really came to a head when they attacked the dog. Dreadful creatures.

      • OL44893
        +7

        Uhm, I'm a terrible picture taker, really they are awful. I document that I've been to my lighthouse objective w/ a picture, but lordy lou, I'm sooo bad I hashtag my pics with #shittypic I can "see" what I want to be able to capture but I never feel like I manage it. Like it's just out of my grasp.

        hahaaa too funny about snails! heehee I'll keep that in mind. They are just so pretty. And I kinda like watching them, but then I really liked having an ant farm when I was a kid and my dad kept bees which I totally want to do some day or other.

        Oh and I see where the topic is also about how got into these hobbies. The lighthouse thing happened b/c I used to work close to the National library and on lunch I'd go to the archive and read the keeper's journals and letters. That got me super interested in the lives of the people in these remote places. So I bought a book with all the manned lighthouses and started a list and then set out to see them all. Kinda a daft goal but I'm on a long-term plan. Oh gosh, did the Cape Brett walk over last Christmas and let me say, that was an undertaking. Stunning and breathtaking. I can't even describe fully the shear beauty. Crochet I learned in 4H. Knitting, my neighbor was this grand lady of 79 she grew the prettiest, fragrant roses (which of course my cats liked to poop around) anyway, she taught me to knit. I'd go over to her house for tea and knitting and sassy talk. Sea beans I live on an island. I found one, got curious. Game on. Chalkings, I like graveyards and you'd be surprised at the epitaphs, that got me started and when I travel I always try and seek out peeps I'm interested in, like Eudora Welty, Faulkner, Robert Johnson, and so on. Big problem is where to hang them. Projector expressionism, (I call it expressionism b/c art is rather far fetched for me) work bought spiffy new projectors and they were going to throw out the old ones and I said ooooh I want! I can't draw a lick but I project a picture and then can sketch and interpret it my way. I mostly like to play with unlikely mediums. I digress -- I got into because I nabbed a projector from the trash heap. And cookbooks, hell-o fooooood! Yum-Yum.

        • Appaloosa
          +5

          You lead an interesting life!

          • OL44893
            +6

            Thankyee, I reckon it's different. But my folks died when I was barely out of my teens leaving me and my brother. One outcome of that is a focus to see and do. I'm hoping in the next couple years to downsize to an Airstream and split my time between North America and NZ, working some remotely. Just need to figure out if the cats will be travel okay :)

  • Gozzin
    +6

    Gardening,art,nature watching,photography,computers,video games,Linux,cooking and reading. I've also had pets all my life,so I guess one could say they are sort of a hobby.

    • elemental
      +6

      Linux, I'm 100% turned over to linux. My flavor is Linux Mint KDE 17.3. The first distro in 10 years that's worked flawless and looked good at the same time. Hopefully Mint can get the new KDE kernal to work properly, no one else can. I just built me a new computer and installing windows didnt even cross my mind

      • Gozzin
        +4

        Installing Windows never crosses my mind either.

    • wickedcoder256
      +5

      What do you like to read? Which pets have you had? (I hope that's not too personal) What do you have in your garden and when did you start gardening?

      Thank you for your answer and have a nice day! :]

      • Gozzin
        +6

        I mostly read science fiction and historical fiction. Right now I'm reading the Old Man's War and am on Zoe's tail. I skipped Jane's Diary as it was unreadable. I've had lots of pets. Grew up with a gsd, I've had hamsters,budgies,chickens,ducks,a skunk,a flying squirrel,rats,mice,and house rabbits. I started gardening as a kid after i got a book on genetics. My project was to produce double blossom salmon pink and also white touch me nots. It took several generations, but I did it. Once I got a triple blossom white..I was astounded. My garden now is the usual stuff,lettuce,tomatoes,that sort of thing.

        • wickedcoder256
          +4

          Damn, you basically had a whole zoo as pets! :o

          Your genetics project sounds fascinating, would you mind elaborating on how you did it? :]

          • Gozzin
            +4

            That was not all at the same time. I saved the recessive seed colors (salmon pink, white and pale pink). I then fertilized them with a cotton swab. I'd plant the seeds and wait till I had blooms and keep the plants I wanted. I did the same thing with getting double blossoms. I basically was inbreeding plants till I got double blossoms,then double blossoms crossed to those colors.

            • wickedcoder256
              +3

              Does inbreeding plants lead to higher risk of negative mutations?

            • Gozzin
              +3
              @wickedcoder256 -

              It's possible...I've not investigated plants that deeply.